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ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 N. MAIN, ST. 

ANTIOCH, ILL 600Q2 



ANT 10CH 10WN3H IP 
LIBRARY « 3 -8 

757 MAIN ST. COMBO 
ANTIOCHt ILL 60002 



Lakeland 

^ |* Newspapers 



libKcollon 



VOL. 101— NO. a 



ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1987 



FOUR SECTIONS— 60 PAGES 



35" PER COPY 



Wedding Expo '87 Sunday; Jan. 18 



See Details Inside 



Fast Action 
By Two Men 
Saves House 






by PATTY KOROM 

Without the quick reaction of a H.O.D. 
Disposal employee and an area resident, a 
house fire on Jan. 8 at 26512 Stonegate in An- 
lioch could have been a lot worse. 

According to fire department spokesman, 
Wayne Parthun, two men, Ed Cotter and 
Ross Barrett are to be credited with quick 



inside 



■HI 




Opposition 




-Page 14A 



ty. Museum 
Set to Reopen— 

It's A ■**#««»irj#«l 



) 




—Page 3B 



Liberty Lakes Plan 
Suffers Setback 

—Page 9 A 



Thought For Day 
Call Classified! 



••• 




87 



Business. . . . . ... ... • • • • -.7-80 

Classified . . , 17 * 2 1» 

editorial ■ * ' ' ■ 

Legal Notices .116 

Family/Home 3-3B 

Obituaries .. . . . ... ♦ • * °^ 

Sports ....... . . ......... • 9"1*"' 

Dlnlng/Entortalnmont 3.©A 

Television ... . ..,.;. • •'.^••£ 



thinking when a fire was discovered at the 
.house. 

The fire started in the basement of the 
single story frame structure and was ap- 
parently cause by a natural gas space heater 
that malfunctioned. 

The heater ignited a nearby wooden 
clothes closet and spread up the basement 
stairs. 

According to Parthun, Cotter noticed the 
smoke and went to the rear of the home to 
check for anyone who might be in the house. . 

After gaining entry, Cotter found a dog and 
a cat which Cotter removed from the house 
safely. . 

He then went to his truck to radio his 
dispatcher at HOD who in turn called the An- 
tioch Fire Dept. . 

- Upon returning to the house, Cotter and 
Ross Barrett gained entry to the front of the 
house to search for people. 

The fire department responded to the fire 
call at 8:05 a.m. 

The owner of the house, listed as Miss 
Keating, told officials that she had left for 
work before 6:00 a.m. and noticed nothing, 
unusual. 

Keating's nephew said that he had driven 
by the house at 6:30 a.m. and did not notice 
anything unusual either. 

"Credit has to go to Cotter and Barrett for 
their quick actions in this fire," Parthun 
said. 

Pancakes At 
St. Peters 

Antioch Boy Scout Troop 190 will sponsor a 
pancake breakfast on Jan. 26 at St. Peters 
Church in Antioch. 

Proceeds from the breakfast will be used 
to help defray the cost of Troop 190's newly 
acquired camping equipment. 

According to troop spokesman^ Don Reif- 
schneider, the troop hopes to raise between 
$800 and $1,000 at the pancake breakfast. 

Pancakes will be served between 8 a.m. 
and 1 p.m. and tickets can be purchased at 
the door. Ticket prices are: adults, $3; 
children, $2; children three and under are 
free] ' 



Society 
To Meet 



The Lakes Region Historical Society wijl 
hold their next meeting on Jan. 22 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Brook Room at the State Bank of 
Antioch. 

Members of the group are committed to 
restoring the historical past of the lakes 
region and are currently working to restore 
the old school house in Antioch. 

According to member Ken Smouse, the 
first floor of the building is near completion, 
and plans arc being made to begin 
restoration of the second floor. 

Anyone interested in learning more about 
the area's history and the Lakes Region 
Historical Society can attend the next 
meeting. 



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Winter Fun 

Exhiloraling is the best description for a ride down It's Snow Fun Inc's. snow tubing 
trail. Novice tuber, Jason Korom of Waukegan enjoys an afternoon on the trails. 
It's Snow Fun Inc. Is located north of Antioch on Wifmot Rd., one half mile north of 
Rte. 173 — photoby Potty Korom. 

Name Don Skidmore 
As Lions President 



by PATTY KOROM 

The Antioch Lions Club kicked off its 50th 
anniversary year during the installation of 
new officers at the Patio Restaurant in An- 
tioch Monday night. 

Don Skidmore accepted the president's 
gavel from outgoing Lions president, John 
Wolf. 

In a message to fellow Lions, Wolf com- 
mended the Lions for their support during 
the past year and praised them for the club's 
accomplishments in 1986. 

The Lions raised over $25,000 in 1986 from 
just three fundraising events. The club also 
collected over 1,000 pairs of eyeglasses and 
15 hearing aids to benefit adults and children 
in underprivileged countries. 



SKidmore is looking torwara to serving as 
'the Lions president' during the 50th an- 
niversary year. According to Skidmore, "we 
are still looking at various projects for 1987. 1 
think we will take on a larger project this 
year to commemorate the Antioch Lions' 
50th anniversary." 

Other officers named during the in- 
stallation ceremonies are Kenneth Graesser, 
first vice president; Bruce Adams, second 
vice president; Lou Santini, third vice 
' president; Charles Cermak, secretary; Dr. 
John Boarini, treasurer; William Cardiff, 
lion tamer; and Ted Axton, tailtwister. 

Two year directors are Ernie Schyra and 
Dennis Willett and the one year directors are 
Mike Simmer and William Yucus. 



PM&L Theater Group 
Seeks Renovation' Aid 



by PATTY KOROM 

If only these walls could talk. An ap- 
propriate thought during one's first visit to 
the PM&L Theatre in Antioch. 

Built in about 1912, the theatre has 
provided entertainment, for many 
generations of Antioch residents. 

The original theatre was known as The 
Crystal Movie House and was part of the 
Ratnar Theatre curcuit. 

According to Ken Smouse of the Lakes 
Region Historical Society, the Ratnar 
Theatre group was a stock company that 
toured between about seven theatres in the 
area] 

The movies shown at the Crystal were 
accompanied by a piano played by the 
theater owner. An interesting story was told 
to Smouse concerning the piano player. 

It seems that the favorite way for some of 
Antioch's young boys to spend a Saturday af- 
ternoon was to attend the theater and 



•provoke the theater owner while he was 
playing the piano. 

The owner, who used a cane to walk with, 
would try to hit the boys with the cane and 
play the piano at the same time. 

Another interesting detail concerning the 
.Crystal was the way in which sound movies 
were provided to theater patrons. 

The owner of the Crystal owned more than 
one theatre and had only one sound camera. 
In order to provide soundm the owner would 
pack up this huge camera and haul it from 
theater to theater.. 

■ The movies were scheduled on a rotating 
basis with plays so that the camera was , 
heeded in only one theater at any time. 

In the 1940's, the Crystal was sold and 
became the Lakes Theater. The plays that 
had been provided by the Ratnar group were 
gone and the theater was to show only 
movies! 

(Continued on Page 3A> 






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2 A Lakeland Newspapers 



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y 15, 1987 



Beating, Stabbing Of 2 
er Investigation 




According to a newspaper source, there 
may be drugs connected to the beating and 
stabbing of a Lake Villa and an Antioch man 
at 4:24 a.m., on Thursday, Jan. 8, on Wilmot 
Rd„ near Rte. 173 in Spring Grove. 

Passersby reported that blood was pouring 
from a car the was off the road and the car 
showed no signs of having been struck by 
another vehicle. 

According to the McHenry County Sheriff's 
Dept. Robert E. Baker, 30, Lake Villa 
remains in serious to fair condition at Nor- 
thern Illinois Medical Center at press time. 



The other victim, Randy Knackstedt, 29, 
Antioch, was transfered to Victory Memorial 

Hospital on Thursday, treated and released 
from there on Saturday. 

According to the sheriff's department, the 
two men told police that they were coming 
from a bar in Fox Lake, traveling north on 
Wilmot Rd. when they were run off the road 
by another car and then several persons 
from that car beat and stabbed them. 

The incident is still under investigation by 
the sheriff's department. 



I AARP'S All American 
Band Goes On The Road 



by PATTY KOROM 

Antioch's Chapter 387 of the American 
Assn. of Retired Persons (AARP) probably 
has the only kitchen band in Antioch that is 
willing to goon the road. 

The 33-member AARP All Star Kitchen 
Band has entertained various groups 
throughout Lake County during the past 
year, including Cedar Village in Lake Villa; 
Winchester House in Libertyville; the An- 
tioch Historical Society and the senior 
citizens at Antioch's Senior Center. 

According to band director and AARP 
president, Sam Lombard©, the band is very 
versatile. Along with the usual kitchen band 
instruments, there are barbershop quartets 
and octets, soloists, and a yodeler. 

"We really have some talented people par- 
ticipating in the band, it's great therapy for 
everyone involved,"he said. 

The kitchen band is only a small part of the 
MRP's many activities. The organization 
has sponsored various food drives to help 
support local food programs and donated 
funds to Antioch's rescue squad. 

Many of AARP 's members have donated 



memorabilia to the Antioch Historical 
Society and the group has donated funds to 
support the society as well. 

The philosophy of the organization was 
summed up rather nicely by Lombardo. He 
said, "the best therapy for seniors is to be in- 
volved. I always tell people to stay away 
from the rocking chairs and the television. 
You have to be with people and talk with 
people." 

Lombardo's philosophy has worked well 
for many seniors. The oldest AARP member, 
Marie Beem, is 86 and she is an active mem- 
ber of the AARP All Star Kitchen Band. 

The AARP has met at various locations 
over the years, but with the construction of 
the Senior Center, they now have a per- 
manent meeting place. 

Along with President Lombardo, Dolly 
Spiering serves as first vice president, and 
Urban Reef is second vice president. The 
organization's secretary is Clara Haling and 
Robert Allgire serves as treasurer. 

Anyone interested in becoming a member 
of AARP Chapter 387 can call Sam Lom- 
bardo at (312) 395-4068. 



Lakes Carpet Provides 

Area's Biggest Selection 



by PATTY KOROM 

Imagine walking into a showroom, pushing 
10 buttons on a computer, and seeing your 
dream kitchen appear in color before your 
very eyes. 

When Lakes Co. Carpet and Tile opens its 
new location on Rte. 83, you will be able to do 
just that. 

Lakes will feature the Mannington Com- 
puter Center and offer an expanded line or 
carpets and vinyl floorcovering. The new 
store will also feature an extensive selection 
of parquet floor covering. 

Carpet will be purchased from 12 mills and 
three mills will be used to supply other floor 
coverings. 

Although floor covering is Lake's major 
emphasis, it also carries one of the biggest 
selections of wallcoverings in Lake County. 

Gene Voight, owner of the company, has 
been in business in the Antioch area for the 
past 15 years. 
Its first location was on the corner of Rte. 



59 and 173. After four years at that location, 
Voight moved to Hickory Commons, located 
on Rte. 173 across from Lyon's Ford. 

After 10 years at that location, his business 
was literally bursting at the seams, so he 
decided to build a bigger and better building. 

The new building will have 4,300 sq. ft. of 
warehouse and showroom space combined. 
After two moves, Voight decided to build 
with room to grow. 

"This is it," he said. "I built the building 
large enough so that we don't ever have to 
move again. I couldn't stand the thought of 
moving one more time." 

The showroom will be designed to provide 
the best possible lighting, enabling 
customers to view the true colors of the car- 
pet, vinyl, and parquet samples 

Hard work and "a wife who is simply won- 
derful" is what Voight attributes his success 
to. His basic philosophy, he says, is to "work 
very hard to back up what we sell. We want 
to provide the best service to our people." 

Li 




&nttocf) 

j£etos-&eporter 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

(USPS 027-080) 



New* Idi'tn I'Jiicia Webb 
K«om. '-'(31?) 2234161. 

OlipUf Adverting Sain: Oav- 
Kierna .{31? / 3161. 

Minified Mftrtising: Hugh 
lones. (312U2J-816I 

Corretpondent: Carolyn Ham- 
mond. (312) 395-6081 

Founded 1BB6. Combining the 
Antioch News and Antioch 
Reporter. 1965. 

Published every Thursday, second 
class postage paid at Artliocli. IL 
60002. 

Office of Pablrcifion: P 0. Box 
813. Main St., Antioch. IL 60002 
Phone (312) 395-8700. 

Hail Subscription Rates: $11.50 
Per Year by Mail paid in advance 
in Lake. Cook Kenosha an J 
McHenry Counties: elsewhere 
517.00 Per Year by Mail paid in 
advance. 

Foifmatfen Send address 
changes :o Lakeland Newspapers, 
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Regular edition, Retail Display advertising must be in the office of publication no late; than Mon- 
day at 5:00 p.m. Classified Display advertising must tie in the office of publication by Tuesday at 
1 1:00 a.m. Word Rate Classified will be accepted until 1 1:00 a.m. on Tuesday.. 

News Deadline 

Society News 5:00 p.m. Friday, Club Meeting News 5:00 p.m. Friday. Sports News Noon Monday 
Obituary 8:00 a.m. Tuesday, Business News 5:00 p.m. Friday. 




Winners of many 

State and Local 

Newspaper Awards 




Antioch's Coral Apartments 
Names Bushing Manager 



Coral Apartments, An- 
tioch South Plaza, and Dupre 
Enterprises have appointed 
David L. Bushing as general 
manager of their companies. 

An Antioch resident for 
over 40 years, his started in 
1952 with the ABcP Grocery 
chain. Working his way into 
management, he went into 
new store development and 
management with the M. 
Loeb Limited, Co. of Elk 
Grove and Evans ton. 



Bushing was associated 
with the Foremost Liquor 
chain in management in 
store development from 1966 
through 1986. 

He is past president and 
still an active member of the 
Antioch Lions Club, the 
board of directors of the Nor- 
thern Illinois Conversation 
Club, the Antioch Masonic 
Lodge, Ducks Unlimited, 
Muskies, Inc., and the Old 
Style Muskie Team. 
Bushing said, "Our com- 



munity is growing, many 
new and exciting projects 

are under way and many 
more are being planned. 

"I'm proud to be a part of 
them and the Dupre En- 
terprise famUy." 

Dupre Enterprises are 
headquartered in Denton, 
Texas. The Antioch office 
will be located at Coral 
Apartments, 764 Main St., 
Suite 101, Antioch. 



Theatre 

(Continued from Page IA) - 

■< During 1961-62, the theatre was to change 
once again. 

The P.M. and L. theatre group began their 
first season as Antioch's community theatre. 

Over the years, the theatre group leased 
the building on Main St. and last year, the 
decision was made to buy it. 

According to P.M. and L. President, Aileen 
Biel, "we have only been able to do main- 
tenance on the building the past. Now that we 
own it we are beginning to restore the 
building." 

Restoration to the theatre has been slow, 

and unless you're involved with the theatre, 

it's liard to understand the importance of 

some of the work. 

A new cat walk over the stage area will 

allow the group to use lighting in a different 

way and, according to Biel, "we could even 

do Peter Pan if we wanted to." 
Although the cat walk is the most exciting 

addition so far in the renovation process, the 

safely or the patrons is by far the group's 

main concern. 
The stairs leading to the buildings lower 

level have been straightened and reinforced. 

The lower level area of the building is used to 

provide patrons with refreshments during 

performance intermissions, 

The group has also renovated the restroom 
area and hopes to complete a handicap ac- 
ccsibte restroom area in the near future. 

Although these improvements aren't 
cosmetic, they are important and have to I:-- 



done before any moves are made to restore 
the theatre to it's original decor. 

One project that the group would like to 
undertake is the recovering of the theatre's 
scats. The seals, obviously worn with age, 
arc the original scats. 

"The renovation of the theatre is im- 
portant to Antioch," according to play 
director, Mickey Mandel, "there has been a 
lot of support from many businesses and 
residents." 

The cost to see a P.M. and L. production is 
extremely low at $4.50 per ticket. There are 
even special prices for senior citizens. Yhe 
theatre has over 800 season ticket holders. 

To date, the only funds used to renovate the 
theatre are play proceeds, and some from 
donations made by local service groups and 
businesses, Mandel stressed that there are 
many hours of volunteer work involved with 

the building's renovation. 
The P.M. and L.'s upcoming play "Angel 

Street" will begin on Feb. 6 and is directed 

by Mandel. 
The play has been billed as a spine chilling 

murder mystry and promises to provide a 

fun filled evening. 
The P.M. and L. group is always on the 

lookout for new talent. According to Mandel, 

"you don't have to be a resident of Antioch to 

participate, and you don't have to be a 

member of the theatre either. Just come and 

try out for a- production." 
Donations can be made to the P.M. and 

L.'s Building and Restoration Fund, P.O. 

Box 23, Antioch 60002. 



Sequoits Need More Wins 



» ■«■ » ' I"-** _ 

Survives factory Crash 

Tlmothv Fitiaerald* injured but alive, is taken from the debris of collapsed con- 
ISA^QSATLa Industrial Park, .TOJndustry's OT~^™^™ 
collapsed on Friday, kilting one worker and injuring two. - Photo by Gloria Davis. 



Antioch's boys basketball 
team will be hoping home 
cooking turns close calls into 
victories this weekend. 

Antioch, after a 42-41 hear- 
tbreaker at Fenton, hosts 
Zion-Benton and Warren 
Jan. 16 and Jan. 17, respec- 
tively. 



For Antioch, coach Don 
Zeman's team is looking for 
some much-needed vic- 
tories, as the Sequoits are 2- 
11 overall, 

** We need to keep our sites 
on the first division. We're 
only two or three games out 



Zeman said that at first 
glance, Warren, led by Brian 

Jarrell, would be the tougher 
of the two opponents. 

Part of Antioch's problem, 
Zeman said, is the team's 
losing ways. 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 3A 



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Schedule 

Achievers' 

Forum 

•me College of Lake Coun- 
ty Southlake Center is spon- 
soring an Achiever's Forum 
on Saturday, Feb. 7 from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. The forum, en- 
titled "Go For Bigger 
Results in 1387,*' will be held 
at the Hotel Morraine, 700 N. 
Sheridan Rd. in Highwood. 

Elaine Koch, president of 
Success Planning 

Associates, a consulting firm 
located in Chicago, will be 

the facilitator for the forum. 
The registration fee is $85 

and includes lunch. 

Enrollment is limited to 25. 

Registration for the 

Achiever's Forum (CON 101- 

001) will be taken until Jan. 

21. Call (312)433-7884 for 

more information. 

Protect 
Credii 

Consumers spend more 
than $80 billion each year on 
interest and other credit- 
related charges. But there 
are some ways an individual 
can reduce his interest ex- 
penses, according to J. Ken- 
neth Rosko, a financial plan- 
ner and registered represen- 
tative of FSC Securities 
Corp., (Member 

NASD,SIPC>. He offered the 
following tips: 

—Don't borrow unless it's 
absolutely necessary. 
—If you must borrow, look 
for inexpensive sources of 
credit, such as parents or 
family, a whole life in- 
surance policy, or a credit 

union. 

—Avoid credit life and ac- 
cident and health insurance 
sold as part of a loan 
package. 

— Avoid borrowing from 
finance companies and 
retailers. These creditors 
usually charge rates in ex- 
cess "of 20 percent, and 
sometimes over 30 percent. 

How much should one 
"spend" on credit? Ros-.c 
says that, in general, con- 
sumer debt should not ex- 
ceed 15 percent of one's in- 
come after taxes and 
bousing expenses. 

One way to protect one's 
credit rating is to first make 
sure the information in one's 
tile is correct, says Rosko. 

"Individual credit files, 
containing detailed in- 
formation about one's credit 
history, are maintained by 
literally thousands of credit 
reporting bureaus across the 
country. Under the Federal 
Fair Credit Reporting act, a 
consumer has the right to 
know what is in the tile," he 

said. 

To obtain a copy of one's 
credit file, contact the credit 
bureau in your area and ask 
them the procedure for 
either getting the file by mail 
or for making an office visit 
to inspect iL Be sure to ask if 
there's a fee. 

On examining one's file 
and finding something 
believed to be in error, one 
- has the right to dispute it, 
but is must be in writing. 
Credit bureaus are required 
to re-investigate and correct 
errors. If not satisfied with 
-the results of the re- 
investigation, one may sub- 
mit a statement of 100 words 
or less explaining why the 
report is believed to be inac- 
curate. This statement must 
appear in one's credit file. 

Rosko suggests that credit 
files be checked annually. 








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•7095 1 £L 




$8495 



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47,9»S miles. *™X*. 



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^^ScS*riw4Dr -84 Chevy C*m»o 

S». $ 6 595U^^ $ 9Q 95 




'77 6MC Suburtan 

v-8. $1295 

aulorratic. 



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'83 AMC COTCoritf W wn 77 C^^^*!?- 

$1295 



6 cylinder, 
automalic. A/C 



$ 4995 I aulorru 



^ n= -'^*^SF\ »m n-w r«^. ferftotti I '84MmnPioIup l '85 Chevy Cavalier 4 Dr. HI^^SSSe 

•79caevyCamaroZ28_ LH^^^JgJ |jjr $Jo95 '— $ 7995 lli^r *7495 



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Ctilfie 1 37.746 triles. 
9 2"#79 Iter-rf.strrMl. 




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«*f 4M> fff HWK WfflOW AM/fB THE DIFfERENCi 



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suiS-savKt -body shop -lasm 

CHEVROLET • 0LDSM0BILE - RV CENTER 







APPROVED 
AUTO REPAIR 





Thursday, January 15. 1987 



4 A Lakeland Newspapers 






I 

i 



Dining /En tertainmen t ■ 

Cast 95-AAembier Chorus In 'Moods Musical' 



An exciting ex- 
travanganza of great song 
hits will be presented by 
Gerry Traxler's Choral 
Dynamics on Saturday, Jan. 
17 and Sunday. Jan. 18- at 
Liberty ville High School. . 

The 95-member mixed 
chorus will entertain with 
"Moods Musical" in a Blue 
Note Cabaret setting for the 
18th annual winter musicals. 



Show times are 8 p.m. at 
the high school auditorium 
on Park Ave., Libertyvilie. 
The show opens with "WeVe 
Got a Show For You" and 
follows with a variety , of 
choral numbers, solo and 
specialty numbers under the 
direction of Traxler who 
started the non-profit 
organization 18 years ago. 

Favorite choral numbers 



include "Solitude," "The 
Nearness of You," "Lullaby 
of Birdland," "I Got Plenty 
of Nutting"' and "DidnH 
We." The ladies will burst 
forth with "Don't Sit Under 
the Apple Tree," 
reminescent of the popular 
World War II era number, 
with updated words. 

Two specialty numbers, 
"Flight of the Bumble Bee" 



i 

Opera To Feature Ragtime 



Entertainer Max Morath 
will appear at the Woodstock 
Opera House on Sunday, 
Feb. 1. The popular pianist- 
singer will present "Living a 
Ragtime Life," a musical 
glance at an earlier 
America, blending music, 
humor, and satire into a 
bright and affectionate look 
at another era. 

Morath will take the Opera 
House audience on a 
rollicking musical tour from 
the Gay Nineties to the 
Roaring Twenties, with 
many stops along the way- 
stops that reveal the fads 
and foibles of the time. 

The songs and piano solos 
in "Living a Ragtime Life" 
range as wide- as the con- 
tents of Morath's many 
record albums, from 
ragtime to show tunes, from 
novelty songs to the blues. 

In this one-man show 
("with a cast of hundreds") 
Morath is aided and abetted 
by a sassy old Edison 



r 

phonograph, and by the wor- py audiences and critical ac- 
ds, music and spirit of such claim in hundreds of cities 



immortals as Scott Joplin, 
Irving Berlin, George i M. 
Cohan, Bert Williams, fylay 
Irwin, and, of course!, a 
grand piano! 

Morath has played to. hap- 



throughout the United States 
and Canada. Said Walter 
Kerr of the New York Times, 
"Sheer delight! You'll find 
Max Morath a delectable 
companion." 



and "Used Car Lot" will be 
presented by ensembles. 

Accompaniment for the 
numbers is on piano and 
organ with a combo 
providing background for 
several numbers. Some 
numbers have been 



Correction 

Henry's Formalwear of 
Lakehurst will be providing 

formal attire for the Wed- 
ding Expo '87 bridal show on 
Sunday, Jan. 18 at Gurnee 
Holiday Inn. It was in- 
correctly reported that 
another concern would be in- 
volved. Henry's is managed 
by Michael Wynn. The error 
is regretted. 




EAGLE POINT PARK 

200 Eagle Point Rd., Fox Lake 
(312)587-8311 

SATURDAY 5-10 p.m. 

ALL YOU CAM EAT 



JAN. 16th, 5-10 p.m. 

Bring in this ad & 

receive a FRE-E Fish Fry 

of equal or lesser value 

v with each paid one. 



RIBS, SHRIMP & 
CRAB LEGS $|| 95 

Soap & Salad Bar 
Register to win dinner for twol 

REM EMBER J A N U R Y IT 15 BIRTH DA Y NITE 



J 



choreographed by youth of 
the group. 

As in the past a patriotic 
number will end the show, 
this selection being 
•'America the Beautiful." 

Tickets in advance are $5 
for adults and $3 for students 



under 12. At the door tickets 
are $6 and $(4. Tickets may be 
purchased] from chorus 
members jor cooperating 
organization members. The 
show is sponsored in 
cooperation withe Liber- 
tyvilie Wojmen's Club and 
Gurnee Lions Club. 



r IP - 



Super Sunday Brunch 

10:00 a.m. -3 p.i'm. 

Adults '5.95; Children (Under 9} "4.25 



Enjoy '4.95 Evening Dinner Specials & Shrimp 
Sunday Through Thursday i 



Luncheon Buffet Hon. thru. Fiji. 

Always 4 Hot Hems With Salad Bar 

Our Buffet Special Taco Bar, 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 

Only '3.95 



Saturday Specials • Also Full Menu 

Giant Steaks •BJ.Q. Ribs I 

Giant Crab Legs '10.95 • Lobster 

Special Prime Rib '8.95 • All Include Salad Bar 



Famous Friday Night Seafood & Rib Buffet 

*5.95 6p.m.-11 p.m. 

Early Bird Special *4.95, 4:30 p.m.-G p.m. 

Monday Thru Friday 4-6 

Draft Beer And Wloe 75* 

Bar Drinks *1 .00 



Rti. 1 20 ft 03 la GraytUk*, IL • (lift) 223-6800 



Under New Owdh 4V Management 



"»3 










,15,1967 




let timaet? fof 



■' 



lh 



"wrnoi 




Ross Johnson the reknown 
"PSYCHIC ENTERTAINER" 
who has appeared recently at the 
Chicago, will be performing |at the 
lower xvuuxxx ^ ww *-* ~i Friday, January 30th. Hte act ^wOl 
feature audience participation which will leave you PSYUtibJJ 
OUT" In addition the Tower Room will have a complete Prirne Rib 
& Chicken buffet dinner including Hors d' Oeuvres and Dessert. 
Reservations only. 015.00 per person Doors open 6:30 dinner at 
7-00, showtime at 8:30. Cash bar available. Please call (312) 395- 
1155 or (312) 395-1193. 

TOWER ROOM 

Hwy. 173, Antioch, IL 

(312)395-1155 (312)395-1193 



Lakeland Newspapers 5A 



y 









Thursday, January 15, 1907 



■ ■ 



..jt.i (eg"** ". 1 ^ '■ . ' .■« y gj-j ! j-~.- - 



ij n." " su^ wwoi i w. 



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Dinin d /Entertainment 

Countdown Until Expo 
'87 Fashion Show 



Schedule Jazz Festival 



Wedding Expo '87j is 
almost here and those 
wishing to attend shouldlcon- 
tact Debbie's Floral, Mun- 
delein, (312)949-4454: for 
reservations that can be 
picked up at the door of the 
Holiday Inn, Gurnee, orj Sun- 
day, -Jan. 18, the day the 
bridal show takes place 
there. 

At .Wedding Expo '87, 
designer styles wiljl be 
present, not only in the 
brides' and attendants* 
gowns, but also in the tuxs 
shown by Henry's For- 
malwear of Lakehurst. 

Henry's, located right in 
Lakehurst Mall, wiJll be 
featuring tuxedos designed 
by Pierre Cardin, BilllBIass, 
Robert Stock, some styles 
from the Robert Wagner 
Collection and others! from 
After Six. I 

According to M'ichael 
Wynn, manager of Henry's, 
the traditional black tux is 
still the most popular one, 



both in the regular tux style 
and tails. 

Winter white tuxedoes are 
also in demand and many 
weddings feature the groom 
and his groomsmen all in 
white with the ties and cum- 
berbunds matching the 
bridal attendants' gowns. 

"Antique ivory" is a 
special color that wilt be 
seen in male formalwear 
during upcoming wed- 
dings," added Wynn. 

The wedding show will be 
.sponsored by Debbie's and 
Lakeland Newspapers. 
There will be two bridal 
fashion shows at 1 p.m. and 
another at 2: 15 p.m. 

Bridal styles will come 
from Milady's Bridal, Bann- 
nockburn. 

Starting at 1 p.m. there 
will also be a fashion show 
featuring casual and resort 
wear, shown around the 
Holiday Inn's pool while a 
special brunch is being ser- 
ved. The resort wear will be 



To Host Special 
Olymp c Games 



The sixth annual Illinois 
Special Olympics Winter 
Games will be held Jan. 28, 
29 and 30. The winterjgames 
will be hosted by the[City of 
Galena, Chestnut Resort, 
Eagle Ridge Inn and) Resort 
at the Galena Territo|ry, and 
the Five Flags Skating Cen- 
ter in Dubuque, Iowal, 

The Illinois Winteij Games 
are very special because of 
the hundreds of JoDaviess 
County volunteers. The 
volunteers are adults, 
students, medical personnel, 
business executives and 
merchants. Each year they 
offer time, love and talent to 



help make the games a suc- 
cess. 

They provide athletes with 
outstanding emotional sup- 
port, of friendship and en- 
couragement. These winter 
games host 200 athletes from 
around the state. All Special 
Olympians strive to win a 
gold medal, however, each 
one takes the oath, "Let me 
win, but if I cannot win, let 
me be brave in the attempt." 

Eagle Ridge Inn and 
Resort is just six miles east 
of Galena on U.S. Rte. 20. 
Chestnut Mountain is eight 
miles south of Galena. All of 
which are just a short three 
hour ride from Chicago. 



Closed During January 

Will Re-Open Weekends In February. 



CHAPEL MIX 
COmRT CLIB 






2500 n. chapel hill rd. 
Mchenry. Illinois 

(815) 385-0333 



from the Hawaiian Shop of 
Evanston. 

Although both style shows 

are free, special reservation 

for the $12 per person brunch 

itself must be made by 

-calling <312)33fr«J0O. 

There will be booths where 
any -information on every 
phase of planning a wedding 
Will be available. 

Prizes, such as luxury 
cruises and vacations to the 
Caribbean will be given 
away during Expo, as well 
as free airline tickets. 

Perspective brides and 
grooms, members of their 
wedding parties, as well as 
family members are invited 
to attend Wedding Expo '87 
to ensure the perfect plan- 
ning of the perfect wedding. 

Tequila 

Tequila is obtained from 
the heart-sap of the mescal 
cactus. 



The Rockford Jazz 
Festival, one of the largest of 
its kind in the midwest, will 
be held Friday through Sun- 
day, Jan. 16-18; at the Clock 
Tower Resort, 7801 E. State 
St, in Rockford. 

The festival will feature 
more than 85 individual 
musicians and 20 different 
jazz bands from all over the 
country in the three-day jazz^ 
extravaganza. 

Highlighting. the roster of 
jazz musicians are jazz 
greats, Charley Ventura, 
Slide Hampton with the Nor- 
thern Illinois University 
Jazz Band, Wild Bill 
Davison, Bud Freeman, 
Bobby Haggart, and Eddy 
Higgons. Also on hand will- 
be Dave Remington, Chuck 
Hedges, John Bany and 
Johnie Faren, plus a wide 
variety of local jazz 
musicians and bands. 

The resort has designed a 
jazz package for, those jazz 
buffs who would like to spend 
an entire fun-filled weekend 
enjoying the best jazz music 



Live Entertainment 

Every Thursday 

7-10 p.m. 

This Week -Jan. 15th 






5419 Kenosha St. 
Richmond, IL 

Weddings 
•Banquets 

(815)678-2631 

(Rt. 173, 1 Blk. East Of lit. 12) 



around. For $275 per couple, 
the jazz weekend includes a 
deluxe room, admission to 
all jazz sessions, Saturday 
night dinner (gratuity in- 
cluded) with featured jazz 
stars, plus Sunday morning 
brunch at Figgs Cafe' or 
Bellamys. Admission to the 
-Time Museum, and a bottle 
of private label Clock Tower 



wine are also included. . 

For those jazz enthusiasts 
not staying at the resort, ad- 
mission is $10 for each of 
four sessions (Friday night, 
Saturday, Saturday night, 
and Sunday). To purchase 
tickets, make reservations 
or inquire about the second 
annual Rockford Jazz 
Festival, call (815) 398-6000. 



Home Economists Set Meeting 

The Greater Chicago Home Economists in Homemaking, a 
branch of the American Home Economics Assn., will meet at 
9:45 a.m. on Saturday, Jan.; 17, at Lincoln Center, 935 Maple 
Ave., Downers Grove. Following a brief business meeting, 
home economist Jean Lloyd, who is charge of the culinary 
program at Burhop's Seafood, will demonstrate ways to 
prepare fresh fish. All professional home economists, mem- 
bers of AHEA, are eligible to join. Guests are welcome. For 
further information, contact chairman Gail Pen- at (312)963- 
7624. 



WWHi 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 
(312) 395-0216 



Star Trek IV 

Dolly 6:45-9 



PC 



UU StSSH Yogi Bear Gobots 



1 



Sol. a Son.-Mon. 3.30 



4:15 



Mchenry i & 2 

(815) 385-0144 



$100 



1 



ALL sure 

ALL SIOWS 



CUHT EASTWOOD 

Heartbreak Ridge 



Dolly 6:30 9 



CHILCHKM't OOUBIM rtA TVRM 

Yogi Bear Gobots 



Sot. A f un.-Mon. 2:30 



4:13 



Three Am Igos 

Frl .-tuM..Ihuri. 7-* ! 

lot. * Sun.* Man. 3:30-4iM-r.f 



ALL TIMES LISTED AT THEATRES START FRIDAT 



LIBERTY 1 & 2 
(312) 362-3011 



1 1 m in surs 

tl M nWl JFTEBMM WW 

Crocodile Dundee 

Frl .. Tun. -1 hurt. 6:45 ? PC-II 
Sal. * Sun. • Man. 2:1S-4:30 -6:45-9 
tola Show Frl. t Sat. 10:0 

UMUwttt-l\MVkMiUlM«) 

II M flnr! Uhnw Stow StL I U*. 

UttU Shop Of Horrors 

Dally aX«.X - c , , 

tola Show Frl. * Sot. IQrlS 

CHIlDHIM'g OOUBLK rWATimt 



Yogi Bear Gobots 



Sat. * 5un..Mon. 9iM 



4:15 





Antioch Bowl 






Ladies Only 
No-Tap Tournament 

One Day Only - Sat. January 31st. 

/ out of 10 entries cash $ 500^ 1 St PiClCG 



I. Squad Times 
3 p.m. - 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. 



W&ifS&G^^ 



Based on 180 entries, 
Pro-ratted if less. 



BOWLERS AVERAGES are nol to have ex- 
ceeded 185 for the 1985-86 bowling season. 
SEE REVISED SIDE FOR ALL RULES. 



ATTENTION SQUAD ORGANIZERS 

ONE FREE ENTRY with every 15 paid entries. 

BREAKDOWN OF FEES: 



Entry Fee $ 1 5 

Call for reservations 



oo 



Prize Fee ......... $7.00 

BOWLING $4.50 

EXPENSES $3.50 

$15.00 




ITS SNOW FUN INC 

NOW^UBING 

I AT |MAPLEHURSf 

WE ARE MAKING SNOW DAILY 

•We Furnish The Tubes 
•No. Skill Or Training Required 

•Super-Fast Downhill Runs *r 

•SPECIAL GROUP RATES - CALL & MAKE RESERVATIONS 




Hours: 

Mon.-Fri. 5-10 

Sat. & Sun. 10-10 



Located On Wilmot Road V* Mile North Of Hwy. 173 In Spring Grove, IL 

(312) 395-1 128 & (815) 675-2558 



6A Lakeland Newspapers 



,««~^» ■ ■ I "w n ^ 



»i r m — ■^•-■yi»»J---i-*"-i^»>- ~>. 



f4 



— , — - »t»-«ir— ■ ■^ )i»iu«i ii > i <»m i t i ">iW « M'» m rti in wnw m. » )n m w » — , 



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i«ri«(SHrtaa!arBSswsL«S&*'* ia>Sss ^ s ' B * & " • 



- 



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IL 

8 



15.1987 




1984 Ford Tempo 

$5295 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$4295 Final Cost* 



only 



$ 117 



44* mo, 



'48 mo. @ 13.5% APR 



1983 Chevy Malibu 

$4895 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$3895Final Cost * 



1981 DatsunB210 

$3695 
Rebate -$1000' 



$2695 Final Cost 



* 



•I 




58 * mo 



*30mo.@ 24.25% APR 



ONLY 



$ 119 



61 * mo. 



*42mo.@ 14.25% APR 



1981 VW Rabbit 

$2795 
Rebate -$1000 

$1795 Final Cost * 



ONLY 



$82 



28 * me 



f 30 mo. @ 24.25% APR 



1 985 Ford Ranger 

$6995 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$5995 Final Cost * 



ONLY 




25* mo* 






*48 mo. @ 1 1 .75% APR 



1981 Chevy Chevette 

$2995 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$1995 Final Cost* 



ONLY 



$ 91 



23 * mo 



*30 mo. @ 24.25% APR 



1983 Nissan 

$4895 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$3895 Final Cost * 



$ 119 



ONLY 
61* 



*42 mo. @ 14.25% APR 



1981 PontiacTIOOO 

$2495 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$1495Final Cost * 



ONLY 



$ 68 



85* mo. 



*30 mo. @ 24.25% APR 1 



1 984 Ford Ranger 

$5995 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$4995 Final Cost * 



ONLY 



136 



39 



1980 Chevy Chevette 

$*99% 
Rebate -$1000 

$995 Final Cost * 



*48mo.@13.5% APR 
ONLY 



$ 56 



42" 

*24 mo. @ 27% APR 



1983 Ford Escort 

$3995 
I Re bate -$1000 * 

$2995 Final Cost* 

1 980 Chevy Monza 

J>2695* 
Rebate - $1000 

$1695 Final Cost 



ONLY 



$ A A27 mO. 

*42 mo. '® 14.25% APR 



1985 Chevy Chevette 

$4495 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$3495Final Cost * . 



ONI. IT 

72 mo* 



*9¥ 2 



1 985 Ford LTD 

$6895 
Rebate -$10Q0 

$5895 Final Cost 



* 

* 



*I55 



48 mo. @ 11.75% APRl 
ONLY 
63* 



»48mo. @H. 75% APR 



ONLY 



$ 94 



99 



1983 Buick Century 

$5895 
Rebate -$1000 * 

$4895 Final Cost * 



OMtr 



$ 149 



98* mo. 



'42mo.(S> 14.25% APR 



*24 mo.-@ 27% APR 



1981 Dodge Omni 

$2895 
Rebate -$1000' 



OMLY 



$1895 Final Cost 



* 



$ 86 



* 



76 mo. 



1 982 VW Rabbit 

$3995. 
Rebate -$1000 



$2995 Final Cost 



*30 mo. @ 24.25% APR 
ONLY, 



1982 Mazda GLC 

$3295 
Rebate -$1000 

$2295 Final Cost 



ONLY 



•k 
* 



$86 



* 



57* mo. 



*36mo. @ 19.75% APR 



1 980 Chevy Citation 

$2495^ 
Rebate -$1 000 

$1495Final Cost * 



ONLY 

$0361 



^24 mo. (3) 27% APR 



$ 112 50 

*36 mo. ©19.75% APR 



1 982 Ford Escort 

$1995 
Rebate -$1 000 * 

S995Final Cost * 



ONLY 

42* mo* 



$38 



*36 mo. @ 19.75% APR 




'Tax, Lie. & Title Additional 



Expires January 28, 1987 




m *> 



Hours: Daily 9-9, Fri. &Sat. 9-6" Service: Mon-Fri. 7^0 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Ponte 41 and Park Avortue Hjghlartil Jjark I 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 A 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1987 




"SIS ""•*^ 

C^JLJL VJL 



MP 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

The production that opens 
the winter theatrical season 
at Andre's Steak House Din- 
ner Theater, Richmond, is 
one wherein the kiddies are 
best left at home with a 
babysitter. 

And prospective attendees 
might also think twice before 
inviting their clergyman or 
prudish maiden aunt to join 
them. 

But for those who like to 
laugh at risque nonsense, 
"My Husband's Wild Desires 
Almost Drove Me Mad," 
might be just the ticket. I 
know that juicy prime rib 
served before the play was 
just the ticket to special 
culinary enjoyment. 

This is a spicey effort that 
opens with a bedroom thief 
hiding in a closet while the 
madame of the house(or 
apartment) try s to entice the 
building's maintenance man 
into a trist while her husband 
takes notes from the other 
closet where he is hiding 
dressed as a woman. 

The thief gets involved in 



this kinky nonsense and so 
does the Madame's sister. 

The lively cast's antics 
were appreciated by many 
members of the audience as 
they did not hoard their 
laughter, giggling away 
throughout the show. 

Bethany Evans, as the 
rather dull sister whose 
husband has taken off 
without her, steals the show 
with her animated facial ex- 
pressions. 

. Ruth Ann Bishop, a local 
Dolly Parton, looks volup- 
tuous enough and Gary 
Koon's unlucky burglar 
draws laughs galore. 

Don Crop as the strange 
husband and Jerry Collins as 
the janitor know their way 
around stage, (this time sort 
of a strange way around), as 
usual. 

The set design is a good 
one, producer and Director 
Ron Ferraro's efforts get 
more professional by the 
day. 

If whips with sex is where 
its at for you, run do not 
walk to Andre's. 



Sponsors Puppets 



The David Adler Cultural 
Center will present 
Chicago's Puppet Place in a 
production of "Peter Rab- 
bit" at 2 p.m. on Sunday, 
Jan. 18 at the Liberty ville 
High School Studio Theatre, 
708 W. Park Ave., Liber- 
tyvUle. 

This musical version of 
Beatrix Potter's famous tale 
is for children in preschool 
through third grade. 

The Puppet Place, one of 
the oldest puppet theatres in 
the midwest, is under the 
direction of Ray Nelson. A 
teacher, consultant and 
master puppeteer, Nelson 



received an Emmy in 1975 
for outstanding ac- 
complishment in children's 
programming for "The 
Magic Door" on CBS-TV. 

Admission to this 
children's program is $3 for 
adults and $2 for children. 
Tickets are available at the 
door on a first-come, first- 
served basis. Doors will open 
30 minutes before curtain 
time. 

The David Adler Cultural 
Center, 1700 N. Milwuakee 
Ave., Libertyville, is a non- 
profit organization. For 
more information, call 
(312)367-0707. 



Schedule 2nd Concert 



Continuing the theme of 
"Friends and Family," the 
Libertyville School of Folk 
and Old Time Music will 
sponsor a second concert 
and dance to celebrate its 
12th birthday. The musical 
party will be at 8 p.m. on 
Saturday, Jan. 17, at the 
American Legion Hall, 715 
N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Libertyville. 

Featured musicians will 
be Russ and Adam Avrid- 
son; Bonnie Biehl and Judy 
Morkrid; Doug and Molly 
Miller; Don, Marcia and 
Mary Morman; and Connie, 
Mike and Margaret Puree! 1 . 

After one (or two) last 
•oog(s) all together, 
musicians and audience 
members will clear the floor 
for an old-time barn dance. 

"It's Fer Reel" will 
provide the music and Bill 
Sudkamp will call, walking 
everybody through each 
dance first, so that no ex- 
perience is necessary to do- 



si-do the night away. 

The Libertyville School of 
Folk adn Old Time Music is 
part of the David Adler 
Cultural Center, 1700 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Liber- 
tyville. For more in- 
formation, call (312)367-0707. 

Accepting 
Art Slides 

Slides are now being ac- 
cepted for "Open Spec- 
trum," a juried fine arts 
exhibition. Artists working 
in the media of painting, 
sculpture, drawing, graphics 
or photography are en- 
couraged to participate. 

A prospectus detailing the 
exhibit can obtained by 
calling the David Adler 
Cultural Center at (312) 367- 
0707. Six Awards of Ex- 
cellence at $250 each will be 
made, as well as a "Best of 
Show" at $500. 



FREE 24 Hr. Phone Consultation 



Know Your Rights When, Arrested 

Experienced Lawyers Ready To Serve You In: 



•DUI 

•NARCOTICS 

•MISDEMEANORS 



(312)680-1190 



Suskin, Fetman 
& Menachof 

Law Offices . 
Libertyville, IL 




Bethany Evans 



Business Briefs 

Woman In Management To Moat 

The Lake Suburban Chapter of Women In Management 
will hold a luncheon meeting beginning at 11:30 a.m. on Wed- 
nesday, Jan. 21, at the Landings of Libertyville, 1290 S. 
Milwaukee Ave. Featured speaker Kathryn Riegler, of 
Management Skills management development firm, will ad- 
dress the group on "Influencing Others." Cost is $10 for 
members and $15 for nonmembers. Reservations and remit- 
tance may be mailed to Diane Haley, 21299 W. Lakeview Pk- 
wy., Mundelein, 60060; or call her at (414)396-4300 from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 

Present Ethnic Irish Seminar 

The Illinois Humanities Council and the South Side Irish 
Parade will host a program on "Chicagoland Irish and the 
Ethnic Neighborhood" at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 18, at the 
Irish American Heritage Center, 4626 N. Knpx St., Chicago. 
Several ethnic and Irish history scholars will speak on Irish 
immigration, cultural conflicts, and the present condition of 
ethnic neighborhoods In Chicago. Dr. Thomas Cunningham 
of Loyola University will serve as discussion moderator. For 
further information, contact George Hendry at South Side 
Irish, (312)238-1969. 



I 

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Located On Rt. 173 Just 'A Mile East of Rt. 83 

At Lyons & Ryan Ford. 



8A Lakeland Newspaper* 







■ 



^0^ 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

The Commmittee For the 
Incorporation of Liberty 
Lakes hit "another snag on 
Monday when Lake County 
Judge Harry 0. Hartel, Jr. 
denied its petition to declare 
the statute calling for Lake 
County Board approval on 
any incorporation taking 
place in the -county un- 
constitutional. 

According to one of the 
committee's founders Jo 
Garrett, they are not unhap- 
py about finding themselves 
at the appellate court level 



now that an appeal to Har 
tel's decision has been filed. 

"We expect the appellate 
court in Elgin to take a 
broader look at the question 
on a statewide basis," said 
Garrett. 

The hearing in front of, the 
Lake County courts was, 
slated to start on Thursday, 
Jan. "8. but from the begin- 
ning the Liberty Lakes group 
seemed to be in trouble. 

The petition was 
orgiginally scheduled to be 
heard by Judge Bernard 
Drew who withdrew because 
of a personal tie with the at- 



Association Honors 
25 Volunteer Aides 



Twenty-five individuals 
volunteered their time to the 
Northeastern Illinois Special 
Recreation Assn. < NISRA) 
on a regular basis during fall 

Tax Forms 
Available 

J.R, Starkey, Internal 
Revenue Service district 
director for northern Illinois, 
has announced that all 
federal income tax forms 
and publications arc now 
available through a special 
toll-free phone number, 
1800) 424-3676, weekdays 
between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 
Taxpayers should have 
already received their tax 
-packages; however, many 
people need additional forms 
or a publication to complete 
their return. 

Starkey emphasized that 
only forms and publications 
will be available by calling 
the new phone number. 
Individuals with tax 
questions or who need other 
assistance should call 
'-numbers listed in their local 
phone directory. 




, 130 Cflrfai A^e 

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lexsn^ Oi Cirfo Art. Oerween *1. 113 (Ciond A/«.) ■ 
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Monday tbtv TV»K*oy • q.m.-?>36 p.*n. 
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ILLINOIS AND SOUTHERN WISCONSIN HAS THE 

BIGfifcST DISCOUNTS. 



Thursday, January 1 5, \ 987 



torney ' representing the 
Village of Lake Villa, 
William Rosing. 

The hearing started on 
Friday at 9 a.m. in Judge 
Charles Scott's court. 

According to Garrett, 
Scott was not feeling well 
that morning and also had a 
very heavy case load so at 
10:45 a.m. he passed the case 
on to Associate Judge 
Wallace Dunn. 

At this point, Atty. Paul 
PhtllipstLindenhurst), Rosi- 
} ng( Lake Villa) and Assistant 
' States' Atty. Larry 
Clark(Lake County) asked 
for a change of judges 
because of a previous 
decision handed down by 
Dunn that disallowed ob- 



1986 programs. > The 
following people collectively 
donated over 397 hours of 
service to children and 
adults with special needs: 

From Liberty ville, Karen 
Balmes, Dawn Chapin, 
Patrick Doody, Dave Fiore, 
Heather Gustafson, Cindy 
Hahn, Peggy Jacobs, Laura 
Savage and Beth Seal.; Mun- 
delein residents Ann David* 
sen, George Forwe, Kevin 
Jeray, Bob LaMontagne, 
Norma Mendez, Heather 
Mohler, Mary Murray, Ann 
Marie Prefontaine, and June 
Teevin; Avon Twp., Cindy 
Butera and Diane Kumm; 
Ela Twp., Pam Beatty ; Lake 
Villa Twp., Gayle Florian; 
Warren Twp., Norma Mc- 
Mullin and Kim Krug; and 
Wauconda Twp. resident 
Mike Elliott. 

NISRA is an extension of 
the Mundelein Park & 
Recreation Disl., Vernon 
Hills Park Dist. and the 
village of Liberty ville. 

Volunteers are needed for 
winter/spring 1987 
programs. For mroe in- 
formation, call Mary Ber- 
man at (312)566-2277. ^ 



jections by Waukegan and, 
:Zion in the Beach Park in- 
corporation. 

Hartel was not prepared to 
hear, the case so he declared 
a recess. 

When the hearing recon- 
viened counsel for the in- 
corporation committee Atty. 
Newton Finn asked that the 
hearing take place with only 
the judge and the committee 
present but the attorneys for 
the villages and the county 
argued that their clients had 
interestes that would be af- 
fected by the judge's 
decision and they had the 
right to be heard. 

Hartel ruled in favor of the 
villages and the county and ' 
continued the hearing to 



Monday, 

At Monday's hearing Finn 
called the county board's ob- 
jections to the incorporation, 
based on "non-compliance 
with the county framework 
plan and insufficient tax 
base" arbitrary, saying that 
their were no ground rules 
set down on either of these 
compliances. 

Finn also said that a 
previous statement made to 
the media by member of the 
county planning and zoning 
committee, Delores Axelrod, 
after a hearing in front of 
that committee, had denied 
the incorporation group un- 
biased due process. 

In a radio broadcast 
Axelrod had said that the in- 



corporation of Liberty Lakes 
would. add no services and 
would do nothing to protect 
the quality of life of the 
area's residents. 

She reportedly added, 
"The new village will not 
have a planning staff and 
will lose lawsuits from 
developers because they 
won't have the staff or the 
municipal wherewithal! to 
invest." 

The incoproration 
proponents used these 
statements by Axelrod as a 
basis for the withdrawl of 
their incorporation petition 
from the county board level 
in December after which 
they filed in the county cour- 
ts. 







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1984 Buick Century 

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FOX LAKi i' ILLINOIS 



91 South Rt. 1 2, Fox Lake (31 2) 587-2555 



. Lakeland Newspapers 9A 



q 

i i 






■y 



-; 




On Tour 

The AARP All Star Kitchen Band prepares for a Satur- 
day morning 'jam session' at the Antioch Senior Cen- 
ter. Band members include: Director, Sam Lombardo; 
Pianist, Emily Novoty and members of the band in- 
clude: Art Aerne, Lori Aerne, Evelyn Albert, Agnes 
Allgire, Bob Allgire, Marie beem, John Brannen, 



Marge Bucar, Jim Capace, Al Courtois, Ellen Courtois, 
Clara Haling, Fritz Huesel, Marcalla Jesse, Larry 
Klimas, Irene Lingo, Phylis Mingler, Phylis Mingler, 
Virginia Necker, Edward Okoniewski, Fannie 
Okoniewski, Ruth Petterson, Dorothy Rockford, 
Charles Rytina, Jean Snyder, Dolly Spierling, and 
Dorothy Stacko. 



It's A Weighty Problem 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

Well the usual January blahs have set in 
and articles in the women's magazines, 
friends and relatives, plus my husband, have 
suggested thai I should get into a fitness 
program that might not only alleviate the 
blahs, but most or all eliminate the June Ha 
Ha's, That's their name for the expected 
reactions to the exposure of any part of my 
body between the wrist, the ankle and the 
neck: 

When I complained thai the cost of a health 
club membership was too high, those 
smarties pointed out that I had paid more 
than that for my last outfit from 
Omar'st Cheap al the price considering Ihe 
amount of ma tcrial used. ) 

I countered with the fact that I was much 
too busy to find the time to sweat and strain. 
Again, in the most humoring of tones, they 
suggested that the unconstructive time I 
spend watching those lovely bodies on 
"Dynasty" and "Dallas" might be better 
spent on personal reconstruction. 



and set-up a fitness schedule second to none, 
well maybe one or two. s 

I loaded the freezer with low-cal dinners, 
bought the usual low-cal snacks and 
beverages and vowed to view myself in the 
mirror, sans body covering, twice a day for 
incentive. 

The next step was to spend an hour in front 
of the swinging pendulum of our grand- 
father's clock repealing, "You'll never want 
food again, you'll never want food again, 
you'll never want food again. 

I packed away any outfit that had a touch 
of smartness and left out just Ihe largest and 
drabbest garb I owned, gauranteeing that I 
would hate, I mean despise the sight of 
myself in the mirror and would have no 
choice but to stick to the renovation 
program. 

As my checkbook flattened, the thought of 
turning myself into a TIF Dist, or asking 
President Reagan to declare me a national 
disaster passed through my mind, but I 
decided that the only slim thing about this 



When I Think About It 



Scouts 

Serve 
Pancakes 

The quarterly Court of 
Honor and Christmas parly 
for Scout Troop 190 of An- 
tioch was held on Dec. 14 at 
the American Legion Hall in 
Antioch. 

Entertainment included a 
short presentation of the 
year's monthly campouts 
and skits by the Troop's 
three patrols. Activilies 
discussed were a trip to the 
Museum of Science and In- 
dustry on Dec. 20, and a 
Super Bowl Sunday pancake 
breakfast at St. Peter's. 

The trotp is sponsored by 
St. Peter's Church and is un- 
der the leadership of Ken 
Wisniewski and Kevin Mor- 
tenson. The troop meets 
each Tuesday at 7:30 p.m in 
the American Legion Hall. 
All inquiries are welcome. 



Moose Women 
Have Good 1 986 



According to Senior 
Regent Theresa Grefkowicz, 
the Antioch chapter of the 
Women of the Moose ended 
1986 on a successful note.- 
Mooseheeart headquarters 
requires a membership 
quota to be completed each 
fiscal year ending June 30. 
The Antioch members have 
enrolled over the 50 percent 
mark with six months 
remaining to attain this 
year's goal. 

Two committees spon- 
sored successful projects 
during December: the Santa 
Breakfast served by the star 
recorder committee with 
Terry Smallwood as its 



chairperson; and Sarah 
Dykstra, leader of the 
library committee, held a 
white elephant and bake 
sale. 

Kathy Ladewig and the 
social service committee 
were hosts for the two 
December meetings and are 
planning the Valentine's Day 
dance to be held at the Moose 
home on Feb. 14. 

Recorder Louise Gutowski 
was named co-worker of the 
month. Besides having the 
most time consuming tasks 
in the chapter, Louise serves 
as "first lady" of the Antioch 
Moose as her husband, Joe, 
is its governor. 



Blood Drive 
At St. Peter's 



St, Peter's Catholic 
Church, 557 W. Lake Ave., 
Antioch, will sponsor a blood 
drive from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 31 in the 
school gym. 

The drive is being held in 
conjunction with the 
American Red Cross Blood 
Services of the Mid-America 
Region. 

The blood donaled through 
Red Cross at St. Peter's 
drive will be used to meet 
patient needs in hospitals 
throughout the Lake CV jnty 
and metropolitan area. 

Last year Red Cross 

collected nearly 85,000 units 
or whole blood, but was able 
to actually distribute more 
than 423,000 units due to 
modern processing 

techniques, which allow 
blood to be broken down into 
components to help as many 



as four or more hospital 
patients. Currently about 98 
percent of the blood 
collected by Red Cross is 
processed into components. 

The Red Cross is based on 
the concept of community 
responsibility, which means 
enough persons volunteering 
to donate blood will, always 
insure an adequate supply 
for anyone who needs it. The 
blood is donated by in- 
dividuals and persons in 
communily, church and 
business donor groups 
throughout the Lake County 
and metropolitan area. 

January is national blood 
donor month. Anyone bet- 
ween the ages of 17 and 65jj 
weighing at least 110 
pounds, and in general g 
health, is encouraged to 
donate. For information or 
to schedule a blood donor 
appointment call Ellen Ipscn. 




PHYSICIANS CENTERS 

Yo, You Cm Stop Smoking Today I 



500 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago 644-0666 

120 Oakbrook Center 
Oak Brook 57 l-2fcMi 

_ 64 Old Orchard Center 
SkokJe 679-5300 



So I was forced to go on a safari, hunting 
for a leotard that would fit. Take my word for 
it, this was not an easy task. It seems they 
only make exercise clothes to fit those who 
don't need to exercise. 

Boy, was I mad when I found out that they 
don't offer black full-body girdles, so I set- 
tled for the basic black short job, plus tights. 

Actually I don't really look that bad in 
.them — if you find the sight of "The 
Refrigerator" in a tutu passable. 

Neither wild horses, nor a thirst for 
slimness, could drag me to a public health 
club in that outfit. I wouldn't mind all the 
whispered "tsch tsch's," its that uproarous 
laughter emanating from those slime with 
planned bodies that I refused to face. 

So I embarked on a second search, this 
lime for a private health club, open at 3 a.m ., 
lo which only I had the key. This crusade too 
proved to be fruitless. 

Given little choice, I settled for the privacy 
of my home, a $19.95 tension spring with a 
handle and stirrups, dug out my old Slim Jim 
exercise chair, borrowed my son's exer- 
cycle, rented Jane Fonda's killer video tapes 



deal was my chance of receiving govern- 
mental funds to pay for it. 

And I must say I have seen the proof of the 
puddinglwish it was chocolate!). Where 
there's a will — , R's been one whole week 
and I'm already up to the second aerobics 
movement on Jumping Jane's ta pet that 
woman's insane!), I haven't cheated on my 

diet — well maybe just a teensy bit, and I can 
do my situps without that "ready to explode" 
look. I'm now in the pending heart attack 
phase. 

Like a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, 
I'm taking" it a day at a time, marking the 
days off on a chart on the wall above my 
bathroom scale, in the room that I have 
renamed Auschw i tz. 

But I'm beginning to wonder if this fitness 
stuff is what it's cracked-up to be. I feel 
terrible. I still ache in muscles I didn't even 
know I owned, my stomach is on a continuous 
rumble and worst of all, I spend a lot of time 
hallucinating that I'm diving off a mountain 
of butter pecan ice cream into a huge pool of 
hot fudge and someone keeps rescueing me! 



St. Peter's To Hold Luncheon 



St. Peter's Council of 
Catholic Women will sponsor 
"Luncheon Is Served" at 
noon on Tuesday, Jan. 20 at 
St. Peter's. 

The fundraiser is open to 
the public. Working people 



may come during the noon 
hour lunch period! .Tickets 
are $3. 

All proceeds from the lun- 
cheon will be donated to St. 
Peter's Church Renovation 
Fund. 



Tickets may be obtained 
from Ceil Jordan, president; 

Lucy Altman, chairlady; 



Lorraine 

chairlady; 

member. 



Kurinec, 
or from 



co- 

any 




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10A Lakeland Newspapers: 



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Thursday, January 15. 4987 






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B 



Expect Lawsuit To Enjoin 
County From Hearings 



j 



by CHARLES JOHNSTON 
Managing Editor 

I HAVE LEARNED from 
a knowledgable source that a 
suit was expected to be filed 
in the Lake County Circuit 
Court at 9 a.m. Wednesday, 
Jan. 14, to enjoin Lake Coun- 
ty from holding hearing on 
the landfill applications of 
Waste Management and 
ARF Landfill Corp. Ex- 
pected to be named in the 
suit are Lake County, Waste 
Management and ARF. 



ELLIOTT BACALL, WHO 

was once a candidate for the 
Republican nomination for 
Lake County Slate's At- 
torney, has apparently not 
made many friends among 
his colleagues in the legal 
community. 

He applied for an opening 
as an associate judge in the 
Lake County Circuit Court. 
All told, 13 attorneys filed 
applications for the spot. 
When the Lake County Bar 



flff 



Just 
Politics 



m 



Details were sketchy at 
press time, so it was unclear 
whether the suit is an effort 
to halt the process altogether 
or to alter who will be the 
responsible agency for con- 
ducting hearings on the ap- 
plication. 

There has been much con- 
cern that Lake County would 
have a conflict of interest if 
it heard- the applications, 
because its settlement on the 
Heartland lawsuits is con- 
tingent upon Waste 
Management receiving ap- 
proval for its proposed land- 
fill. 



Assn. was polled, Bacall was 
clobbered. He received oply 
one highly recommended 
vote, nine recommended 
votes and 118 not recom- 
mended votes. 

Perhaps he should hire a 
public relations firm. 

THE SELECTIVE SER- 
VICE sent a reminder out 
that many men who were 
supposed to register for the 
draft in 1981 are going to turn 
26 this year. The feds remind 
those that have not 
registered that if they do not 
do so before their 26th bir- 



thday, they will permanently 
lose the right to benefits such 
as student aid, job training, 
federal employment and, in 
some states, entrance to a 
state college and permission 
to practice law. 

Even men who served in 
the armed forces, but did not 
register for the draft, could 
lose these benefits. Those 
who are 26 or older are no 
longer eligible for the draft. 

So you folks that were sup- 
posed to register but didn't, 
you better get to it. 

I don't know why people 
were so reluctant to register 
when the draft returned. 
While I was in high school 
the Vietnam War raged on. 
Even the draft resisters, for 
the most part, registered 
during that time (If you 
didn't register, you didn't 
get a draft card to burn for 
the TV cameras, so resisters 
were more particular about 
registering than the average 
Joes.) 

What the heck, I 
registered at a time when 
annual visions of being 
assigned to jungle combat 
zones haunted me and my 
peers at lottery time. For 
those too young to remem- 
ber, winning the lottery in 
those days did not make you 
a millionaire, it put you at 
the top of the list of those to 
be called. 



■ 

■ ■ ■• 



Refinance 

MORTGAGES 

Did you know a $75,000 mortgage at 12% 
amortized over 30 years would cost you in 
interest $50,691 over a 9V 2 % fixed rate loan? 

LOANS FROM 8 } A % A.P.R. 30 Vr. Fixed 

BENEFITS 

■ Get cash out of Refinancing 

■Lower your monthly payments 
considerably in most cases. 

■ AND SAVE all that interest! 

Phone today! Hurry though, interest 
rates will go up soon. 

(414)889-4351 

M-F 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 

WESTERN MORTGAGE 
& FINANCE, INC. 



. 



Of 
Wisconsin 



Of 

linois 



Judge Lifts Injunction 
Off Saddlebrook Farms 




t^t: 



by SUSAN MONTGOMERY 
The Lake County Circuit 
Court has dismissed an 
injunction prohibiting the 
developers of the 4,800-unit 
Saddlebrook Farms mobile 
home park in. Round Lake 
from selling or leasing any of 
the units. 

Circuit Judge Bernard E. 
Drew ruled Monday that the 
plaintifs, a group of Fremont 
Twp. property owners, 
"have not demonstrated a 
likelihood success on the 
merits" and the temporary 
restraining order entered 
Oct. 29 be resolved. 

The injunction had also 
ordered that the DWG Corp., 
Saddlebrook developers, 
could precede* with con- 
struction at their own risk; 
The 865-acre site is located 
at Fairfield and Peterson 
Rds. 

The property owners 
contended that the permitted 
uses of the site, which in- 
clude two and three- 
bedroom mobile homes, a 
shopping center, two 
package liquor stores, and a 
restaurant are incompatible 
with the surrounding 



property. 

They also charged that 
residents were given little 
notice prior to annexation of 
ihc site and that the 
development will depreciate 
the value of the surrounding 
property. 

DWG . spokesman Jack 
Lavin said, "We said all 
along that we felt we would 
be successful in court. Now 
we'll continue at greater 
speed." 

Lavin also said that DWG 
will begin a stronger push on 
marketing the mobile home 
units. 

One factor that ruled in 
Saddlebrook's favor, he said, 
was that the property had 
been zoned for multi-family 
units 10 or 12 years ago. 

"(Drew) remarked, what 
have these people been doing 
all these years," said Lavin. 

In December, developer 
Charles Fanero, DWG 
president, had indicated that 
he would seek a settlement 
for the damages caused by 
the injunction. Lavin only 
said Fanero is now con- 
ferring with his attorneys 
about this possibility. 



i 



t 






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DRIVEN 

CHRYSUR 
Lf BARON GTS 












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■-- : 



MONTH 









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FURLAN'S 



DUG OUT 

REOPENING SPECIAL! 
FRI. & SAT. - JAN. 16 & 17 

• mm . I-'. 

"FREE" BEER 6-9 p.m. - $2.00 ENTRY 
DJ.& DANCING 

SOFTBALL & VOLLEYBALL SNOWBALL TOURNAMENTS 
STARING JANUARY 30th. CALL (414) 862-9936. 

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'85 COLT VISTA WAGON 

Automatic, all, llko new. Siock 11117 



'81 VW VANAG0N 

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Lakoland Newspapers 1 1 A 



Thursday, January 45, 1987 



i 






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-«--w»i-/ 




Superbow/ Of Science 



The trophy for first place in Argonne National Laboratory's High School Science 
Bowl is readied by Argonne Director Alan Schriesheim and Juanita Thomos of 
Argonne's division of educational programs. The Argonne Science Bowl will pit 48 
teams of Chicago area high school science students against each other in a battle 
of brains and scientific knowledge for the regional science championship. 



Little Oppos 
In Township 

The entire present Bristol Twp. Board, the 
office of clerk and treasurer and the 
positions of constable are all open on the 
April 7 general election ballot. 

Chairman Noel Elfering and Sups. Russell 
Horton and Don Wienke have filed to keep 
those seals. They and Clerk Gloria Bailey 
will be running unopposed. Geraldine Merten 
will be running unopposed for the treasurer's 
seat now held by retiring Doris Magowitz. 
Constables Robert Bohn and David Bundy 
are running for reelection and Randy 
Hansche is going after the other constable's 
job now held by Christopher Keeffer. 

Randall Twp. Chairman Thomas Zeiger 

will be opposed by Kim Singelton and First 

'-) Sup. Robert Gehring will be opposed by 

Phyllis Johnson. Second supervisors Robert 



ition 
Races 



Gehring and Maria Auguslyn will be 
challenged by Phyllis Johnson and Mike 
Epping. Clerk Phyllis Kaskin is unopposed in 
her try to retain th seat she has held for 19 
years. Julie Horbach will try to unseat in- 
cumbent Treasurer Rose Podella and 
Constables Ron Petersen and Fred Sar- 
backer are unopposed. 

In Salem Twp., Twp. Chairman Richard 
Stetson will reseek election unopposed. Sups. 
Josephine Weidman and Jospeh Meier and 
newcomer Albert Johnson will be running for 
the two open supervisors' scats. Clerk 
Sandra McCormack and Treasurer Barbara 
Schmitt have filed to run for their seats and 
are unopposed. Ed Nowicki is also unopposed 
in his try for the municipal's judge's seat 
vacated by Eugene Briggs. 




School Board Races To 
Be Almost Academic 



In the school board elections to be held on 
the April 7 ballot, at Bristol Consolidated 
Grade, School there are three seats open on 
the board of education. Having filed by the 
deadline of Jan. G. running for the three 
board members seats "will be incumbents 
James Coleman and Richard Bizek, Karen 
Kiefer. Alcinda Kordccki and Brian 
Backstrand. ^ 

In the Central High School Bard election, 
up on the ballot will be the seats of the Paris 
and Salem representatives. Incumbents Ben 
Ziehem and Richard Hnrtnell have filed to 
retain those sea Is. 

Rosemary Dietschwcriler will be the ony 
one running for the presdient's seat which 
she presently holds at Lakewood Grade 
School. Twin Lakes. 

Incumbents Jan Iselin and Tom Zeiger are 



Hooking -Em At The 'Hawg Trough' 

Larry Richter will bring his 42-ft. glass and steel 'Hawg Trough' to the Chicagoland- 
Sport Fishing, Travel and Outdoors Show Jan. 30 through Feb. 8 a1 the O'Hare Expo 
Center In Rosemont. Richter, Tony Portincaso, Dave Csanda, Spence Petros and 
other experts will demonstrate largemoulh bass catching techniques every hour 
throughout the run of the show: 

12A Lakeland Newspapers 



the only onus running for the scats they now 
hold on the Randall) Consolidated Grade 
School Board. 

At Rivervicw Grade School in Silver Lake, 
incumbents John Schmalfeldt and Esther 
Thornton are runing for reelection and will 
run unopposed. 

Delores Pagel and Thomas Seep should 
have an easy time of getting reeelcctcd to the 
Trevor Grade School Board since they too 
are running unopposed. 

No one wants to fight Linda Orvis in her bid 
for retention of her position at Wilmot Grade 
School as board president. 

There will be three open board member 
seats up on the April 7 ballot at Wilmot High 
School. Filing to run for those seats were 
William Huston, Joellen Krpll. Jerome 
EppingandElainLuedke. 



New Law To Boost Number 
Of Organ Donors In Stafe 



Several hundred Ilinois 
residents could receive a 
new lease on life this year, 
thanks to a new state law 
that encourages organ 
donations. Under this law. 
which went into effect Jan. 1 , 
the number of organs 
available for life-saving 
transplant operations could 
increase dramatically as 
hospitals ask the relatives of 
patients who die to donate 
organs and tissues of the 
deceased. 

Over the past several 
years, the number of suc- 
cessful organ transplants 
has increased rapidly due to 
new drugs and improved 
medical techniques. People 
who several years ago would 
have died, now can lead 
healthy, productive lives 
after undergoing operations 
to transplant kidneys, 
hearts, livers and other vital 
organs. , 

But as the number of 
transplants has increased, a 
serious shortage of organs 
and tissues has developed. 
Efforts to publicize the need 
for such donations have 
resulted in a slight increase 
in donors, but the demand 
for transplants still greatly 
exceeds the supply of 
organs. Because of this 
many people waiting for 
transplants die before 
organs become available. 

To help increase 
donations, the new law 
requires hospitals with 100 
beds or more to ask the 
families of people who die in 
their facilities to consider 
allowing one or more of the 
deceased person's organs to 
be donated for medical 
transplants. Hospital of- 
ficials must contact the 
"highest priority" relative 
available and ask if that 
person "would consider 
allowing some or all of the 
victim's organs to be 
donated. Highest on this 



priority list is the spouse of 
the deceased, followed by an 
adult son or daughter, 
parent, adult brother or 
sister, or legal guardian. 

Hospitals are not required 
tr> make the donation 
requests when the person is 
apparently not a suitable 
candidate for organ or tissue 
donations, when the person 
has indicated previously that 
he or she did not wish to be a 
donor, or when there is 
reason to believe an 
anatomical donation is 
against the family's 
religious beliefs. 

Officials believe that the 
new law could result in a 
doubling of the supply of 
internal organs available for 
transplants in 1987. Based on 
results in other states with 
similar laws, the number of 
corneas donated in Illinois 
could triple. 

All of this spells good news 
for many people awaiting 
trausplants--and that 
number is getting higher all 
the time. Each day in the 
U.S. at least one heart, 60 
corneas and 20 kidneys arc 
transplanted. But for every 
transplant performed, 
thousands of others could 
benefit form similar 
operations. In fact, it is 
estimated that as many as 
14,500 people would be 
helped by a heart transplant, 
4,000 to 5,000 from liver 
transplants, and 13,000 from 
kidney transplants: - " ^ — 

With the implementation 
of this law, Illinois joins 28 
other states that have 
established similar organ 
donation request- 

requirements. In October of 
this year, a federal law with 
similar requirements will 
lake effect. While hospitals 
that don't comply with 
Illinois' law won't be 
penalized, those that don't 
follow provisions of the 



Childcare Information Meeting 

Learn how to start a home child care business/through a 
child care provider's information meeting. at 7 p.m. on 
Friday, Jan. 16, at the Avon Twp. Center, 433 E. Washington 
St. in Round Lake Park. Sponsored by the YWCA or Lake 
County, the meeting will offer information on subjects 
related to child development and business-related aspects of 
child care. There is no charge, and refreshments will be 
served. For more information, contact Eleanor Seegren at 
the YWCA, (312)662-4248. 

To Provide Academy Information 

Students or parents who are interested in the Illinois Math 
and Science Academy for gifted and talented students are 
invited to an informational meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, 
Jan. 15, at Adlai Stevenson High School auditorium, Rte. 22, 
Prairie View. Dr, Lou Ann Smith, dean of admissions and 
research at the academy, will speak on the admission 
procedure and applicant qualifications. For more in- 
formation, contact Ruby Payne at (312)223-3400. 



federal law will risk losing 
federal funds. 

Over the past several 
years, the Illinois General 
Assembly has passed 
several laws to help persons 
in need of transplants. Those 
laws, combined with this 
new push to increase organ 
donations, should help en- 
sure a brighter future for 
many in this state. 

Feeding 
Hungry Is 
A Big Job 

Each year thousands of^ 
baskets of food arc donated 
to needy Lake County 
families at Thanksgiving, 
Christmas and Easter. 
Without the assistance- of 
food pantries and other 
groups who help the needy, 
holidays would be very bleak 
indeed. 

The Urban Advisory 
Council of the Cooperative 
Extension Service is 
preparing a directory of all 
groups and agencies in the 
county that collect and 
distribute food to low income 
residents at holidays and 
during the year. 

The directory, when 
completed, will help 
agencies with referrals, 
sharing of surplus food, aid 
in avoiding duplication of 
"services and help agencies 
act as a unified whole for 
purchasing, publicity and 
overall coordination of 
activities. 

Some of the problems the 
group will address are: 
—Planning baskets and 
supplies to meet the tastes 
and needs of ethnic clients. 
—Donations of foods that are 
not popular, useable or 
nutritious. 

—Food safety and handling, 
especially of meal and 
poultry products! * 

—Low income clients often 
have limited cooking skills 
and minimal -cooking 
equipment available. 
—Finding enough food for 
clients. 

All county groups that 
serve low income clientele 
and wishing to be listed in 
the directory are invited to a 
council meeting on Monday, 
' Jan. 26 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the 
Cooperative Extension 
Auditorium, 33020 N. Rte. 45, 
. Grayslake. 

~~~ For more information 
about the council or the 
directory,- call home 
economics adviser Barbara 
Dahl at (312) 223-8627. 



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Thursday, January 15,1 987 



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Hearing Expected Soon On Future Of Campbell 



The public will be given 
ample opportunity to speak 
out on plans to expand Cam- 
pbell Airport for increased 
commercial use. 

That assurance was given 
by Mayor George Scherer of 
Round Lake Park, prime 



mover behind efforts to ex- 
pand and upgrade Campbell, 
which is located south of 
Round Lake Park and 
Grayslake. 

Mayor Scherer said public 
hearings are required as 



/part of the application for 
federal and state funds. 

"Our- first official hearing 
should be held soon," 
declared the mayor, who has 
been working closely with 
Burke & Associates, 
nationally known airport 



consulting firm which is 
preparing a feasibility study 
on the potential of Campbell 
for commercial purposes. 

A preliminary hearing was 
held last fall on Campbell, 
which has been serving 



basically recreational flyers 
since it was established 
nearly 30 years ago. "I 
believe the initial hearing 
went well," Scherer ob- 
served. 

Mayor Scherer and a 



small band of general 
aviation enthusiasts feel an 
expanded Campbell Airport 
will serve growing com- 
mercial needs for the entire 
west Lake County and 
eastern McHenry County 
areas. 



— 



|3- Z 



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Editorial 



Avoid Landfill Hysteria 



Plans for expansion of the mid-county lan- 
dfill to include a state-of-the-art £ olid waste 
incineration system are generating in- 
creased interest and more than a little con- 
fusion. In short, the general public knows 
very little about the project, but some people 
are talking a lot about how the soli d wastes of 
our locality should be disposed of. 

Mayor Colin McRae of Mundelein made a 
lot of sense in commenting on Lhe project 
while at the same time taking to task Trustee 
Ralph Rohling, who called the site, located 
between Mundelein and Grayslake, the 
future "dump" of the North ShoreL 

"Any landfill in this area is not just for the 
North Shore, but for us, too," declared 
Mayor McRae. How true. The landfill at 
Rtes. 83 and 120, operated by ARF Landfill 
Corp., has been there more than 20 years and 
serves a large number of comlmunities in 
both Lake, Cook and McHenry counties. 

Technically, the incineration part of the 
expansion program is known as a resource 



A Place For Death 



recovery center. A combination government- 
public group, the Lake County Solid Waste 
Advisory Committee, now the Lake County 
Joint Action Waste Agency, has been 
studying disposal needs for three years. It is 
getting ready to receive a formal proposal. 

Committee members have done yeoman 
service. It is to be commended. We feel 
strongly that their recommendations will 
serve Lake County for well over 20 years. 

As Mayor McRae cautioned, hysteria is to 
be guarded against. Both concerned citizens 
and public officials should approach 
proposed solutions to the crying need for 
waste disposal answers with an open mind. 

Interestingly enough, Libertyville flanks 
the landfill area through a finger annexation 
some years ago to pick up industrial proper- 
ty at Rte. 45 and Peterson Rd. Maybe con- 
cerned citizens in Grayslake and Mundelein 
can assuage their emotions somewhat by 
referring to the project as "Libertyville's 
dump," 



Kenosha County Sheriff Freld Ekornaas 
made an eloquent plea for the death penalty 
in dealing with the brutal murder of his 
nephew and another youth in connection with 
a holiday gasoline station robbery. The 
youths were beaten and stabbed and left to 
die when their assailants set! fire to the 
building. Two young men quickly were ap- 
prehended and charged with first-degree 
murder. They face a maximu n penalty of 
life in prison plus 70 years. 

In discussing the case wih newsmen, 
Sheriff Ekornaas called for Wisconsin to 
adopt the death penalty. If sent to prison, the 
accused murderers would be eligible for 
parole about the time they reac h middle age. 
The death penalty is legal in 111 nois. 

The sheriff said, at the very least, people 
committing violent crime should be sen- 



tenced to life without parole. "We should not 
try to rehabilitate them. They should just sit 
there and rot." We couldn't agree more with 
Sheriff Ekornaas. In a time when savagery 
and mindless brutality are becoming more 
common all the time, society needs the 
ultimate weapon-the death penalty-to 
protect itself against beasts who are 
masquerading as human beings. 

As the bereaved sheriff put it, "No family 
should have to suffer with this kind of pain 
knowing the person who did it lives." 

There was a time when we argued against 
the death penalty as being both inhuman and 
economically wasteful. Our minds have been 
changed by the jungleism that lurks 
everywhere. The death penalty has a place 
and it should be used without shame when 
needed. 



Capricious Mother Nature 



Just when it looked as if we'd be ex- 
periencing a snow-less winter, Mother 
Nature reverted to form and delivered a 
generous helping of white stu f to remind us 
that it's still January and not mid-April. 
Welcome to winter. 

Whether this area ever experienced a win- 
ter with no snow isn't known, but we've been 
around long enough to kno.v that it isn't 
unusual for this part of the world to enjoy a 
winter with relatively milcl temperatures 
and virtually no snow. To counteract any 
belief that the winter of 1986-87 is unusual, we 
vividly recall a year when normal cold 
weather and snow didn't arrpve until the lat- 
ter part of January. 

That was the season am uncooperative 
weatherman knocked out what was being 
billed as the Midwest's first major winter 
carnival, an event that was envisioned to 
rival shindigs in St. Paul and other northern 
climes where winter is assi red. Larry LeaJ> 
blad, now a well-known local radio per- 
sonality and popular bandlteader, conceived 
the Fox Lake Festival on lee for the 1965-66 
winter while an enterprising young ad- 
vertising executive for this newspaper and 
the associated Lakeland Newspapers. Leaf- 
blad and his committee put together a fun 
weekend for early January that included 
family ice skating, tobogganing, queen con- 
test, cold weather style show and two dances 
that would serve as a backdrop to ABC 
television's national telecasting of the In- 
ternational Ice Boating Races on the Chain 
O'Lakes. The committee had every con- 
ceivable detail organized except one. There 



was no guarantee for ice and snow. As it tur- 
ned out, the lakes didn't freeze that winter 
with safe ice until the end of January. The 
Midwest's "first major winter carnival" also 
was the last winter carnival in these parts. 
Blame a capricious Mother Nature. Don't bet 
on an old-fashioned winter being a sure thing 
around here. Because it isn't. ■ 



OFFTriEMMl!- 




Lakeland Editorial 



Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 
Bi-State Reporter 
Fox Lake Press 
Grayslake Times 

M.R.SCHROEDfeR 
Founder -1904-1 986 



Gurnee Press 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 



North Chicago Tribune 
Round Lake News 
Warren-Newport Press 
Wauconda Leader 



WILLIAM M. SCHROEDEip 

General Sales Manager 



WILLIAM H.SCHROEDER 
Publisher/President 



WILLIAM LONERGAN 
Production Manager 



CHARLES JOHNSTON 
Managing Editor 



HUGH JONES 
Classified Manager 



Editor's Viewpoint 

How Area Gains 
1 00 New Jobs 
After Dark Day 




byBILLSCHROEDER 

Chicago's loss is Lake County's gain— 250 
new jobs! 

The interesting part about the jump for- 
ward in local employment opportunities is 
that it came about without involvement of 
the federal or state government, thank you. 

The job advancement resulted through a 
three-way cooperative effort involving the 
public and private sector with old-fashioned 
American boosterism provided by the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Here's what happened as 
the chain of events came to this column: 

Fansteel Corp. announced the closing of a 
division in North Chicago with a loss of 150 
jbbs. Bad days ahead, agreed Mayor Bobby 
Thompson and Robert (Bob) Byrne, 
president of the North Chicago Chamber of 
Commerce. What to do? Both also agreed 
that a boarded-up factory building would be 
undesirable. Time for action, urged Byrne, a 
public spirited citizen who has a world of con- 
tacts in the fields of business and govern- 
ment. Byrne knew of a plant in Chicago 
whose owners were disenchanted with their 
environment and were looking at a site in In- 
diana. Before the snap of a finger, Mayor 
Thompson and City Clerk Tim Miller were on 
their way for an appointment to throw out the 
welcome mat for Lake County and extoll the 
virtues of North Chicago., 



Thompson and Miller were able to con- 
vince Chairman Roy Cross that he should 
look at the soon-to-bershuttered Fansteel 
facility for Federal Die Casting's new home. 
The next step was getting Federal Die 
Casting management to look over the local 
scene. It didn't take Cross long to reach the 
decision to relocate to North Chicago. The 
bottom line for local employment: Fansteel 
loss, 150 jobs; Federal Die Cast gain, 250 
jobs. Net gain, 100 jobs. 

"This is a case of local people taking a "we 
oughta do" attitude instead of looking for 
help from Washington or Springfield," Bryne 
remarked. "The city, the Chamber and 
private industry working together resulted in 
a new business finding a suitable home. No 
inducement, no gimmicks. Just bringing 
people together and giving them the facts 
plus letting them know they're welcome. 
This is great. The important thing to know is 
this system works. And it can work again," 
enthused Byrne. 

As a political activist, Byrne couldn't help 
but chuckle over the fact that a Democratic 
mayor and a staunch Republican, Roy Cross, 
were instrumental in finalizing the move. 
"No politics here, just work and neigh- 
borliness," Byrne summed up. Call it high 
level bi-partisanship. 



Letters To The Editor: 



Keep Seatbelt Law 

Editor: 

Due to an accident involving a deer, I feel 
it is very important that the seatbelt law be 
enforced. Using the belt saved me from 
losing control of- my automobile. I was not 
physically injured, however, this was a 
traumatic experience with thoughts of what 
could have been the results. The accident 
occurred on a well-traveled Lake County 
highway about 3:30 in the afternoon. The 
Grayslake Police and the Lake County 
Sheriff were exceptionally kind and un- 
derstanding. * 

Betty Bradf ield 
Fox Lake 

Seeking Clean Town 

Editor: 

I attended a meeting of the CLEAR 
organization-Citizens of Lake County for 
Environmental Action Reform-and was 
really excited to see people acting on an issue 
that ts in Grayslake's backyard, the ARF 
landfill expansion and plans for the future. I 
really would like to see support for Liber- 
tyville Township with signatures, con- 
tributions, letter writing, phone calls and 
also their personal appearance on Jan. 19. 
I'm a concerned resident who complained 
about ARF and am willing to help for a clean 
town for the future. 

Charlotte A. Wilson 
Grayslake 



Ban Leg Trap 

Editor: 

In 1987, a very important bill will be 
presented to the Illinois General Assembly. 
This bill is to ban the leg-hold trap in the 
State of Illinois. 

The trap, itself, is a remnant of a barbaric 
method of capturing animals. Two steel jaws 
snap shut on any part of the anatomy that 
releases the holding spring. As a 
veterinarian, I have seen the mangled 
animals which have had the misfortune to 
roam where those traps had been set. 
Usually it is the toes or legs which have to be 
amputated.. .that is if the animal is still alive 
after being captured by this trap and left for 
days before discovery. However, it may be a 
laceration of the face, or even a missing 
tongue which has fallen victim to this 
crushing trap. 

Although intended for fur-bearing animals, 



these traps take their toll on a multitude of 
"non-target" animals such as eagles, hawks, 
deer and, of course, family pets. 

These traps are set indiscriminately by 
"hunters" trying to get their game. Frequen : 
try they are by streams, in fields, but also 
placed in park areas. Recently one was found 
in a recreation area where small children 
roam and play. Can you imagine the con- 
sequences if small fingers decided to explore 
this unusual shaped piece of metal. ..or if a 
foot happened to trigger the release of those 
penetrating jaws. . 

Around the world, 63 countries have ban- 
ned the use of the leg-hold trap. Individual 
states in the U.S. are now voting on the ban of 
this relic of past ages. Now is the time for 
Illinois to vote, and each person should let 
his congressman know of his feelings. 

The Elsa Wild Animal Appeal, P.O. Box 
675, Elmhurst, IL 60126, is active in 
spearheading the drive to let the Governor 
and Congressmen know of the sentiments of 
the people of the State of Illinois. Write this 
organization for information and support. It 
is a non-profit organization, so send along a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope if you ask 
them for information, and perhaps send 
them a donation so that they can continue to 
publicize this cruelty to our local wildlife and 
family pets. 

Take a moment for the benefit of 
wildlife.. .it only takes a few minutes to place 
a phone call to your local representative.. .his 
or her name will be in the phone book. Let 
your opinion be known! Write a letter if you. 
have time, but don't just sit idley by and do 
nothing. Call the county building or this 
newspaper to find the name and addresses of 
congresspersons to contact. Don't just sit 
and do nothing.. .do SOMETHING for the 
benefit of man and his animals. 

LewSeidenbergD.V.M 
Grayslake 



Letters Invited 

Letters to the editor are 
welcome. They should be on 
topics of general Interest, ap- 
proximately 250 words or (ess.. All 
letters must be signed, and con-, 
tain home address and 
.telephone number, The editor 
reserves the right to condense all 
letters. 



2B Lakeland Newspapon 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 



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County Museum Ready To Amaze 




■ — ■- 



Katherine Haml I ton •Smith, curator of special collec- 
tions at the Lake County Museum, stands in front of 
the Curt Teich postcard collection. The postcard's new 
exhibit area should be ready for viewing by May 
— Photo by Mark Benno. 



What's 

Happening • . • 




La Leche Announces Meeting 

La Leche League of the Round Lake Area will hold its mon- 
thly meeting at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. .21. The topic 
will be "Advantages of Breastfeeding." All expectant 
mothers, nursing mothers and interested women are invited 
to attend. Babies are always welcome. For more information 
and location of the meeting, call (312)546-5261 or (312)546- 
9034. 

'Snowball' Square Dance 

The Lake Zurich Alpiners Square Dance Club will hold a 
"Snowball Shuffle" dance from 8 to 11 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 
17, at St. Matthews Gym, Old McHenry Rd., Lake Zurich. 
Rounds will start at 8 p.m., and club caller Lyle Stalker will 
cue the squares starting at 8:30 p.m. Refreshments will be 
served. For further information call (815)385-3156 or 
(312)438-5087. 

Announce Deadline Change 

The Illinois Arts Council has announced that the FY '87 
Literary Awards deadline has been moved up to April 1, 1987, 
from April 15. Applications must be postmarked by midnight 
or hand-delivered by 5 p.m. on April 1. For further in- 
formation, contact the Performing and Communication Arts 
Programs Director at the Illinios Arts Council, State of 
Illinois Center, 100 VV. Randolph, Suite 10-500, Chicago, 60601, 
or call (312)917-6750. 



Free Blood Pressure Screening 

Victory Memorial Hospital will offer blood pressure 
screenings, free of charge, on Monday, Jan. 19 at two 
locations. Volunteers will be on hand from 8 a.m. to noon at 
the Victory Health Outreach Center, Lake Villa; and from 1 
to 3 p.m. in the lobby of Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. 
Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. No appointment is necessary. 



TelecommunicatorsToMeet 

The Northeast Illinois Telecommunications Assn. will hold 
its next meeting at noon on Wednesday, Jan. 27, at B.L. Plen- 
ty's Restaurant, Rtes. 120 and 83, Grayslake. All interested 
police and fire telecommunications personnel are urged to 
attend this business meeting. Buffet luncheon will be served. 
Cost is $6.25. Contact Terry Mitterling at the Grayslake 
Police Dept., (312)223-2341, with the approximate number of 
persons attending per department. 

Genealogical Meeting 

The Lake County Genealogical Society will meet at 10 a.m. 
on Thursday, Jan, "22 at Cook Memorial Library, 413 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Liberty ville. Everyone i is ; welcome^ For fur- 
t her information contact Joan Meyer at,( 312)223-4937. 

Thursday, January 15,1 9S7 



many years, some surprises 
are definitely in store. 

Jan Smith, curator of 
collections and site 
manager, led me on a guided 
tour through the attractive 
and visually stimulating 
exhibits. Smith spends much 
of her time assisting visitors 
with questions that require 
research in the museum's 
extensive library. 

The library, like 
everything in the museum, is 
directly connected to Lake 
County and its rich history. 
Museum buffs from ail over, 
however, will note that it 
manages to exude the at- 
mosphere of a large 
metropolitan museum 
despite its more limited sub- 
ject matter. 

One of the first rooms most 
visitors see is the orientation 
room. It is a cleverly 
designed room which 
focuses on maps and their 
relation to the changes in 
Lake County which occur 
over time. 

The maps begin with a pic- 
ture, of the earth, with Lake 
County marked by a tiny red 
dot. The views zoom in 
closer and closer to finally 
reveal each individual house 
in a satellite picture taken in 
theSO's. 

The designer of this room, 
and most other rooms in the 
museum, is Hans Gill. Gill 
has both bachelor and 
masters' degree training in 
art and sculpture, which is 
clearly evident in the careful 
attention to detail that shines 
through In his work. 

Gill alio designed, along 
with Smith, another one of 
the most interesting rooms 
In the museum. The 
discovery room is a place 
where people can actually 
touch and handle museum 
objects, without the threat of 
being removed from the 
premises. 

'It's a fun place, with a' 




Space Place 



Hans Gill, curator of exhibils and graphic arts at the Lake County Museum in 
Wauconda, stands beside one of his creations at the museum. Trie Discovery 
Room, where this painting is located, is often used to orient visitors to both Lake 
County and the museum itself — Photo by Mark Benno. 



"What's the use of 
educational experience 



an 
if 



you don't remember it?" ad- 
ded Gill. Since children com- 
pose the majority of the 
museum's visitors, the 
discovery room is a fitting 
addition to its already fine 
repertoire of displays. 

Smith said the exhibits are 
arranged in chronological 
order, which is why most 
visitors will probably see the 
mastadon bone found near 
Grass Lake before the post 
card collection from the 
1930's. * 

Being able to move ahead 
thousands of years in just a 
few steps makes, "a real 
nice juxtaposition of 



collage of a lot of different lifestyles," said Smith. The 

renovation going on right 
now will only accentuate this 
dramatic comparison from 



materials," said Smith. 
Goldberg agreed, saying, 
"there's a lot of hands on 
things. You remember more 
about your visit." 



CLC Offers 
Programs 
For Family 

The College of Lake Coun- 
ty is often overlooked as a 
source of family en- 
tertainment, yet it has 
programs running 

throughout the year. The 
following programs will be 
presented in the next month. 
Admission to all is free. 

Thursday, Jan. 15: Radio 
journalist Lou Palmer will 
speak on the status of Black 
Americans at the Lakeshore 
Educational Center at 7 p.m . 

Friday, Jan. 16 through 
Sunday, Feb. 8: The CLC 
• Gallery at the Grayslake 
campus will' present the 
works of Henry Simon, 
W.P.A. artist. At the opening 
reception on Friday, Jan. 16, 
Simon's grandson, Fred, 
who is a classical-jazz 
pianist, will perform at 7 
p.m. 

Thursday, Jan. 29: Top 
comedians from around the 
country will perform in the 
main lobby at noon. The 
show is sponsored in 
cooperation with Roars 
Comedy Club. 



present to past. 

Goldberg said that by 
February the new Victorian 
storefront will be completed. 
The Victorian storefronts 
will actually house displays 
and exhibits from that time 
period. Existing exhibits will 
either be moved or in- 
corporated into the new 
storefront theme. 

The storefronts will take 
up about one good corner of 



the museum. Goldberg said 
the museum then plans to 
move their, present postcard 
exhibit next to the Victorian 
setting. This exhibit, though, 
won't be ready for public 
viewing until May. 

For the past five years, the 
Lake County museum has 
been cataloging, resear- 
ching, and informing the 
public about its Curt Teich 
postcard collection. It is a 
vast collection of Lake Coun- 
ty postcards which date 
from the 1890's to the 1960's. 
The Regensteiner Corp. 
furnished the postcards for 
the museum,. and the grant 
to manage them came from 
the Curt Teich Foundation. 
The new postcard exhibit 
scheduled to premier in May 
will feature postcards from 
the 1930's, and how they 
illustrate the art-deco in- 
fluence of that time period. 
Katherine Hamilton-Smit- 



h, curator of special 
exhibits, is in charge of the 
Curt Teich display. 

Goldberg said that 
January is the perfect time 
for renovation, since it is a 
slow month for field trips to 
the museum. Aside from the 
postcard exhibit and Vic- 
torian storefronts, general 
clean-up and painting will 
also add to the museum's 
new look. 

The mystery and ad- 
venture of museums, and 
what might lurk around each 
corner, is their main appeal, 
said Goldberg. The Lake 
County Museum ac- 
complishes this and more, 
through the work of its staff 
and an even greater number 
of volunteers. Come 
springtime, the attic of Lake 
County will be ready once 
again to educate through en- 
tertainment. 



Mothers Of Twins Slate 'Talk' 

The Lake County Mothers of Twins invites all mothers of 
multiple births to their next meeting, at 7:30 p.m. on Thur- 
sday, Jan. 15, in Room 103 of St. Therese Hospital, 2615 
Washington St., Waukegan. The topic for this month is "Girl 
Talk: To Answer Our Twin Questions." For more in- 
formation, call (312)223-7020. 



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Lakeland Newspapers 3D 







.1 



: : 



Family 

Rock Cut tar nival Has Winter Fun For All 



After a hard week's worth 
of work, many families 
enjoy being able to pack up 
the kids and take a day trip - 
that is, a trip that is long 
enough to be out of the area, 
but no so far as to require an 
overnight stay. 

Kor most, day trips are a 
matter of impulse. Problem 
is. when the impulse strikes, 
information on where to go is 
often hard to find. Lakeland 
Newspapers will, when it is 
available, publish news in 
the family section of events 
and places to go when the 
impulseto wander strikes. 

Since we have finally 
gotten some real snow, the 
annual Hock Cut Winter 
Carnival should be a 
bonanza of fun for parents 
and kids. Ice and snow 
sculpting contests, dog sled 
races, cross country ski 
races and an ice skating 
clinic taught by professional 
skaters are some of the 
activities planned for the 
carnival at Rock Cut State 
Park, just northeast of 
Kockford on Jan. 17 and 18. 
Best of all, there is no en- 
trance charge for any of the 
activities and parking is 
free. 

Activities are planned 
from noon to 4 p.m. both 
days. If all the snow should 
melt before the weekend, 
alternate dales are j^an. 31 
and Feb. 1. 

Carnival activities are 
planned to show visitors that 
"state parks are not only to 
be used in summer." ac- 
cording to Jim Fulgenzi, 
conservation department 
special events coordinator. 
"A lot of our parks have ice 
fishing, cross country ski 
trails, snowmobile trails and 
sledding. The carnival af- 
fords visitors an opportunity 
to see what's availa ble in our 
slate parks in winter." 

The 13.4-kilometer Nordic 
Cross Country Ski Race is 
new to the carnival this year. 
It is sponsored by the 
Rockford Nordic Ski Club. 
Scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. 
Saturday, Jan. 17, the race is 
open to anyone 18 or older. A 
small entry fee is required 
for participants to cover 
insurance costs. For more 
information, call Mike 
Armovich of the Nordic Ski 
Club at (815) 229-0964 or 
1815)965-1832. 

Dog sled races and pulling 
contests, sponsored by 
Midwest Sled Dogs, Inc., 
officially open the event both 
days at noon and continue all 
day. As many as 40 sled dog 
teams from Wisconsin, 
Illinois. Michigan, Indiana 
and Iowa will compete in the 
contests. Three-dog, six-dog 
and eight-dog teams will 
race and pull in both junior 
and adult divisions. 

At 1 p.m. on Rock Cut's 
162-acre Pierce Lake, area 
rescue squads and diving 
teams will demonstrate 
scuba diving through the ice 
and techniques for rescuing 
people who've fallen 
through. 
A portion of Pierce Lake 
- will be available for 
broomball playing at i:3( 
p.m. and volunteers from th< 
Rockford Park Dist. wil 
provide novice players will 
lips on the sport. Broomball 
a sort of hockey-socce * 
hybrid, is played with ai 
inflated ball and old brooms , 
with players wearing old 
sneakers instead of ice 
skates. 



From 1:30 to 4 p.m.. 
volunteers will teach the 
finer points of cross country 
skiing to interested persons 
and lead them on a tour of 
Rock Cut's cross country ski 
trai . Though ski rentals arc 
available at the park, over 
40.0 X) people are expected to 
attend so Fulgenzi recom- 
mends that skiers bring their 
own equipment. 

Portions of Pierce Lake 
will be open for ice skating 
all day both days of the 
event. From 2 to3:30 p.m. on 
Sunday. Nan Lee Peterson 
and Charlene Guarano. 
professional skaters for 
winter carnivals and the Ice 
Capades, and Olympic 
skater Gordie McKellen will 
conduct an ice skating clinic. 
Participants must bring 
thi.'ir own skates. 

An "Anything But A Sled" 
contest is scheduled for 2:30 
p.m: on both days. Con- 
testants will go down hills in 
boxes, bathtubs, just about 
anything.. .but a sled. Prizes 
will be awarded for the 
smallest, largest, most 
unique and the entry that 
goes the farthest. 

Forty 400-pound blocks of 
ice have been ordered for the 
ice-sculpturing contests, 
which will be judged at 3:30 
b)th days. Dept. of Con- 
st ;rvation workers will push 
s low into large piles Tor the 
s now sculpturing contest. 
There is no entry fee, but 
contestants must bring their 
cwn tools. 

Free sleigh rides will be 
iffered to transport visitors 
tround the park. 

"We try to keep scheduled 
events to a minimum," 
fulgenzi said. "Most of our 
nctivities are continuous so 
visitors can roam through 
he park at their own pace 
ind see all the carnival has 
Lo offer." 

The lake will be available 
for ice fishing both days. 
Species available in Pierce 
Lake include largemoulh 
bass, bluegill and northern 
pike. 

The Dept. of Conservation 
will run a machine that 
makes building blocks out of 
snow so that people can 
make igloos on the lake. A 
bon fire will conclude the 
scheduled events on both 
days. • 

Fulgenzi advises people lo 
dress in layers - thermal 
underwear with woolen 
pants, a woolen shirt, a 
thermal vest or sweater and 
covered with a wind- 
resistant coat. Hats and 
warm boots and socks are 

Marriage 
Licenses 

Jack Brooking and Undo Whii thorn. Foe 
lout, 

Ranald Ouch. Fori Shtridon and Debrc 
Krmo, PorkCily. 

Email Hoynn and Cynthia Boihom, 
Round LoUtBtoch. 

Roben Malhewt, AHon, Po. and Carolyn 
Gardner, Mund«l*ln, 

D«nnl» Rorr.bloke and Bsrnodint 
Fiikorowiki.Lako Villa. 

Oonul W«y«rho*ui*r. Vernon Hilli and 
Liio Siolbtrtj. Gurrtae, 

Barry Gilly, Spring Grove and Margoioi 
Btnai. Antioch. 

JomQi Bond, Fok Lake and leonor 
Salinat. WHdwood, 

Raymond Lautr and Thereto Frawley. 
Anlioth, 

Dougloi Johnton adn Manoie Pel'ttk. 
Round Lake Helghli. 

Deep Well 

The deepest oil well in the 
world is located 150 miles 
north of the Arctic Circle in 
the U.S.S.R. In 1985 it was 7.2 
miles deep and is to be dug 
even deeper. 




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Dashing Through The Snow... 

Horse-drawn sleighs will provide rides for visitors at 
the annual "Winter Carnival" of Rock Cut State Park 
on Jan. 17 and 18. Other attractions include an ice and 
snow sculpture contest, ice fishing, skating, cross- 
country skiing, ice rescue, hot air balloons and sled 



dog races. Rock Cut State Park Is located just nor- 
theast of Rockford. There is no charge for any of the 
activities which will take place from noon to 4 p.m. 
both days. 



also recommended. 

Members of the Hock 
River Chapter of the 
American Red Cross will be 
on hand during the carnival 
lo deal with first-aid ser- 



vices. Hot food and 
beverages will be available 
at the park's concession 
area. The park is located a 
few miles 'northeast of 
Hockford along Hte. 173. 



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4B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1987 




! 



1987 



Family 

From Italy To America, Pizza Is A Favorite 



by CHARLES JOHNSTON 
Managing Editor. 

Do you know what week it 
is from Jan. 18 through 24? 
It's National Pizza Week. 
Some foods, like ham- 



burgers, hot dogs and pizza 
cut across socio-economic 
lines and are popular with all 
segments of the popula tion. 

Some people always buy 
their pizza from a favorite 




MBHC 




PASTAPIZZA 

2 cups uncooked corkscrew macaroni 

3 beaten eggs 
half cup milk 

half cup; shredded Cheddar cheese (2oz.) 
fourth cup finely chopped onion 
1 lb. lean ground beef 
1 15-oz. cantomatosauce 
.1 tsp. dried basil, crushed 
1 tsp, dried oregano, crushed 
half tsp. garlic salt 
1 medium tomato, thinly sliced 
I green pepper, sliced In rings 
land a half cups shredded mozzarella ehcese (€ oz. 



; Cook macaroni according to package directions; drain 
well. 

Combine eggs and milk; stir into cooked macaroni. Stir in 
cheddar cheese and onion; mix well. Spread macaroni 
mixture evenly over a well-buttered 14-inch pizza. pan. Bake 
ina 350 degree oven for25 minutes. 

Meanwhile, tn a large skillet cook ground beef till brown; 
drain off fat. Stir in tomato sauce, basil, oregano and garlic 
sail. Spoon meat mixture over baked macaroni crust. 
;Arrange tomato slices andpepper, rings over. Sprinkle , with 
mozzareila cheese* Bakejabout 15 minutes more or till cheese 
is bubbly. Makes eight servings, 



POPOVER PIZZA 

lib. lean ground beef 

1 large onion, chopped 

?1 1 S-oz. can torn a to s a ucc; 

half cup water 

I one arid five-eighths or. envelopc.spaghettl sauce mix 

one and a haUcup* shredded moizarella prprbvolone cheese 

i(6oz.) 

i cup milk 

ITbsp^cooldngoil 

1 cup all-purpose flour . 

half cup grated parmesan cheese 

Kifl % llfl llSIili 

\ In a large skillet cook the ground beef and onion till | the 
meat is brown and onion is tender. Drain off fat Stir in the 
tomato sauce, water arid spaghetti sauce mix.-Bring to Jjoil* 
Reduce heat; simmer; uricoveredfor 10 mmutes.^ : 

Meanwhile; in small niixer bowl combine eggs, rnllk and 
oil. Beat with electric mixer on medium speedstill well 
blended. Add flour ail atorice, beating tiU mixture is smooth: : 

Sr^n hot meal mixl^ 
dish." Sprinkle the tnozzarefla or, ^^provolone cheese ovep the 
Meat mixture. Pour flour mixture over cheese, spreading to. 
Completely cover filling. Sprinkle parmesan cheese over, 
batter. Bake in a 425-degree oven for 20 minutes or UD top is 
puffed and golden brown. Makes eight servings., 



pizzeria, others will settle 
for frozen pizza, and some 
daring souls are willing to 
make their own pizza 
specialties. Along with this 
article are two tried and true 
home pizza- recipes that 
anyone can make. 

One Lakeland area pizza- 
man who has had much 
success with this gooey dish 
is Wayne McManus.Twenty- 
two years ago he made his 
first pizza in a little shop in 
.Arlington Heights. People 
like his brand of pizza so well 
that he has never had to stop. 

Today, McManus owns the 
Antioch Pizza Shop, Wayne's 
Gurnee Pizza and The Pizza 
Place in Round Lake Park. 
Making the perfect pizza, he 
says, is the art of using all 
fresh natural ingredients 
and distributing them 
evenly. He must know, for 
though he will not say how 
many he sells a week, each 
of his pizzerias are among 
the most popular in their 
respective towns. 

Winter is a particularly 
good time for pizza, as 
people are indoors more 
watching - football, basket- 
ball or just visiting for an 
evening. Saturday nights 
remain the most popular 
night to hit the pizza parlor. 

In honor of National Pizza 
Week, we bring- you the 
following trivia and tidbits: 

-Wisconsin is the largest 
producer of Italian cheeses 
in the U.S., producing over 
484 million pounds annually. 
Nationally, Italian cheese 
production exceeds 1.3 
billion pounds. 

-Americans consume an 
average of 22.5 pounds of 
pizza a year. 

-Pepperoni is the favorite 
pizza topping because of its 
hot taste and sweet af- 
tertaste. Anchovies are the 
least favored. 

-Americans prefer thin 
crust (48 percent) to thick 
crust (45 percent) pizzas. 
The remaining seven per- 
cent say they like both 
equally. 

-Ninety to 95 percent of all 
food delivered is pizza. Fifty 
percent of all pizzerias 
business is through 
deliveries. 

-The nation's largest user 
of real mozzarella cheese is 
none other than Pizza Hut. 

-According to the Guinness 
Book of World Records, the 
largest pizza measured 
more than 80 ft. in diameter 
and weighed 18,664 lbs. 



Prepared in 1978 in Oma 
Pizza Restaurant, Glen 
Falls, New York, it was cut 
into 60,318 slices. 

-A pizza maker is called a 
pizzaiollo. 

-The original pizza, called 
Neopolitan, was created in 
Naples, Italy during the 16th 
century. It's unlikely that 
forks were used then, as they 
were not common in Italy 
until the 17th century. 



-One of America's fastest 
selling frozen foods is pizza. 
Frozen Food Age magazine 
reports that more than $1 
billion was spent on some 450 
million lbs. of frozen pizza in 
1984. Sales are expected to 
exceed $107 billion by 1993. 

-Grandparents consume 
an average of 3.8 frozen 
pizzas each annually. 

Though pizza got its start 
in Italy, it look America to 



make it a phenomenon. So 
make plans now to celebrate 
National Pizza Week, The 

proper celebration requires 
a sporting event or a night 
out with the gang and plenty 
of soda pop or beer to wash 

down the proper food which 
should be eaten in 
celebration. I'd tell you what 

the proper food is, but you 
already know that. 




Favorite Pizza Man 

One of the most popular pizza chefs In the Lakeland area, Wayne McManus, 
displays his culinary craftsmanship. McManus owns three local pizzerias; the An- 
tioch Pizza Shop, Wayne's Gurnee Pizza and The Pizza Place In Round Lake Park. 
He is getting set for a rush on these delightful concoctions of crust, sauce and 
cheese in honor of National Pizza Week. — Photo by Charles Johnston 

Mother Nature Calms 
Winter Cabin Fever 



Marriage 



Bailey-Hoffman 

Sharla Renee Bailey, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon Bailey of Wauconda, and Derek 
Matthew Hoffman, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Hoffman of Island Lake, were 
united in matrimony on Sept. 13 at Tran- 
sfiguration Church, Wauconda. Father 
Byron Maher officiated. 

The bride was given away by her father in 
the double-ring ceremony. 

Matron of honor was Diane Fry Petty, aunt 
of the bride. Bridesmaids were Karen Fry 
Payne, cousin of the bride; Debbie Hoffman, 
sister of the groom; Janis James, Ellen 
Ahem, and Annette Garcia. Flower girl was 
Millissa James. 

Best man was Darrell Hoffman, brother of 
the groom. Groomsmen were Damon Hoff- 
man, brother of the groom; Dean Ziebel, un- 
cle of the groom; Louie Sharp, Mike Mc- 
Carren and Chuck Lundgren, 

Ushers were Randy Bailey, brother of the 
bride; and John David Toliver, cousin of the 

Following a reception at Hob Nob II in 
Crystal Lake, the newlyweds took 
honeymoon cruise in the Carribean. 



Winter festivals are touted as sure cures 
for "cabin fever." One difference this year is 
the mild weather. It's sort of a "Who needs 
Florida" syndrome, coupled with "Skiing? 
What's that?" Cabin fever just does not 
materialize as rapidly in our surprisingly 
warm winter. But, Mother Nature is sure to 
have something for us in her bag of tricks. 

Lacking winter, maybe we should seek it. 
The coldest winter in my recollection was 
one spent in Bemidji, Minn., where I at- 
tended college. That particular winter had a 
30-day average of 20 below and was their 
second most severe on record. Even Paul 
Bunyan would have had trouble keeping 
The couple have made their home in Island warm that year. Bimidji continues to be a 



is appropriate to make plans" for upcoming 
vacations. Travel booths-385 of them-will 
offer information on recreational areas, 
resorts, hotels and lodges. Nearly as many 
additional displays of sporting equipment, 
boats and fishing supplies will capture 
visitor interest. The show will open week- 



Lake. 




frequent low temperature point in the U.S 

Now Bemidji's a place where cabin fever 
can be severe. They plan to overcome it in 
February with a week-long festival starting 
Friday, Feb. 27. One of the highlights is the 
March 3 northern version of "Fat Tuesday," 
a religious holiday celebrated annually in 
New Orleans. Last year, Bemidjians decided 
they were the sister city of New Orleans. 
Why? Because they are the northernmost 
city on the Mississippi River. With. New 
Orleans as southernmost, they now have 
"Sister City" status. One of Bemidji's 
downtown streets becomes Bourbon St. and 
cajun music, fiddle contests, parades and a 




days from. 1 to 10 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m. to 
9:30.p.i«i; affd Sundays from 10 a.m. to,5 p.m. 
Admission is $5.50; children six to 12 are$2. ' 
They say "You can't have your cake and 
eat it, too," but if you do, it might be some of 
the 93-layer chocolate cake created for the 
fifth • annual Great American Chocolate 
Festival in Hershey, Pa. It will be seen in the 



Masquerade Ball are highlights that extend lobby of Hotel Hershey, during the Feb. 13-16 



Mr. and Mrs. Derek Hoffman 



into the week. 

Information may be obtained by calling 
the Bemidji Chamber of Commerce, 
(218)751-3540, but there is yet another way. 
Contact Bemidji's booth at the Chicagoland 
Sport Fishing, Travel and Outdoor Show at 
O'Hare Expo Center, between Jan. 30 and 
Feb. 8, They are at 2109 Northern Pike St. in 
the show floorplan. 

This is truly a traveler's show and timing 



festivities. The magic number 93 is to 
commemorate the 93rd anniversary of 
Hershey's cocoa, known around the world.*'. 
Included in the weekend festival is a gay 90s 
party, Sweetheart Valentine's Day dance, 
chocolate fashion show, tours and winter 
activities indoor and out, and the beautiful, 
ever-present scent of chocolate. For details,, 
call (800)533-3131, or write for festival in- 
formation, Box BB, Hershey, Pa., 17033. 






;. 



■ 



Thursday.Januan/15,1987 



Lakeland Newspapers SB 






...... ■■ I ».1 







Obituaries 



Andrew Eder 

A Funeral Mass for An- 
drew J. Eder, 84, of Gurnee, 
were held Friday, Jan. 9 at 
St. Anastasia Church in 
Waukegan. 

Mr. Eder died Tuesday, 
Jan. 6 at Victory Memorial 
Hospital in Waukegan. He 
was born March 23, 1902 in 
Collegeville, Minn. He had 
retired from Outboard 
Marine Corp. and was a 
former milkman in Antioch. 

Survivors include one 
daughter, Mary (Elmer) 
Knoll of Barrington; four 
grandchildren; seven great- 
grandchildren; one brother, 
Robert Eder of Michigan; 
one sister, Rose Barg of 
Minnesota. Mr. Eder was 
preceded in death by his 
wife, Ella, in 1970. 

Interment was at 
Ascension Cemetery. 

John Brevik 

Funeral services for John 
N. Brevik, 73, of Round Lake 
Beach, were held Friday, 
Jan. 9 at the MacGillis 
Guneral Home in Round 
Lake. 

Mr. Brevik died Wed- 
nesday, Jan." 7 at the St. 
Therese Medical Center in 
Waukegan following a long 
illness. He was born Sept. 10, 
1913 in Hustad, Norway, 
immigrated to the U.S. in 
1930, and had been a resident 
of Round Lake Beach for the 
past 30 years. He was em- 
ployed as a carpenter. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Abel (nee Field); two 
daughters, Karen Martin of 
Round Lake Beach and 
Margaret Limueller of Fox 
Lake; two sons, Richard 
(Lois) Bay of Ingleside and 
Robert (Bonnie) Bay of 
Michigan; 16 grandchildren; 
three great-grandchildren; 
four brothers, Anders of 
Norridge; Henry of Harwood 
Heights; Elmer (Helen) of 
Addison, and Harold (Lilly) 
of Norway; two sisters, , 
Anna Strand of Norridge and 
Karoline (Alfred) 

Tidesmasen of Norway. 
Entombment was at 

Windridge Cemetery in 

Gary. 

Clifford Frazier 

Funeral services for 
Clifford L. Frazier, 86, of 
Grayslake, were held 
Monday, Jan. 12 at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel in 
Grayslake. 

Mr. Frazier died Thur- 
sday, Jan. 8 at Condell 
Memorial Hospital in 
Libertyville. He was born 
Sept. 29, 1900 in Grayslake, 
and remained a life-long' 
resident. He was a charter 
member of the United 
Protestant Church, 
Grayslake; an active 
member of the Grayslake 
Historical Society; an active 
member of the Grayslake 
Fire Dept. for many years. 
He was a retired electrician. 

Survivors include two 
daughters, Lila M. Lynn and 
Betty J. Anderson, both of 
Grayslake; four grandsons; 
and . three great- 
granddaughters. He was 
preceded in death by his 
wife, Flossie, in 1980. 

Interment was at Highland 
Memorial Park, Liber- 
tyville. 

Frank Oplawski 

A Mass of the Resurrec- 
tion for Frank Oplawski, 81, 
of Lindenhurst, was 
celebrated Monday, Jan. 12 
at St. Mary's Church in 
Buffalo Grove. 

Mr. Oplawski died 



Thursday, Jan. 8 at Condell 
Hospital in Libertyville He 
was born Nov. 30, 1905 in 
Chicago, moving to Lin- 
denhurst Sin 1982. Mr. 
Oplawski was a retired tally 
man for a lumber company. 
He was a member of St. 
Francis of Assisi Church in 
Chicago. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Rose (nee Zientara); three 
sons, Frank (Jean), Charles 
(Marlene) and Louis 
(Marge); 10 grandchildren; 
eight great-grandchildren; 
two sisters, Victoria 
(William) Adamson and 
Virginia (John) Moran. 

Interment was at Maryhill 
Cemetery in Niles. 

Leona Stadwiser 

A Funeral Mass for Leona 
M. Stadwiser (nee Cote), 82, 
an Ingleside resident for 
over 50 years, was held 
Monday, Jan. 12 at St. 
Bede's Catholic Church. 

Mrs. Stadwiser died 
Thursday, Jan. 8, at St. 
Therese Hospital in 
Waukegan. She was born 
Nov. 26, 1904 in Chicago. 

Survivors include two 
nieces, Joy Stockkamp of 
Michigan, and Dorothy 
(Steve) Pesch of Chicago, 
one nephew, Richard Ir- 
miler of Chicago; a 
daughter-in-law, Margaret 
(Paul) Stadwiser of 
Woodridge, Wis.; a brother- 
in-law, Peter Irmiter of 
Chicago; three great-neices, 
two great-nephews and other 
relatives. She was preceded 
in death by her husband, 
August Stadwiser in 1964. 

Burial was at St. Joseph's 
Cemetery. 

Mar jorie Ferguson 

A memorial service for 
Marjorie Ferguson (nee 
Moir), of Falls Church, Va., 
formerly of Grayslake, was 
held in Falls Church on 
Monday, Jan. 5. 

Mrs. Ferguson died 
Thursday, Jan. l of cancer. 
She was born May 1, 1939 and 
grew up in Grayslake, 
graduating form Grayslake 
Community High School She 
received her nursing degree 
in Virginia and had worked 
as a registered nurse at 
George Washington 
University Hospital for the 
past seven years. 

Survivors include her 
husband, John; three 
children, Army Sgt. Donald 
Harvey, Aaron and Deanne 
Ferguson; two grand- 
children; and two sisters, 
Sue Babuta and Betsy Moir. 
Expressions of sympathy 
may be made to the Cancer 
Society or Hospice of Nor- 
thern Virginia, 4715 N. 15th 
St., Arlington, Va. 22205. 

Chester Gienko 

A Mass of the Resurrec- 
tion for Chester Gienko, 67, 
of Mundelein, was held 
Thursday, Jan. 8 at Santa 
Maria del Popolo Church. 

Mr.' 'Gienko died Sunday, 
Jan. 4 at the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Medical Center 
in North Chicago. He was 
born Nov. 4, 1919 in Chicago, 
and had been a Mundelein 
resident for many years. Mr. 
Gienko was a veteran of 
World War II, a member of 
the Mundelein American 
Legion Post 867, the Mun- 
delein VFW Post 7191, and 
past commander and 
member of the Mundelein 
Amvets Post 236. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Marie; two sons, Robert 
(Sandra) of South 



Barrington, and James 
(Mary), of Roselle; one 
grandson; three brothers, 
Father Marion C.R. of 
Chicago, Richard (Rene) of 
Oak Brook, and Mitchell 
(Josephine) of Norridge. 

Interment was at Memory 
Gardens in Arlington 
Heights. 



Robert Girten 

Funeral services for 
Robert E. Girten, 66, of 
Crooked Lake, Lake Villa, 
were held Thursday, Jan. 8 
at the Strang Funeral Home 
in Antioch. 

Mr. Girten died suddenly 
Tuesday, Jan. 6, after being 
hit by an automobile on Deep 
Lake Rd. in Lake Villa. He 
was born Aug. 18, 1920 in 
Faribault, Minn., and had 
lived in Lake Villa since 
1957. Mr. Girten was a 
member of St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church in Lin- 
denhurst. He had taught for 
22 years at Lance Junior 
High School in Kenosha, 
retiring in 1985. 

Survivors include his wife 
Marjorie; three daughters, 
Adele Girten of Texas; 
Karen (Mike) Perrone of 
Antioch; and Susan Girten of 
Texas; one brother, John of 
Chicago; and two grandsons. 

Interment was at Hillside 
Cemetery in Antioch. 



Carl Madsen 

Funeral services for Carl 
A. Madsen, 87, formerly of 
Wildwood, were held Friday, 
Jan. 9 at the Strang Funeral 
Chape) in Grayslake. 

Mr. Madsen died Tuesday, 
Jan. 6 in Big Springs, Texas, 
following a lingering illness. 
He was born March 30, 1898, 
in Copenhagen, Denmark, 
came to the U.S. and had 
made his home in Wildwood 
over 35 years. He was a 
member of Shepherd of the 
La k os hu the ran Church in 
Grayslake, and a member of 
Rising Sun Lodge No. 115 AF 
and AM, Grayslake. He had 
been an accountant. 

Survivors include two 
sons, Carl A. (Helen) Jr. of 
Chicago, and Gene (Bar- 
bara) of Texas. Mr. Madsen 
was preceded in death by his 
wife, Elizabeth. 

Entombment was at 
Highland Memorial Park 
Mausoleum in Libertyville. 



Julia Johnson 

Funeral services for Julia 
"Rose" Johnson, 79, of 
Round Lake Park, were held 
Monday, Jan. 12 at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel in 
Grayslake, 

Mrs. Johnson died Friday, 
Jan. 9 at Condell Memorial 
Hospital in Libertyville. She 
was born Sept. 17, 1907 in 
Slonefort (now McCormick), 
111., and had been a Lake 
County resident since 1947. 
She was a member of the 
Clearview Baptist Church in 
Round Lake. 

Survivors include one son, 
Billy Rose of Florida; three 
daughters, Helen (Stan) 
Binning of Gurnee; Betty 
(Arthur) Creaney.of Bristol, 
Wis.; and Phyllis Smith of 
Wadsworth; 14 grand- 
children and 14 great- 
grandchildren; one sister, 
Hilda (Hobart) McSparin of 
Carrier Mills, 111.; one 
brother, Alton (Roberta) 
Baker of Eddy ville,. 111.; and 
other relatives. 

Burial was dt Zion 
Cemetery in Ozark, 111. 



Helmer Carl berg 

Funeral services for 
Helmer S. Carlberg, 84, of 
Round Lake Beach, were 
held Monday, Jan. 12 at the 
MacGillis Funeral Home in 
Round Lake. 

Mr. Carlberg died 
Thursday, Jan. 8 at St. 
Therese Medical Center in 
Waukegan. He was born 
April 25, 1902 in Manistee, 
Mich, and had been a 
resident of Round Lake 
Beach for the past 12 years. 

Survivors include two 
sisters, Adelia Harrigan and 
Edla Greene, both of 
Florida; two nieces, Carole 
(James) Bliss of Claredon 
Hills and Dorothy (James) 
Hust of Minnesota; and two 
nephews, Leroy (Nancy) 
Andren of Palatine, and 
Donald Harrigan of Texas. 

Interment was at 
Woodlawn Cemetery in 
Forest Park. 

Ruth Greenwald 

Funeral services for Ruth 
L. Greenwald (nee Holt- 
dorf), 70, of Salem, were 
held Monday, Jan. 12 at 
Peace Evangelical Lutheran 
Church in Wilmol. 

Mrs. Greenwald died 
Thursday, Jan. 8 at Indian 
Head Medical Center in Shell 
Lake, Wis. of an apparent 
heart attack. She was born 
May 27, 1916 in Wilmot. She 
had lived most of her life in 
the Salem area. She had 
worked at the Active 
Specialty Co. in Antioch for 
many years. 

Survivors include two 
sons, Walter (Charlcne) 
Procknow of Salem, and 
Richard (Diane) Greenwald 
of Shell Lake; three 
daughters, Gail (Jim) 
Talbert of Shell Lake, Ruth 
Zinsky of Tennessee, and 
Mary (Bud) Dillon of 
California; one brother, 
Lloyd (Frieda) Holtdorf of 
Trevor; 10 grandchildren 
and eight great- 
grandchildren. 

Interment was at Wilmot 
Cemetery. 

Manuela Carrion 

Funeral services for 
Manuela Carrion, 59, of 
Wadsworth, were held 
Monday, Jan. 12 at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel in 
Grayslake. 

Mrs. Carrion died Thur- 
sday, Jan. 8 at St. Therese 
Medical Center in Waukegan 
following a long illness. She 
was born Dec. 31, 1927 in 
Pasdos Blanca, Argentina. 
Mrs. Carrion was a member 
of Hawthorn Community 
Church in Vernon Hills. She 
had been a nurses aid by 
profession, 

Survivors include her 
husband, Hector; two 
daughters, Iris (Doug) 
Beatty of Texas, and Edda 
(Al) Palucci of Wadsworth; 
her mother, Carmen Gar- 
mendia; two sisters, Viccnta 
Stella and Ubalada Mures; 
one brother, Antonio Gar- 
mendia, all of Argentina; 
and two grandchildren, 

Interment was at St. 
Mary's Cemetery, Fremont 
Center. 

Peter Decho 

A Mass of the Resurrec- 
tion for Peter T. Decho, 88, of 
Wildwood, was celebrated 
Saturday, Jan. 10 at St. 
Gilbert • Church in 
Grayslake. 

Mr. Decho died Wed- 
nesday, . Jan. 7 at Condell 
Memorial-Hospital in Liber- 
tyville, after a six-month 



illness. He was born July 12, 
1900 in Chicago and lived in 
Wildwood the past 20 years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Decho had 
celebrated their 65th wed- 
ding anniversary. For 37 
years, he was junior partner 
of an architectural and 
woodworking ' firm In 
Chicago. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Edna (nee Storm) ; two sons, 
Russell (Darcie) of West- 
chester and James 
(Jacquelyn) of Claredon 
Heights; one daughter, Bar- 
bara (Gilbert) Mitchell of 
Florida;. one sister, Daisy 
Niermann of Melrose Park; 
12 grandchildren and nine 
great-grandchildren. 

Interment was at Queen of 
Heaven Cemetery in 
Hillside. 

Delores Pederson 

Funeral services for 
Delores I. Pederson, 56, of 
Antioch, were held Satur- 
day, Jan. 10 at the United 
Methodist Church in Wilmot. 

Mrs, Pederson died Thur- 
sday, Jan. 8 at St. Therese 
Medical Center in 
Waukegan. She was born 
June 13, 1930, in Chicago, 
and had lived in Antioch sin- 
ce 1962. She had been em- 
ployed as a secretary for the 
Taylor Furniture Mart in 
Waukegan for 15 years. 

Survivors include her 
husband, Richard; one son, 
John (Karen), and one 
daughter, Deborah, both of 
Antioch; her mother, Louise 
Rollins of' Antioch; one 
brother, Thomas (Janet) 
Rollins of Maryland; one 
sister, Betty (Stewart) 
Drummond of California; 
and three grandchildren. 

Interment was at Hillside 
Cemetery in Antioch. 

Henrietta Anderson 

Memorial services for 
Henrietta A. "Andy" An- 
derson, 67, of Gurnee, were 
held Wednesday, Jan. 14 
from Trinity Lutheran Chur- 
ch. 

Miss Anderson died Wed- 
nesday, Jan. 7 at Winchester 
House. She was born May 3, 
1919 in Minot, N.D. She was a 
member of the Lutheran 
Deaconess of Nebraska from 
1955 to 1962 where she had 
been a Sister. Miss Anderson 
had been an executive direc- 
tor of the Girl Scout Council 
in Minnesota, and executive 
director of the Lakeview Girl 
Scout Council from 1977 to 
1981. 

Survivors include her 
mother, Edna Holbrook of 
Libertyville; one sister, 
Dorothy Nidell of Wheeling. 
She was preceded in death 
by a sister, Nancy Loedkie 
and her father, Charles F. 
Anderson. 



James Barnett 

A Funeral Mass for James 
LeRoy Barnett, of Gurnee, 
was celebrated Tuesday, 
Jan. 13 at St. Joseph Church 
in Waukegan. 

Mr. Barnett died Satur- 
day, Jan. 10. He was born in 
1918 in Oklahoma City, 
Okla. , and was a resident of 
Lake County most of his life. 
Before his retirements, Mr. 
Barnett worked for Benson 
Electric, Inc. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Phyllis (nee Salisbury; two 
sons, Charles and William 
(Celeste); four daughters, 
Catherine Repp, Barbara 
(James Gengler, Elizabeth 
Barnett, and Joanne (Keith) 
Rutkowski; 10 grand- 
children and one great- 
grandchild. 

Interment was at Lakeside 
Cemetery in Libertyville. 

Anna Mary EHason 

Memorial services for An- 
na Mary EHason, 80, of 
Sebring, Fla. were held Wed- 
nesday, Jan. 7 ' at the 
Stephenson-Nelson Chapel in 
Sebring. 

Mrs. Eliason died Sunday, 
Jan. 4. She was born in 
Buchanan, Va. Before 
moving to Sebring 14 years 
ago, she lived in Gages Lake. 

Survivors include her 
husband, Carl; one son, Don 
Seay of Lake Placid; two 
sisters, Beulah Wood of Ohio 
and Blanch Wood of Sebring; 
three grandchildren and four 
great-grandchildren. 

Arrangements were han- 
dled by the Stephenson- 
Nelson Funeral Home, P.O. 
Box 193, Sebring, FLA 33870. 

Henry Gefvert 

Memorial services for 
Henry H. Gefvert, 88, of 
Wilmette, were held Satur- 
day, Jan. 3 at the Strang 
Funeral Chapel in 
Grayslake. 

Mr. Gervert died Thur- 
sday, Jan. 1, at Condell 
Memorial Hospital in Liber- 
tyville following a long 
illness. He was bom March 
30, 1898 in Dalarna, Sweden; 
immigrated to Boston, 
Mass; and resided in 
Chicago and Wilmette since 
1931, when he formed 
Manufacturing Enterprises 
(Crescent Industries). In 
1955 he merged with War- 
wick Inc. and formed Gefco 
Mfg. Corp. in Grayslake. He 
was widely recognized as an 
inventor for contribution in 
sound reproduction 
. technology. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Ellen; two sons, Herbert 
(Virginia) of Lake Forest, 
and Harold (Carrol) Gefvert 
of Florida; 10 grandchildren 
and seven great- 
grandchildren.. 

Interment was private. 




Phone:(312)223-9240 
EVERLASTING MEMORIALS 

Formerly BUEHLER MEMORIALS of Round Lake 
33107 N.Hwy. 45 • WILDWOOD, ILLINOIS 60030 



Finest Design 
Finest Materials 
Finest Craftsmanship 
No Work Too Large Or 
Too Smoll 



EXPERIENCE 
DIGNITY 
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Inspection Invited 



SERVING ALL FAITHS AND CEMETARY 

k» monuments 
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i^ bronze plaques 
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repairs and cleaning 

REASONABLE PRICES — All year long 



6B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 15, 1967 






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WEEKDAYS 



5:00 A.M. 
Q - Bill Cosby Show 
O - CNN News 
O O - Varied Programs 
(D - AgDay 
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[ESPN] - Getting Fit with Denise Aus- 
tin 

5:30 A.M. 
CD - Morning Stretch 
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O - CBS Morning News 
O - 20 Minute Workout 
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CD - Tom & Jerry and Friends 
m - Kidsworfd 
|ESPN] - Nation's Business Today 

6:00 A.M. 
O CD - Today's Business 
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O - ABC News This Morning (CC). 
O - Muppets 
ID CD - Farm Day 
CD © - Defenders of the Earth 
63 - Informacion 26 
03 - Shape Up 

6:15 A.M. 
CD - A.M , Weather 
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fsD - Hooked on Aerobics 

6:30 A.M. 
- CBS Morning News 
O - NBC News at Sunrise 
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CD - Nightly Business Report 
CD 03 - Varied Programs . 
CD - ABC News This Morning 
CD - M.A.S.K. 
03 - El Ctub 700 
€D-GoBot5 
[ESPN] - Nation's Business Today 

6:45 A.M. 
@0 - Hatha Yoga 

7:00 A.M. 
O - CBS Morning News 
O - Today In Stereo. 
O CD - Good Morning America 
(CC). 

- Bozo Show 
CD - Sesame Street (CC). 
CD - 3-2-1, Contact (CC). 
CD - Transformer* 
S3 - Jimmy Swaggart 
CD - Woody Woodpecker 

7:05 A.M. 
CD - I Dream of Jeannie 

7:15 A.M. 
60 - Varied Programs 

7:25 A.M. 
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7:30 A.M. 
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gers 

03 - Richard Roberts Show 
ED - The Flintstones 
03 - James Robison 

7:35 A.M. 
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8:00 A.M. 
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CD - Captain Kangaroo 
CD - The Flintstones 
£9 - Tom & Jerry 
ED - Something Beautiful 

8:05 A.M. 
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8:15 A.M. 
© - A.M. Weather > 

8:25 A.M. 
CD - News 

8:30 A.M. 
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CD CD - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
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8:35 A.M. 
CD - I Love Lucy 

9:00 A-M. 
0-' $25,000 Pyramid 
O - Safe of the Century 



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O - Oprah Winfrey 

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CD - Hooked on Aerobics 

CD - Sesame Street (CC). 

CD - All My Children 

CD - 700 Club 

03 - Business Newsmakers 

€D - The Munsters 

€0 - Shape Up 

9:05 A.M. 
CD - Movie 

9:30 A.M. 
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63-1 Love Lucy 
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10:00 A.M. 
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03 - News 
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10:15 A.M. 
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10:30 A.M. 
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03 - Ask art Expert on Stocks: Muni- 
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ffl - Varied Programs 

11:00 A.M. 
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03 - News 

63 - San ford and Son 
03 63 - Varied Programs 

1 1:05 A.M. 
CD - Perry Mason 

11:15 A.M. 
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11:30 A.M. 
O - Young and the Restless 
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O - Laving ' 
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CD CD - Sesame Street (CC). 
CD - True Confessions 
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03 - Ask an Expert 
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63 - Movie 
63 - Jimmy Swaggart 
(ESPN) - Getting Fit with Denise Aus- 
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12:00 P.M. 
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CD - News 
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63 - Brady Bunch 
03 63 - Varied Programs 

12:05 P.M. 
CD - Movie ' 

12:20 P.M. 
03 - Ask an Expert 

12:30 P.M. 
- As the World Turns 
CD - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
CD - Wild, Witd World of Animals 
CD - Laverne & Shirley 
CD - Carol Burnett and Friends 
63 - Get Smart 
63 - CNN News 

1:00 P.M. 
O - Another World 
O CD - One Life to Live 
- Dick Van Dyke 
CD - World of Survival 
CD - Varied Programs 
CD - F-Troop 
03 - Ask an Expert 
63 - Happy Days 



63 - Instructional Programs 
63 - Campmeeting USA 

1:30 P.M. 
- Capitol 
- Andy Griffith 
CD - Hooked on Aerobics 
CD - Addams Family 
03 - Ask an Expert 
63 - Mork & Mindy 

1:35 P.M. 
CD - Varied Programs 

2:00 P.M. 
- Guiding Light 
O - Santa Barbara 
O CD - Genera) Hospital 
- Leave tt to Beaver 
CD 63- Varied Programs 
CD - Mister Ed 
63 - Fat Albert 

2:05 P.M. 
CD - Tom & Jerry and Friends 

2:30 P.M. 
- Bugs Bunny 
CD - GoBcts 
03 - Ask an Expert 
63 - Tom & Jerry 

3:00 P.M. 
- Divorce Court 
- Jeopardy 
- All New Dating Game 
- Love Connection 
O - True Confessions 
- Ghostbusters 
CD - Sesame Street (CC). 
CD - Hour Magazine 
CD CD - Varied Programs 
63 - The Flintstones 
63- 100 Huntley Street 

3:05 P.M. 
CD - Varied Programs . 
CD - Scooby Doo 

3:30 P.M. 
- Donahue 
O - Oprah Winfrey 
- Love Connection 
- Divorce Court 
O - Jeopardy 
CD - Smurfs 
CD - Size Small 
CD 63 - Varied Programs 
03-700 Club 
63 - She Ra Princess of Power 

3:35 P.M. 
CD - The Flintstones 

4:00 P.M. 
- People's Court 
- Superior Court 
O - News 
- G.I. Joe 

CD - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
CD -3-2-1, Contact (CC). 
CD - New Newlywed Game 
CD 03 - Varied Programs 
CD - The Jetsons 

63- He-Man & Masters of the Univ- 
erse 
63 - Hatha Yoga 

4:05 P.M. 
CD - Gilligan's Island 

4:30 P.M. 
- First Edition 
- People's Court 
O - News 
0- Benson 
- Transformers 
CD - Sesame Street (CC). 
CD - Wild, Wild World of Animals 
CD - All New Dating Game 
CD (ESPNI - Varied Programs . 
CD -G.I. Joe 
63 - Thundercats 
63 - Homework Hotline 

4:35 P.M. 
CD - Rocky Road In Stereo. 

5:00 P.M. 
O CD - News 
- Facts of Life 
CD - One by One 
CD 63 - Varied Programs 
CD - Three's Company 
03 - Novela: Tanalri 
63 - Diff'renl Strokes 
5:05 P.M. 
CD - Beverly Hillbillies 
5:30 P.M. 
- CBS News 
O - NBC News . 
O CD -ABC News 
- WKRP In Cincinnati 



) 
e 

XJO 




.blowers are not just 
for special occasions, 
they make the 
occasion special. 

Sincerely, 

Balmes Florist & Greenhouse 

FULL SERVICE FLOWER SHOP 



4949 Grand Avenue 
Suite 7B, Gurnee, IL 

(312) 2494644 



1720 Green Bay Rd. 
North Chicago, IL 

(312) 689-3322 



CD - 3-2-1. Contact (CC). 
CD - Varied Programs 
CD - Leave It to Beaver 
09 - Gimme a Break 

5:35 P.M. 
CD - Andy Griffith 

THURSDAY 
1/15/87 

12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: North 
Carolina at Virginia (R). 

12:05 P.M 
CD - MOVIE: 'Cross of Lorraine' 

12:30 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Come Back Little 
Sheba' 

1:00 P.M. 
tHBOj - MOVIE: 'Tender Mercies' 

2:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mark Sosin's Salt Water 
Journal 

2:30 P.M. 
CD - Sister Adrian, the Mother Ter- 
esa of Scranton 
[HBO] - Courage 
[ESPN] - Tom Mann Outdoors 

3:00 P.M. 
(HBO] - It's No Crush, I'm In Love 
|ESPN] - Rollermanla 

4:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Wildrose' 
[ESPN] - NFL Films 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Inside the PGA Tour 

4:40 P.M. 
03 - Today's Racing 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
O O CD - News 
- Barney Miller 
CD CD - MacNell-Lehrer Newshour 
CD - Gimme a Break 
6Q - Informacion 26 
€B - Three's Company 
€0 - MOVIE: 'Smash-Up' 
63 - Zola Levitt 
(HBO) - Talk Show 
|ESPN] - College Basketball: Kansas 
at Oklahoma Live. 

6:05 P.M. 
CD - Sanford and Son 

6:30 P.M. 
O.0 - Wheel of Fortune. 
- New Newlywed Game 
- Card Sharks 
- Benson 
CD - Hollywood Squares 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Atlanta Hawks 
03 - Encuentro Astrologico 
63 - M»A*S*H 
03 - Headline News 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Once Bitten* (CC) 

6:35 P.M. 
CD - Honey mooners 

7:00 P.M. 
0- Shell Game 
00- Cosby Show (CC). In Stereo. 
O CD - Our World (CC). 
- MOVIE: 'The Legend of Lizzie 
Borden* 

CD - Wild America: Woodies and 
Hoodies (CC). 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
03 - Novela: Atrevete 
63 - MOVIE: 'Marathon Man* 
63 - Windy City Alive 

7:05 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Coogan's Bluff' 

7:30 P.M. 
- Family Ties (CC). Part 2 of 
3. In Stereo. 

CD - This Old House (CC). 
CD - In Remembrance of Martin 

8:00 P.M. 
- Simon & Simon 
- Cheers (CC). In Stereo. 
O CD - Colbys (CC). 
CD - Nature (CC). Part 3, (R) In 
Stereo. 
03 - Ayuda! 

03 - MacNeit-Lehrer Newshour 
03 - Closer Look 



[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Act of Vengeance' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

[ESPN] - College Basketball: Wake 
Forest at North Carolina State Live. 

8:30 P.M. 
- Night Court 
CD - Sneak Previews In Stereo. 
63 - Young at Heart 

9:00 P.M. 
- Knots Landing (CC). 
O - LA. Law In Stereo. 
O CD -20/20 (CC). 
- News 

CD - In Remembrance of Martin 
CD- Mystery: Agatha Christie's Miss 
Marple (CC). Part 3. 
CD - Bowling Game 
03 - Novela: El Sol Sale para Todos 
63 - Nightly Business Report 
63 - James Robison 

9:05 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Fort Worth' 

9:30 P.M. 
63 - Entertainment Tonight 
03 - Tony Brown's Journal 
63 - 700 Club 

10:00 P.M. 
O O CD - News 
- Honeymooners 
CD - Outdoor Wisconsin 
CD - Nightly Business Report 
CD - Twilight Zone 
03 - Informacion 26 
03 - Late Show: Starring Joan Riv- 
ers 
63 - Hatha Yoga 

[HBO] - Inside the NFL In Stereo. 
Jespn) - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunden The Final Four Live. 

10:30 P.M. 
- Night Heat 
O - Magnum, P.I. 
- Tonight Show In Stereo. 
- Barney Miller 
O - ABC News Nlghtiine 
CD - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 
CD - Centennial 
CD - M*A»S»H 
CD - Tonight Show 
CD - Novela: El Hl|o de Angela Maria 
ED - We're Cooking Now 
63 - Headline News 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
10:55 P.M. 
CD - World of Audubon 
11:00 P.M. 
- Hart to Hart 
O - MOVIE: 'Stalk the Wild Child' 
CD - Odd Couple 
£D - Sanford and Son 
£9 - Magic ot Decorative Painting 
60) -Jim & Tammy 
[HBO] - MOVIE: The New Kids' <CC) 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Presents 

11:30 P.M. 
O - Late Night with David Let- 
terman In Stereo, 
- MOVIE: 'Red Line 7000' 
CD - Bix Lives 
CD - Agony 

CD - Entertainment Tonight 
CD - Carol Burnett and Friends 
03 - Cinema 26 
63 - Too Close for Comfort 
[ESPN] - Volleyball: Tournament of 
Champions (R). 

1 1:40 P.M. 
- MOVIE: 'The Last Survivors' 

11:50 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Days of Wine and 
' Roses' 

12:00 A.M. 
- Harry 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
CD - ABC News Nightline 
CD - 1*2 O'Clock High 
03 - Benny Hill 
03 - Jimmy Swaggart 

12:30 A.M. 
O - Million Dollar Chance of a Life- 
time 

0-News(R). 
CD-I. Claudius 
CD - Police Woman 
63 - Entertainment Tonight 
63 r 700 Club 
|ESPN] - To Be Announced. 

12:35 AM. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Almost You' (CC) 



1:00 A.M. • 
- CBS News Nightwatch 
- News (R). 
- New Crosswits 
- Falcon Crest 
- Tales of the Unexpected 
63 - Alfred Hitchcock Presents 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:30 A.M. 
O - Crook and Chase 
- Warner Saunders 
O - News (R). 
CD - CNN News ' 
CD - News 

63 - Celebrate With Jessie Dixon. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

2:00 A.M. 
- Strike It Rich 

- News 

O - MOVIE: 'The Falcon in Mexico' 

- Odd Couple 

CD - Tales of the Unexpected 

63 - Nite Lite 

[ESPN] - Top Rank Boxing from Las 

Vegas, NV (R). 



FRIDAY 
1/16/87 



12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN| - College Basketball: Kansas 
at Oklahoma (R). 

12:05 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Gunsmoke* 

12:30 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'The Love God?' - - 

1:00 P.M. 
CD - Snap of Tap and the Razzma- 
tazz of Jazz 

[HBO] - Phil Collins: No Jacket Re- 
quired in Stereo. 

2:00 P.M 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Dusty' 
lESPNl - College Basketball: Wake 
Forest at North Carolina State (R). 

3:30 P.M. 
IHUO j - MOVIE: 'Welcome Home' 

4:00 P.M. 
IHBO] - MOVIE: 'The Philadelphia 
Experiment* (CC) 
IESPN] - NFL Films 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN| - NFL Films Presents 

4:40 P.M. 
Q3 - Today's Racing 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
(ESPN) - Speedweek 

6:00 P.M. 
O O CD - News 
- Barney Miller 
CD CD - MacNell-Lehrer Newshour 
CD - Gimme a Break 
€9 - Informacion 26 
€S - Three's Company 
03 - And Baby Makes Two 
[HBO] - Inside the NFL In Stereo. 
[ESPNJ - SportsCenter 
6:05 P.M. 
CD - Sanford and Son 
6:30 P.M. 
O O - Wheel of Fortune 
- New Newlywed Game 
- Card Sharks . 
- Benson 
CD - Hollywood Squares 
CD - Leave It to Beaver 
03 - Encuentro Astrologico 
03 - M'A'S'H 
03 - Film Teature 
03 - Headline News 
[ESPN] - Kickboxing Live. 

6:35 P.M. 
CD - Honeymooners 

7:00 P.M. 
- Garfield in Paradise (R). 
- Stingray In Stereo. 
O CD - Webster (CC). 
- MOVIE: 'Fantastic Voyage' 
CD CD - Washington Week in Review 
CD - MOVIE: 'The Black Stallion' 
Q3 - Novela: Atrevete 
03 - MOVIE: 'The Sign of Zorro* 
03 - Arctic Window 
03 - Windy City Alive 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Chorus Line: The 
Movie' (CC) In Stereo. 



11 
1 



.A 



FREE SPINAL EXAMINATION 



To AH S*c»o»i» / 

et |K« 

To Thfo»l - 

To Upo*' lu*»9* 



To I u"9» — - 
lo 51o«T.»th - 



- T6 «m«i|* — S— 
To Ot»i»»«- 

to •«-■•'•— ~~-~ 
To Apponilla - ' a 

To r.*nll»»«y-'' 
/ / 

To Bud*)— / 



The- ■-..McM.oh ol /ou. spine has a clireci relationship to your 
twatfh Thii sfcnfll com is \m rrhflme 6' th* body " you aw 
's.i.-u'.fj int- sc^.ji'. ■•!•. .ii numbness «" lhc iu<mNoi 'oel electric 
shock M'ns.it..»ns uni spois told spots, constant stinging or 
pve*i burning stances ate yn.i- spine is not .n the condition it 
-.n.uldtiL' m tuesn arc Signs nl sflvo«» chrpiifC nerve irritation 

a»m v..iiiii in* i .iron lor before imomi serious wweversiDle 

, , fn:. | ti..l1njns ;'CCUI 

Pinched nerves can be the cause of: 

1 Headaches *. Difficulty Breathing 

2 Neck Pain 5. Lower Back Pain. 

3 Shoulder Pain Hip Pain, and Pain 
or Knee Rain Down the. Legs^ 

*Vi« i '•••"■ ">"■**' ■"'"■■ " ■■■■■■ "&*»»> - 1 ■.M.M/ii'f.n .•>' me 

.„ [ , „ . „.'.'.,-i- siWvpi i"w '••■ >"i'i"P'-ii>-. iii-i.'o<"<:i'" Ioms 
vflKK *..Mt.M>ni* rttnJ- ■ • i ti."'.il ■'» '•""■ '"■ "i-'-""'"il'-d 

Chiropractic Centre of Grayslake 
Most insurance - 11 N.Siusser. Grayslake 
'Accepted . . 223-6860 






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Lakeland Newspaper* 1C 



Thursday, January *t 5. *t 987 



1967 



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7:05 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball; Houston Rock- 
els at Detroit Pistons Live. 

7:30 P.M. 
O O - Snoopy's Getting Married, 
Charlie Brown (R). 
O CD - Mr. Belvedere (CC). 
(E - Wall Street With Louis Rukey- 
ser 
CD - Wall Street Week 

8:00 P.M. 
OO- MOVIE: 'An American Har- 
vest* 

O O - Miami Vice Part 2 of 2, In 
Stereo. 
O <B - Gung Ho (CC). 

CD - Business of Wisconsin 
CD - Chicago Week in Review 
03 - Se Anunciara 
£0 - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 
© - Dean 'N Mary 
(ESPN | - Top Rank Boxing from At- 
lantic City, NJ Live. 

8:30 P.M. 
O CD - Dads (CC). 
CD - Market to Market 
CD - Arthur C. Clarke's World of 
Strange Powers 
© - Jimmy Swaggart 
9:00 P.M. 
O - Crime Slory In Stereo. 
O CD - Starman (CC). 
© - News 
CD - Melody Makers - 
CD - National Geographic Special: 
Lions of the African Night (CC). In 
Stereo. 

© - Novela: El So) Sale para Todos 
ffi - Entertainment Tonight 
© - Nightly Business Report 
tHB0| - MOVIE: 'Jewel of the Nile' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

9:15 P.M. 
CD - Bowling Game ' 

9:20 P.M. 
CD - Sanford and Son 
9:30 P.M. 
© - Honeymooners. 
© - To Be Announced. 
QD- 700 Club 

9:50 P.M. 
CD - Night Tracks Power Play In 
Stereo. 

1 0:00 P.M. 
O O O CD - News 
O - Honeymooners 
CD - National Geographic Special: 
Lions of the African Night (CC). In 
Stereo. 

CD - Nightly Business Report 
© - fnformacion 26 

E0 - Late Show: Starring Joan Riv- 
ers 
© - Hatha Yoga 

IESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 

Downunden The Final Four Live. 
10:15 P.M. 

CD - Benny Hill Show 
10:30 P.M. 

- Keep On Cruisin' 

O O - Magnum, P.I. 

- Tonight Show In Stereo. 

O - Barney Miller 

- ABC News Nightline 

CD - MOVIE: 'Code of Scotland Yard' 

CD - M'A'S^H 

CD - Tonight Show 

© - Cinema 26 

© - We're Cooking Now 

© - Headline News 

10:50 P.M. 

CD - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

IHBO] - 1st & Ten In Stereo. 
11:00 P.M. 

O - Hart to Hart 

O - MOVIE: 'Devil's Own* 

CD - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 

CD - Odd Couple 

© - Sanford and Son 

© - Madeleine Cooks 

© - Jim & Tammy 

11:20 P.M. 

■HBO] - MOVIE: 'Private Resort* 
11:30 P.M. 

Q - Friday Night Videos In 

Stereo. 

- MOVIE: 'The Legend of Hell 
House' 

CD - Entertainment Tonight 
CD - Carol Burnett and Friends 
© - Ted Knight Show 
11:40 P.M. 
- McGarrett (R). 

11:50 P.M. 
CD - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

12:00 A.M. 
- Hawaii Five-0 
(D - Great Detective 
CD - ABC News Nightline 
CD - Solid Gold 
© - El Club 700 
© - Benny Hill 
© - Jimmy Swaggart 

12:30 A.M. 
CD - Blueberry Hill 
© - Entertainment Tonight 
© - 700 Club 

12:40 A.M. 
- This Is the NFL 

12:45 A.M. 
[HBOJ - Inside the NFL In Stereo. 

12:50 A.M. 
CD - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

12:55 A.M. 
CD - CNN News 

1:00 A.M. 
O - Fame 

- Rock 'n Roll Evening News 
- Falcon Crest 
O - Tales of the Unexpected 
© - Check It Outl 

1:10 A.M. 
- MOVIE: 'To Be Announced' 

1:30 A.M. 
O - News (R). 
- Twilight Zone 
CD - News 
© - Ughtmusic 

1:45 A.M. 



(HBO] - MOVIE: 'Assault on Precinct 
13' 

1:50 A.M, 
CD - Night Tracks In Stereo, 

2:00 A.M. 
O -News (R). 
fi* — News 

O - MOVIE: 'Falcon in Hollywood' 
- Odd Couple 
CD - Tales of the Unexpected 
© - Nite Lite 
IESPN) - SportsCenter 

SATURDAY 

1/17/87 

5:00 A.M. 
CD - AG Week 
CD - CNN News 
© - Jim & Tammy 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Blue Line' 
(ESPN) - 1986 Double Brown Iron 
Man Triathlon Championship (R). 

5:30 A.M. 
- Morning Stretch 
- New Music City USA 
- Superman 
© - U.S. Farm Report 
CD - Between the Lines 
6:00 A.M. 
O - Newday Chicago 
- Kids Are People Too 
- Lassie 
- Cartoons 
© - Look In 
CD - Get Smart 
© - It's Your Business 
© - Esta Semana en Beisbol 
© - Shape Up 
(HBO) - MOVIE: *BMX Bandits' 
(ESPN] - Auto Racing 

6:15 A.M. 
- Buyer's Forum 

6:30 A.M. 
CD - Young Universe 
O - Agriculture U.S.A. 
- Our Place 
- Teen Wolf 
- Issues Unlimited 
© - Hogan's Heroes 
© - Milwaukee Observer 
© - Action 60s 
IEspn] -SportsCenter 
7:00 A.M. 
- Berenstain Bears (CC). 
- Klssyfur 

O © - The Wuizles (CC). 
- U.S. Farm Report 
© - Market to Market 
© - Rockin' & Rollin* With Phil 
Spector 

© - Championship Wrestling 
© - Inhumanoids 
© - News 
(ESPN] - Speedweek 

7:30 A.M. 
- Wildfire 
Q - Gummi Bears 
O © - Care Bears Family (CC). 
- The World Tomorrow 

© - Victory Garden 

© - Puttin' on the Kids 

© - Gamer Ted Armstrong 

© - Superbook 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Troll' In Stereo. 

[ESPN| - Jimmy Ballard Golf Connec- 
tion 

8:00 A.M. 

- Muppet Babies 

O - Smurfs 

O © - Flintstone Kids (CC). 



- Charjando 

© - Hometime; Bathrooms 

© - Newton's Apple (CC). 

© - National Geographic Explorer 

© - Muppets 

© - Bombay Broadcasting Network 

© - Inhumanoids 

© - Toddler's Friends 

(ESPN) - Inside the PGA Tour 

8:30 A.M. 
© - Minority Business Report 
© - Outdoor Wisconsin 
© - Motorweek 

© - Telephone Auction Shopping 
Program 

© - MOVIE: 'Blondie Meets the 
Boss' 

© - Secret Place 
iesPN| - Action Outdoors with Julius 
Boros 

9:00 A.M. 
O - Pee Wee's Playhouse 
O © - Real Ghostbusters (CC). 
- People to People 
© - This Old House (CC). 
© - Woodwright's Shop 
© - Sangeeta Presents... 
© - Davey & Goliath 
IHBO] - Inside the NFL In Stereo. 
. (ESPN] -Bowling: 1986 High Rollers 
Tournament (R). 

9:30 A.M. 
O - Teen Wolf 
O - Alvin & the Chipmunks 
© - Pound Puppies 
O - Wild Kingdom 
© - Motorweek 
© - Hometime (CC). 
© - Weekend Open House 
© - Flying House 

10:00 A.M. 
- Galaxy High 
- Foofur 

© - Bugs Bunny and Tweety 
Show 

- Superman 

© - Sneak Previews In Stereo. 
© - CNN News 

ffi - MOVIE: 'Mutiny on the Bounty' 
m - MOVIE: 'Springfield Rifle' 
© - Ernest Angley 
© - Comedy Classics 
© - Joy Junction 
IHBO] - MOVIE: 'National Lampoon's 
European Vacation' 
(ESPN] - Mark Sosln's Salt Water 
Journal 

10:30 A.M. 



0- CBS Storybreak 

O - Fame 

- Punky Brewster 

O © - All-New Ewoks 

- Wild, Wild West 

© - Modern Maturity 

© - Circle Square 

(ESPN] - Tom Mann Outdoors 

11:00 A.M. 
00- Hulk Hogan's Rock V Wres- 
tling 

- Lazer Tag Academy 
© - ABC Weekend Special: The 
Adventures of a Two-Minute Were- 
wolf (CC). Part 2 of 2, (R). 
© - Wall Street With Louis Rukey- 
ser 

© - Alabare 

© - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
© - German Professional Soccer 
© - Ughtmusic 
(ESPN) - Sportscenter Saturday 

11:30 A.M. 
O - America's Top Ten 
- Kidd Video 

O © - ABC News Health Program 
- MOVIE: 'Arrow In the Dust' 
© - Sesame Street (CC). 
© - Solo Act 

(HBO] - MOVIE: 'Mommie Dearest' 
|ESPN] - Top Rank Boxing from At- 
lantic City, NJ 

12:00 P.M. 
- Common Ground 
O - Legacy of a Dream 
0- 1986 All Pro Team 
- Positively Milwaukee 
O - American Bandstand 
© - War: A Com m e ntary by G wy nne 
Dyer 

© - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
©- Hee Haw 
© - El Club del Nino 
© - Comedy Classics 
© - MOVIE: 'Of Human Bondage' 
© - Weekend Gardener 

12:30 P.M. 
- Gladiators of Ice 
- This Is the NFL 
O - To Be Announced. 
© - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
© - La Hora de la Decision 
©-CNN News 

12:45 P.M. 
© - MOVIE: 'Johnny Eager' 

1:00 P.M. 
- College Basketball: Villan- 
ova at Virginia Live. 
O - War of the Stars 
- Heroes: Made in the U.S.A. 
© - Owl/TV 

© - Nature (CC). Part 3, (R) In 
Stereo. 

© - Babe Winkleman's Good Fish- 
ing 

© - MOVIE: 'Requiem tor a Falling 
Star' 

© - Chinese Spotlight 
© - Buck Rogers 
©- 100% Uving 
(ESPN1 - Steve Garvey Tennis Clas- 
sic 

1:30 P.M. 
O - National Geographic on Assign- 
ment 

- College Basketball: Games to 
be Announced Live. 
- MOVIE: "Tarzan and the Hun- 
tress" 

©- 3-2-1, Contact (CC). 
© - Championship Fishing 
© - Back Pain 

1:45 P.M. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'A View to a Kill' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

2:00 P.M. 
O © - Pro Bowlers Tour: AC Delco 
Classic Live. 

© - All Creatures Great and Small 1 1 
© - Bodywatch (CC). 
© - Wonderful World of Disney: 
The Swamp Fox 

© - Magic of Decorative Painting 
© - Vlvere al 100 Per Cento 
(ESPN) - 1987 Budweiser Truck and 
Tractor Pull Championships 

2:30 P.M. 
O - MOVIE: 'The Sign of Zorro' 
© - Wild America (CC). 
© - Kung Fu 
© - People, Pete & Dr. Marc 

3:00 P.M. 
- College Basketball: West 
Virginia at Notre Dame or UNLV at 
Oklahoma Live. 



- Soul Train 

© - Nature (CC). Part 3. (R) In 

Stereo, 

© - Magic of Oil Painting 

© - TV Arabic Hour, Inc 

© - Star Trek 

© - Great Chefs of Chicago 

© - Yi Ye Avila 

(ESPN) - Fishin' Hole 

3:05 P.M. 
© - Wild, Wild World of Animals 
3:30 P.M. 

- Golf: Bob Hope Chrysler Clas- 
sic Live. 

© - Wide World of Sports 

© - Yan Can Cook 

© - Dukes of Hazzard 

© - We're Cooking Now 

© - Vicente Montano 
3:35 P.M. 

© - Saltwater Angler with Rip Pal 

lot 

4:00 P.M. 

- Good Times 

© - German Professional Soccer 

© - Rod & Reel 

© - Beautiful Korea 

© - Diff rent Strokes 

© - Housemanship 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Watershtp Down' 

(ESPN] - NFL Films 

4:05 P.M. 

© - Roland Martin 

4:30 P.M. 



O - You Write the Songs 

- It's a Living 

© - Justin Wilson's Louisiana 

Cookln' 

© - Dancin' to the Hits 

© - What's Happening Nowll 

© - Woodwright's Shop 

© - Nuestro Pueblo Hlspano 

(ESPN) - NFL Films 

4:35 P.M. 
© - Fishin' With Orlando Wilson 

5:00 P.M. 
- People 

a - Fight Back With David Horowitz 
O - News 
- Charles in Charge 
©- Masterpiece Theatre: Goodbye 
Mr. Chips (CC). Part 2. 
© - This Old House (CC). 
ffl- Dream Girl U.S.A 
© - Puttin' on the Hits 
© - Polonia Today 
© - Small Wonder 
© - Painting With llona 
[ESPN] - Speedweek 

5:05 P.M. 
© - World Championship Wrestling 

5:30 P.M. 
- CBS News 
O - NBC News 
- Saturday Report 
O © - ABC News 
- One Big Family 
© - Frugal Gourmet 
© - Dance Fever 
© - Midwest Outdoors Limited 
© - Too Close for Comfort 
© - Bluegrass Ramble 
© - Herald of Truth 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Troll' In Stereo. 
(ESPN] - Scholastic Sports America 

6:00 P.M. 
O © - News 
- American Promise: Dreams on 
Hold 
- Small Wonder 

- Black Ministers 

- What a Countryl 

© - Wisconsin Magazine 

© - Sneak Previews In Stereo. 

© - Solid Gold 

© - Yugoslav-American Show 

© - 9 to 5 

© - Computer Chronicles 

© - Outdoors With Art Reid 

[ESPN] - Sportscenter Saturday 

6:30 P.M. 
- Bears '86 
O O - Wheel of Fortune 
- Throb 
J. It's a Uving 
- At the Movies 
© - McLaughlin Group 
© - 9 to 5 

© - To Be Announced. 
© - Three's Company 
© - European Journal 
© - Headline News 
[ESPN] - NHL Hockey: Teams to Be 
Announced Live. 

7:00 P.M. 
- Outlaws 

O - Facts of Life (CC). In Stereo. 
O © - Sidekicks (CC). 
- Hogan's Heroes 
© - Wonderworks: Walking on Air 
(CC). 

© - MOVIE: 'The Burglars' 
© - Star Search 
© - Billy Egr Ministries 
© - MOVIE: 'Rider on the Rain* 
© - Firing Line 
© - In Touch 

|HBO] - MOVIE: 'National Lampoon's 
European Vacation' 

7:05 P.M. 
© - MOVIE: The Man From Lara- 
mie' 

7:30 P.M. 
O - 227 In Stereo. 
O © - Sledge Hammer (CC). 
- College Basketball: Southern 
Florida at DePaul 
© - Rock of Ages 

8:00 P.M. 
O - MOVIE: 'Sister Margaret 
and the Saturday Night Ladies' (CC) 
O - Golden Girls (CC). In Stereo. 
O © - Ohara PREMIERE (CC). 
© - Planet for the Taking 
© - Lifestyles of the Rich and Fa- 
mous 

© - Woman to Woman 
© - Day of Discovery 
8:30 P.M. 
O - Amen In Stereo. 
© - Way of Deliverance 
© - Dwight Thompson 
[HBO] - Not Necessarily the News In 
Stereo. 



9:00 P.M. 
Q - Hunter In Stereo. 
© - Spenser For Hire (CC). 
© - Mystery: Agatha Christie's Miss 
Marple (CC). Part 3. 
© - Alfred Hitchcock Hour 
© - Love Boat 
© - To Be Announced: 
© -Chicago Bears Highlights 
© - Manchild Revisited: A Com- 
mentary by Claude Brown 
[HBO] - Don Johnson: The Making of 
Heartbeat In Stereo. 

9:05 P.M. 
© - Portrait of America: Michigan 

9:30 P.M. 
- News 

© - W.V. Grant 

© - What a Fellowship 

(ESPN) - NFL Films 

10:00 P.M. 
O O © - News 
© - Bless Me Father 
© - Image Union 
© - Night Gallery 
© - The World Tomorrow 
© - M«A»S*H 
© - Innovation 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Cease Fire' 
[ESPN) - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunden The Final Four Uve. 

10:05 P.M. . 
© - Night Tracks Chartbusters In 
Stereo. 

10:30 P.M. 
- StsJkel & Ebert & the Movies 
O - 19th Annual NAACP Image 
Awards 

- MOVIE: 'Ice Station Zebra' 
O - ABC News 

- MOVIE: 'Sands of Iwo Jima" 
© - Austin City Limits 
© - Mystery: Agatha Christie's Miss 
Marple (CC). Part 3. 
© - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars 

© - MOVIE: 'Frankenstein Must Be 
Destroyed' 

© - American Art Forum 
© - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
© - National Nutrition Quiz 
© - Saturday Nile Sing 
IESPN] - Sportscenter Saturday 

10:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars 

11:00 P.M. 
O - MOVIE: 'To Be Announced' 
© - God Uses Ordinary People 
(ESPN] - World Class Championship 
Wrestling 

1 1:05 P.M. 
© - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

11:30 P.M. 
© - Country Express 
© - Blake's 7 
© - To Be Announced. 
© - MOVIE: 'Jinxed!' 
© - Uberty Hour 

11:40 P.M. 
(HBO) - MOVIE: 'A View to a Kill' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

12:00 A.M. 
O - Rock 'n Roll Evening News 
- Ghost Stories/Circle of Fear 
© - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 
© - Uberty Hour 
(ESPN) - Rollermania 

12:05 A.M. 
© - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

12:20 A.M. 
© - MOVIE: 'Design for Scandal' 

12:30 A.M. 
- Tales from the Darks) de 
© - Monster of the Mat 
© - Time of Deliverance 

12:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 

1:00 A.M. 
O - MTV Top 20 Video Countdown 
- MOVIE: 'Cyrano de Bergerac" 
0- Phyllis 

©- Uving Daily With the Scriptures 
(ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:05 A.M. 
© - Night Tracks In Stereo. 

1:25 A.M. 
- MOVIE: 'Apache' 

1:30 A.M. 
- You Write the Songs 
© - MOVIE: 'Exorcist II: The Her- 
etic' 

© - MTV Top 20 Video Countdown 
© - CNN News 
IESPN) - SportsCenter 

1:55 A.M. 
|HBOJ - MOVIE: 'Creepshow' In 
Stereo. 



2:00 A.M. 
- Today's Business-Weekend 
O - News (R). 
O-SCTV 

© - Saturday Nite Sing 
Iespn] - NHL Hockey: Teams to Be 
Announced (R). . . 

SUNDAY 
1/18/87 

5:00 A.M. 
© - CNN News 
© - Ughtmusic 

(ESPN) - Swimming: McDonald's 
U.S. Open Championships (R). 

5:30 A.M. 
- For Our Times 
- Christian Science Monitor Re- 
ports 

© - The World Tomorrow 
© - News 
© - Better Way 

5:45 A.M. 
© - MOVIE: 'Emperor of the North 
Pole' 

6:00 A.M. 
- Newday Chicago 
- Insight 
- James Kennedy 
© - It Is Written 
© - America's Black Forum 
© - Jewish Jewels 

6:05 A.M. 
(HBO) - Survival Series 
6:30 A.M. 
- Objective: Jobs 
O - This Is the Ufe 
- New Zoo Revue 
- Sunday Mass 
- Three Score/Community Cal- 
endar 

© - Tom & Jerry and Friends 
© - Glory to God 
© - Jimmy Swaggart 
© - Paul Yonggi Cho 
6:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 
- What's Nu7 

7:00 A.M. 
- Different Drummers 
O - Sunday Morning Worship 
- Hickory Hideout 
- Robert Schuller 
© - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
© - Sesame Street (CC). 
© - Funtastlc World of Hanna- 
Barbera 

© - Divine Plan 
© - Rejoice In the Lord 
(HBOJ - MOVIE: 'Sesame Street Pre* 
sents: Follow That Bird' (CC) In 
Stereo, 

[ESPN1 - SportsCenter 
7:30 A.M. 
O - Magic Door 
© - The World Tomorrow 
- Warner Saunders (R). 
- Heritage of Faith 
© - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
© - Or. Dekruytor . 
IESPN) - College Football '86: A 
Look Back 

8:00 A.M. 
- CBS News Sunday Morning 
O - W.V. Grant 

- Fight Back With David Hof owllz 
- CBS Sunday. Morning News 
- Sunday Mass 
© - Sesame Street (CC). 
© - Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 
© - Frederick K. Price 
© - Oral Roberts 
© - TV High School 
© - Ben Haden 
(ESPN) - Fishin' Hole 
8:30 A.M. 

O - Jimmy Swaggart 

- Everyman 

- Porky Pig 

© - Sesame Street (CC). 

© - Jem 

© - Tom & Jerry 

© - TV High School 

© - Uving Stones 

(HBO] - Fraggle Rock (CC). 
8:35 A.M. 

© - Andy Griffith 

9:00 A.M. 

- Friends 

- Bugs Bunny 

© - Sesame Street (CC). 

© - Telethon 

© - Addams Family 

© - Jimmy Swaggart 

© - Funtastic World of Hanrta- 

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© - Focus on Society 

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|HBO| - Flashback: The Hindenburg- 

...Ship of Doom 

(ESPN] - Scholastic Sports America 

9:05 A.M. 
CD -Good News 

9:30 A.M. 
© - Face the Nation 
O- Universal Wrestling Federation 
- Gamut 
O - Oral Roberts 
O-Jem 

CD - Real Adventure of Sherlock 
Jones and Proctor Watson 
CD - The Munsters 
ED - Focus on Society 
03 - Lloyd Ogilvie 
[H80J- MOVIE: "Murphy's Romance' 
(CC) 

|ESPN| - Sportscenter Sunday: This 
Week in Sports 

9:35 A.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Northwest Passage' 

9:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 

10:00 A.M. 
O - Lee Phillip Show 
Q - Essence 
O - The World Tomorrow 
O - Cisco Kid 
CD - Perkins Family 
CD - CNN News 
CD - Dukes of Hazxard 
ED - Robert Schuller 
ED - Growing Years 
ED - Monument of Faith 

10:30 A.M. 
O - Newsmakers 
Q - Bowling With the Champs. 
- Don't Miss 
O - Answer Is Love 
O - The Lone Ranger 
CD - Real Adventures of Sherlock 
Jones and Proctor Watson: Too 
Many 100's (CC). 
EB - The Flintstones 
ED - Principles of Accounting 
[ESPN] - Sportscenter's NFL Game- 
day 

10:45 A.M. 
O - Barry Silberg/Dr. Gene Juka- 
bek 

11:00 A.M. 
O O - NBA Basketball: Houston 
Rockets at Boston Celtics Live, 
- City Desk 
- Rawhide 
CD - Wisconsin Magazine 
CD - Tony Brown's Journal 
CD - Diff'rent Strokes 
ED - Dwight Thompson 
60 - Brady Bunch 
ED - MOVIE: 'Broadway Melody of 
1940' 

ED - Annomted Word 
(ESPNJ - NFL's Superstars 

11:30 A.M. 
O - Closer Look 
- Meet the Press 
CD - Adam Smith's Money World 
CD - Bosom Buddies 
ED - Happy Days 
(HBO) - MOVIE: 'Once Bitten' (CC) 
I espn | - College Basketball: 1983 
Final Four Highlights 

12:00 P.M. 
Q - College Basketball: North 
Carolina State at North Carolina 
Live. 

- MOVIE: 'Charlie Chan in the 
City of Darkness' 

CD - Washington Week in Review 
(CC). 

CD - Firing Line 
CD - MOVIE: 'The Long Riders' 
ED - Apostolic Church of God 
EB - MOVIE: 'The Sign of Zorro' 
ED - Living Way 

[ESPN! - Tennis: Pringles Light Pro- 
Celebrity Classic 

12:15 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Three Godfathers' 

12:30 P.M. 
CD - Business of Wisconsin 
ED - In Reality 

12:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 

1:00 P.M. 
CD - Great Performances: Dance in 
America In Stereo. 
CO - John McLaughlin's One on One 
CD - Telethon Continued. 
ED - Telethon; Lives in Crisis 
ED - Woman to Woman 
ED - Feedback 

|HBO| - MOVIE: 'Iron Eagle' (CC) In 
Stereo. 

(ESPN) - Bodybuilding: 1986 AAU 
Ms. Universe Championship (R). 

1:30 P.M. 
- College Basketball: Syra- 
cuse at Michigan Live. 
- MOVIE: 'Superbug: Super 
Agent' 

CO - Wall Street Week With Louis 
Rukeyser: The New Tax Law and You 

2:00 P.M. 
O - SportsWorld 
- SportsWorld Tape Delayed. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Footiight Parade' 
CD - MOVIE: 'Murphy's War' 
ED - MOVIE: 'The Four Feathers' 
ED - Chinese 
6D - Closer Look 

|ESPN| - MISL Soccer: Baltimore 
Blast at Cleveland Force Live. 

2:20 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Conflict' 
2:30 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Red River' 
«D -Young at Heart 

2:45 P.M. 
Q - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 

3:00 P.M. 
EQ - Wind at One's Fingertips 
ED - Dean 'N Mary 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Shaker Run 



3:30 P.M. 
O - CBS Sports'Sunday 
O - Golf: Bob Hope Chrysler 
Classic Live. 

- MOVIE: 'Here Come the Tigers' 
ED - Larry Jones 

4:00 P.M. 
CD - Play More Bridge 
CD - Dining In France 
CD - MOVIE: 'Q'Hara's Wife' 
ED - Telethon: Lives in Crisis Contin- 
ued. 

€0 - MOVIE: 'The Young Lions' 
ED - Firing Line 
ED - Victory in Jesus 
|ESPN| - NFL Films 

4:30 P.M. 
CD - Adam Smith's Money World 
•CD- French Chef 
ED - Today in Bible Prophecy 
[HBO| - Fraggle Rock (CC). 
[ESPN] - NFL Films 

5:00 P.M. 
O - CBS News 

- Medical Marvels 

CD - Doctor Who: Attack of the Cy- 

bermen 

CD - Chicago Sunday Evening Club 

ED - John McLaughlin's One on One 

ED - John Ankerberg 

(HBO] -MOVIE: 'This. Is Elvis'. In 

Stereo. 

[ESPN) - World Cup Skiing: Men's 

Super G 

5:30 P.M. 
O - News 
- NBC News 
- Puttiii' on the Hits 
CD - New Leave It to Beaver 
ED - McLaughlin Group 
ED - James Kennedy 

5:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars Continued. 

6:00 P.M. 
0-60 Minutes 
O - Our House (CC). In Stereo. 
O - Disney Sunday Movie: Great 
Moments In Disney Animation (CC). 
- Fame 

CD - Wonderworks: Walking on Air 
(CC). 

CO - MOVIE: 'Out on a Limb' (CC) 
Part 1 of 2. 

CD - World Championship Wrestling 
CD - Telethon: Seven Hundred Club 
ED - Tony Brown's Journal 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
6:30 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'All Creatures Great 
and Small' 

ED - America's Black Forum 
ED - Prophecy Marches On 

[ESPN) - Subaru Ski World 
7:00 P.M. 

- Murder, She Wrote (CC). 

O - Valerie (CC). In Stereo. 

O - MOVIE: 'Out on a Umb' (CC) 

Part 1 of 2. 

- Heart of America 

CD - Nature: Elephants (CC)! 

CD - To Be Announced. 

CD - National Geographic Explorer 

ED- Telethon: Lives In Crisis Contin- 
ued. 

ED - Star Search 

ED - American Interests 

ED - Kenneth Copeland 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Murphy's Romance' 

(CC) 

(ESPN] - AWA Wrestling 
7:30 P.M. 

O - Easy Street In Stereo. 

ED - Living Body 

8:00 P.M. 

O - MOVIE: 'Warm Hearts. Cold 

Feet' (CC) 

O - MOVIE: 'Blood Vows: The 

Story of a Mafia Wife' (CC) In Stereo. 

- Love Boat 

CD- Masterpiece Theatre: Goodbye 

Mr. Chips (CC). Part 3. 

CD - Day in the Life of America 
' ED - Wonderful World of Disney 

ED - Mechanical Universe 

ED - Jerry Falwell 

8:30 P.M. 

ED - Mechanical Universe 
9:00 P.M. 
' - News 

CD - MOVIE: 'King: Montgomery to 

Memphis' 

CD - Masterpiece Theatre: Goodbye 

Mr. Chips (CC). Part 3. 

CD - ABC News (CC). 
CD - Coors Sports Page 
60 - Telethon: Lives In Crisis Contin- 
ued, 

EB- 32 on Location 
ED - Innovation 
ED - Chicago Gospel Hour 
IHBOl - 1st & Ten In Stereo. 
[ESPN] - Rollermania 

9:15 P.M. 
CD - To Be Announced. 
9:30 P.M. 

CD - Jerry Falwell 

EB - Alfred Hitchcock Presents 

ED - Vistas 

[HBO] - MOVIE; 'Iron Eagle' (CC) In 

Stereo. 

10:00 P.M. 

O O CD - News 

- Tales from the Darkslde 

CD - Monty Python's Flying Circus 

CD -Telethon: Seven Hundred Club. 

Continued. 

ED - M # A'S*H 

ED - Japan: The Living Tradition 

ED - In Touch 

[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 

Downunder: The Final Four Live. 
10:25 P.M. 

- Sports Sunday 

10:30 P.M. 

- Bears Extra 

O - Spitting Image: The Ronnie and 

Nancy Show 

O - Barney Miller 



O - Sports Final 
- Lou Grant 

CD- Mystery: Agatha Christie's Miss 
Marple (CC). Part 3. 
CD - Dave Allen at Large 
CD - M»A»S«H 
CD - John Ankerberg 
EB - Honeymooners 
ED - Manchild Revisited: A Com- 
mentary by Claude Brown 

10:45 P.M. 
- CBS News 
- Strictly Business 
- ABC News 

11:00 P.M. 
O - Rockford Files 
- Jeffersons 

O - MOVIE: 'Crime of Innocence' 
CD -Doctor Who 

CD - Siskel & Ebert & the Movies ■ 
CD - Jimmy Swaggart 
ED - Sister E.R. Allen 
EB - Sanford and Son 
ED - Rejoice in the Lord 

11:15 P.M. 
- CBS News 
- Sports Machine 

11:30 P.M. 
- Newsmakers 
- WKRP in Cincinnati ' 
- Charles in Charge 
CD - Risking It All 
CD - Ted Knight Show 
ED - Old Landmark Church i 
EB - Kojak 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Once Bitten' (CC) In 
Stereo. 

11:45 P.M. 
- Don't Miss 

12:00 A.M. 
- Siskel & Ebert & the Movies 
O - MOVIE: *A Fine Pair' 
- Lou Grant 
- At the Movies 
CD - Check It Outl 

CD - The World Tomorrow 

12:15 A.M. 
- Cover Story 
CD - Two Ronnies 

12:30 A.M. 
- Dancin' to the Hits 
- Fame 

CD - To Be Announced. 
CS - Larry Jones 

ED - Crazy Eddie World of Home En- 
tertainment Shopping Network 
EB - Star Search 

12:45 A.M. 
- New Crosswits 

1:00 A.M. 
- CBS News Nightwatch 
- Fantasy Island 
CD - Image Union 
CD - Christian Children's Fund 

1:10 A.M. 
[HBO] -On Location: Robert Klein on 
Broadway In Stereo. 

1:15 A.M. 
- City Desk 
O - MOVIE: 'Condemned Women' 

1:30 A.M. 
- Cannon 
CD - CNN News 
CD - Ghost Story 
CD - Bob Newhart 
ED - Entertainment This Week 
1:45 A.M. 
. 0- Gamut 

2:00 A.M. 
O - News (R). 
- News 
CO - Lucy Show 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 



MONDAY 
1/19/87 



12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN| - MISL Soccer: Baltimore 
Blast at Cleveland Force (R). 

12:05 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Six Bridges to Cross* 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Garbo Talks' (CC) 

2:00 P.M. 
(ESPN] - College Basketball: Teams 
to Be Announced Live. 

3:00 P.M. 
|HBO] - Safe Harbor 

3:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - When We First Met 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films 

4:30 P.M. 
EB - NBA Basketball: Chicago Bulls 
at Indiana Pacers 

[HBO| - MOVIE: 'Eddie and the Cruis- 
ers' 
[ESPN) - Gillette World of Sports 

4:40 P.M. 
ED - Today's Racing . 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
O O CD - News 
- Barney Miller 
CD CD - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 
CD - Gimme a Break 
ED - Informacion 26 
ED - Principles of Accounting 
ED - Way of the Winner 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: St. 
Johns at Pittsburgh Live. 

6:05 P.M. 
CD - Sanford and Son 

6:30 P.M. 
O O - Wheel of Fortune 
- New Newlywed Game 
- Card Sharks 
- Jeffersons 
CD - Hollywood Squares 
CD - Facts of Life 
ED - Encuentro Astrologlco 
ED - TV High School 
ED - Headline News 
[HBO] - Fraggle Rock (CC). 
6:35 P.M. 



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CD - Honeymooners 

7:00 P.M. 
O - Kate & Allie (CC). 
O - A.L.F. In Stereo. 
Q CD - MacGyver (CC). 
- Hogan's Heroes 
CD -The Planet Earth (CC). (R). 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
CD - Love Boat 
ED - Novela: Atrevete 
ED - MOVIE: 'Brian's Song' 
ED - TV High School 
ED - Windy City Alive 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Longshot' 

7:05 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Atlanta Hawks 
at Detroit Pistons 

7:30 P.M. 
- My Sister Sam (CC). 
O - Amazing Stories (CC), In 
Stereo. 

- College Basketball: Indiana 
State at DePaul 

CD - Frugal Gourmet 

ED - Marketing Perspectives 

8:00 P.M. 
- Newhart (CC). 
O - Crime Story (R) In Stereo. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Out on a Limb' 
(CC) Part 2 of 2, 

CD - American Playhouse: All My 
Sons (CC). 

CD - The Planet Earth (CC). (R). 
CD - MOVIE: 'Sahara' 
ED - El Show de Johnny Canales - 
ED - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 
ED - MOVIE: 'To Be Announced' 

IESPN] - College Basketball: Iowa at 

Purdue Live. 

8:30 P.M. 

- Cavanaughs 

ED - The Boy King 

IHBO] - Humor and the Presidency 
9:00 P.M. 

- Cagney & Lacey (CC). 

CD - American Playhouse: All My 

Sons (CC). 

CD - Novela: El Sol Sale para Todos 

ED - Nightly Business Report 
9:20 P.M. 

CD - MOVIE: 'The Great Missouri 

Raid' 

9:30 P.M. 

- News 

ED - Entertainment Tonight 

ED - McLaughlin Group 

ED - 700 Club 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Too Scared to 

Scream' 

10:00 P.M. 

O O CD - News 

CD - Benny Hill Show _ 

ED - Informacion 26 

EB - Late Show: Starring Joan Riv- 
ers 

ED - Hatha Yoga 

IESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 

Downunder: The Final Four Live. 
10:05 P.M. 

CD - World of Survival 
10:30 P.M. 

- Simon & Simon (R). 

O - Magnum, P.I. 

- Best of Carson (R) In Stereo. 

- Barney Miller 

O - ABC News Nighlline 

CD - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 

CO - Centennial 

CD - M»A»S*H 

CD - Tonight Show 



ED - Novela: EI HIjo de Angela Maria 
ED - We're Cooking Now 
ED - Headline News 
[ESPN| - SportsCenter 

11:00 P.M. 
- Hart to Hart 
O - MOVIE: 'Holocaust' Part 1. 
CD - Odd Couple 
EB - Sanford and Son 
ED - Painting With liana 
. ED - Jim & Tammy 
(ESPN) - One on One 

11:05 P.M. 
CD - Nightly Business Report 
CD - National Geographic Explorer 

11:15 P.M. 
[HBO] - Not Necessarily the News In 
Stereo. 

11:30 P.M. 
O - Late Night with David Let- 
terman In Stereo. 
-MOVIE: 'King' Part 1. 
CD - Motorweek 

CD - Agony 

CD - Entertainment Tonight 

CD - MOVIE: 'Fathom' 

ED - Cinema 26 

EB - Too Close for Comfort 

[ESPN] - Fishin' Hole 

11:40 P.M. 
- MOVIE: 'To Be Announced' 

11:45 P.M. 
IHBO) - MOVIE: 'Certain Fury' 

12:00 A.M. 
- Hawaii Five-0 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
CD - ABC News Nightline 
EB - Benny Hill Show 
ED - Jimmy Swaggart 

12:30 A.M. 
O - Million Dollar Chance of a Life- 
time 

- News (R). 
CD-I, Claudius 
CD - Police Woman 
EB - Entertainment Tonight 
ED - 700 Club 

[ESPN) - Auto Racing: Nikkl Lauda 
Explains Formula One 
1:00 A.M. 
- CBS News Nightwatch 
O - News 
- New Crosswits 
- Falcon Crest 
- Tales of the Unexpected 
EB - Alfred Hitchcock Presents 
IESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:05 A.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Fortunes of Captain 
Blood' 

1:15 A.M. 
(HBO) - MOVIE: 'The Breakfast Club' 
(CC) 

1:30 A.M. 
O - Crook and Chase 
- Warner Saunders 
O CD - News 
- Hogan's Heroes 
CO -CNN News 
ED - Dean *N Mary 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
2:00 A.M. 
- Strike it Rich 
- News 

O - MOVIE: 'Murder on the Black- 
board' 

- Odd Couple 
CD - Tales of the Unexpected 
ED - Nite Lite 

IESPN] - College Basketball: Iowa at 
Purdue (R). 



TUESDAY 


1 


1/20/87 




12:00 P.M. 




[ESPN] - College Basketball: St. 




Johns at Pittsburgh (R). 




12:05 P.M. 


' r H 


CD - MOVIE: 'Sign of the Pagan' 




1:00 P.M. 




(HBO] - MOVIE: 'Troll' In Stereo. 




2:00 P.M. 


M 


(ESPN] - Baseball: Equitable Old- 




Timers Classic Series (R), 




2:30 P.M. 




[HBO] - Courage 




3:00 P.M. 




IHBO] - MOVIE: Toby and the Koala 




Bear' 


'■ 


[ESPNI - Fishin* Hole 


1 


4:00 P.M. 


|I 


(ESPN] - NFL Films 




4:30 P.M. 




(HBO] - MOVIE: 'Home from the Hill' 




In Stereo. 




(ESPN] - Scholastic Sports America 


1 


4:40 P.M. 




ED - Today's Racing 




5:00 P.M. 




[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 




5:30 P.M. 




(ESPN] - SportsCenter 




6:00 P.M. 




O O CD - News 




- Barney Miller 




CO CO - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 




CD - Sanford and Son 


•> I 


CD - Gimme a Break 


'* 11 


ED - Informacion 26 


1 


€B - Three's Company 


1 


ED - Growing Years 


. 1 

• 


(ESPN] - College Basketball: Virginia 


Tech at Louisville Live. 


1 


6:30 P.M. 


»> 


O O - Wheel of Fortune 




- New Newlywed Game 


1 


- Card Sharks 
O - Jeffersons 


M 



CD - Hollywood Squares 

CD - Honeymooners 

CD - Facts of Life 

CS - Encuentro Astrologlco 

EB - M»A*S*H. : 

S3 - Principles of Accounting 

€D- CNN News' 

7:00 P.M. 
- Wizard 
O - Matlock In Stereo. 
O CD - Who's the Boss? (CC). 
- MOVIE: 'Sahara' 
CD - Nova: Countdown to the Invisi- 
ble Universe (CC). 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
CD - World of Audubon Specials: 
Galapagos Islands 
CO - Hogan's Heroes 
ED - Novela: Atrevete 
EB - MOVIE: 'Birdman of Atcatraz' 
ED - Communication Skills 
ED - Windy City Alive 
(HBO) - MOVIE: 'The Flamingo Kid' 
(CC) 

7:30 P.M. 
O CB - Growing Pains (CC). 
CD - This Old House (CC). 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Chicago Bulls 
ED - We're Cooking Now 

Dally Listings Continued 
on 6C. 






X 



LAMP 
SHADES 




RUDOLPH' 

GOOD niBMTUM AT PAIR MICH 




Open Daily Except Monday 



MANY SIZES AND 

STYLES TO CHOOSE 

FROM 

"BRING YOUR LAMP 
WITH YOU FOR 
PROPER FIT." < 

j5E!. Bg E as Y Terms 

Rt. 83 & Center St. 

GRAYSLAKE 
[312] 223-5497 



1 



15,1987 




Lakeland Newspapers 3C 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 967 



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ISEE 



Home 



ioujh wuac 

LENDER 



1 l_cnwE.n n 

Federal Savings 

and Loan Association of Lake Countyi 



325 WASHINGTON ST. 7 WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 • 244-0880 
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1914 E. GRAND AVE. / LINDENHURST, IL 60046 • 356-3541 




THURSDAY 

1/15/87 



5:05 A.M. 
[HBO] - Courage The teenaged 
manager of a high school swim team 
must (ace his basic fear of the water. 

5:30 A.M. 
[HBO] - Iff No Crush, I'm In Love A 
high school girt falls in tove with her 
new teacher who looks just like her 
favorite soap opera star. (60 min.) 

2:30 P.M. 

CD - Sister Adrian, the Mother Ter- 
esa of Scran Ion Sister Adrian Barrett 
champions the causes of Scranton's 
poor and elderly. 

[HBO] - Courage The teenaged 
manager of a high school swim team 
must face his basic fear of the water. 

3:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - It's No Crush, I'm in Love A 
high school girl falls in love with her 
new teacher who looks just like her 
favorite soap opera star. (60 min.) 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
from Super Bowl X with the Pitts- 
burgh Steelers and the Dallas Cow- 
boys. 

2:15 A.M. 
[HBO] - Flashback: The Hinden- 
burg... Ship of Doom Relive the 
chilling experience aboard the fated 
zeppelin and examine the mysterious 
explosion at Lakehurst, New Jersey 
in 1937 in this haunting documen- 
tary. 

FRIDAY 
1/16/87 

9:30 A.M. 
CD - Torvil and Dean Gala (70 min.) 

10:00 A.M. 
[H BO] - Humor and the Presidency 
No president, living or dead, Demo- 
crat or Republican, is sale from this 
panel ol White House experts includ- 
ing Chevy Chase, Robert Klein, Art 
Buchwatd, Pat Paulsen, and more. 
(60 min.) 

10:40 A.M, 
CD - Gemma, Girts and Gershwin 

1:00 P.M. 
CD - Snap of Tap and the Razzma- 
tazz of Jazz 

[H BO] - Phil Collins: No Jacket Re- 
quired Phil Collins performs hits 
from his 'No Jacket Required' album 
before a sold-out audience. (60 min.) 
In Stereo. 

6:00 P.M. 
03 - And Baby Makes Two An ex- 
amination of teenage pregnancy and 
the innovative school district pro- 
grams designed to help a mother 
support herself and child. 

7:00 P.M. 
© - Garfield In Paradise Gar- 
field the lat cat joins his owner Jon 
for a wild tropical vacation that in- 
cludes rock n" rolling natives and a 
rumbling volcano. (R). 

7:30 P.M. 
O O - Snoopy's Getting Married, 
Charlie Brown Snoopy heads for ma- 
trimony when he falls head-over-tail 
for a French poodle. (R). 

12:30 A.M. 

CD - Blueberry Hill Fats Domino 
sings "Ain't That a Shame," "I'm 
Ready," "Whole Lotta Loving." "I'm 
In Love Again," "Walking to New Or- 
leans," "Blueberry Hill" and more in 
this 1985 concert. (60 min.) 

SATURDAY 
1/17/87 

7:00 A.M. 
(D - Rockin' & Rollin' With Phil 
Spector (60 min.) 

12:00 P.M. 
- Legacy of a Dream James Earl 
Jones narrates this documentary 



which highlights the life of Dr. Martin 
Luther King Jr. 

12:30 P.M. 
O - Gladiators of Ice 

2:00 P.M. 
© - Wonderful World of Disney: 
The Swamp Fox The nephew of Gen. 
Francis Marion (the Swamp Fox) 
uses his Job as a governor's emissary 
to spy for the Revolutionary War pa- 
triots. (60 min.) 

6:00 P.M. 
- American Promise: Dreams on 
Hold John Chancellor hosts a docu- 
mentary focusing on the widening 
gap between the rich and the poor, 
and the shrinking middle class in 
America. 
Q - Black Ministers 

9:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - Don Johnson: The Making 
of Heartbeat Follow Don through the 
making of his first album, including 
interviews and guest performances 
by Bonnie Raitt. Ron Wood and 
Whoopi Goldberg. (60 min.) In 
Stereo. 

10:30 P.M. 
O - 19th Annual NAACP Im- 
age Awards Stevie Wonder, Whoopi 
Goldberg and Paul Simon are among 
the presenters appearing on the an- 
nual awards presentation. (90 min.) 
CD - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson. Dennis James. 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. 
(90 min.) 

03 - National Nutrition Quiz An ex- 
ploration ol the facts and fantasies 
about nutrition hosted by Jane Brody 
and Dr. David Watts. (60 min.) 

10:45 P.M. 



SUNDAY 
1/18/87 



- Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault. 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (2 
hrs.) 

12:00 A.M. 

CD - telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James. 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter. Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (9 
hrs.) Continued. 

12:45 A.M. 
- Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton. John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (2 
hrs.) Continued. 

2:45 A.M. 
- Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (2 
hrs.) Continued. 

4:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (2 
hrs.) Continued. 



O - Spitting Image: The Ronnie 
and Nancy Show Nancy arranges for 
a surprise party for the president at 
the White House in this English spoof 
of American politics using life-size 
puppets. 

1:10 A.M. 
[HBO] - On Location: Robert Klein 
on Broadway Klein performs his 
unique free-form comedic style In his 
first one-man Broadway show. (65 
min.) In Slereo. 

MONDAY 

1/19/87 

5:35 A.M. 
[HBO] - Safe Harbor A young 
man's obsessive fear of nuclear an- 
nihilation bars him from the nor- 
malcy of life, — 

10:30 A.M. 
GD - Dancln' Man Ann Reinking, star 
of "All That Jazz." Joins "A Chorus 
Line" star Jeff Hyslop for an hour of 
high-stepping entertainment (60 
min.) 

3:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - Safe Harbor A young 
man's obsessive fear of nuclear an- 
nihilation bars him from the nor- 
malcy of life. 



6:05 A.M. 
[HBO] - Survival Series Bob Ne- 
whart hosts this indepth look at the 
various species of animals that inha- 
bit our planet. 

6:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James. 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. {3 
hrs.) Continued. 

9:00 A.M. 
CD - Telethon (4 hrs.) 
[HBO] - Flashback: The Hinden- 
burg... Ship of Doom Relive the chill- 
ing experience aboard the fated zep- 
pelin and examine the mysterious 
explosion at Lakehurst, New Jersey 
in 1937 in this haunting documen- 
tary. 

9:45 A.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A lund-ralser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault. 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (3 
hrs.) Continued. 

12:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (2 
hrs.) Continued. 

1:00 P.M. 
CD - Telethon (5 hrs.) Continued. 
03 - Telethon: Lives in Crisis (3 
hrs.) 

2:00 P.M. 

05 - Chinese (60 min.) 

2:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A fund-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage Irom New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritler, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. (3 
hrs.) Continued, 

4:00 P.M. 
03 - Telethon: Lives in Crisis (3 
hrs.) Continued. 

5:00 P.M. 
- Medical Marvels (60 min.) 

5:45 P.M. 
O - Telethon: Weekend with the 
Stars A (und-raiser benefiting victims 
of cerebral palsy featuring national 
coverage from New York and Los An- 
geles with hosts Nancy Dussault, 
Florence Henderson, Dennis James, 
Wayne Newton, John Ritter, Nancy 
Morgan Ritter and Henry Winkler. 
Continued. 

6:00 P.M. 
CD -Telethon: Seven Hundred Club 
(4 hrs.) 

7:00 P.M. 
- Heart of America (60 min.) 
€0 - Telethon: Lives in Crisis (2 
hrs.) Continued. 

8:00 P.M. ' 
© - Wonderful World of Disney 
(60 min.) 

9:00 P.M. 
63 - Telethon: Lives in Crisis (2 
hrs.) Continued. 

10:00 P.M. 
CD - Telethon: Seven Hundred Club 
• (2 hrs,) Continued. 

10:30 P.M. 



3:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - When We First Met This 
modern-day Romeo and Juliet tale 
features two teen-agers who fall in 
love and are separated, only to be 
reunited later through tragedy. (60 
min.) 

8:30 P.M. 

© - The Boy King (60 min.) 
[HBO] - Humor and the Presidency 
No president, living or dead, Demo- 
crat or Republican, is safe from this 
panel of White House experts includ- 
ing Chevy Chase, Robert Klein, Art 
Buchwald, Pat Paulsen, and more. 
(60 min.) 

TUESDAY 
1/20/87 

2:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - Courage" The teenaged 
manager of a high school swim team 
must face his basic fear of the water. 

7:00 P.M. 
CD - World of Audubon Specials: 
Galapagos islands (60 min.) 

8:00 P.M. 
(D - ACE Awards Live coverage of 
the Awards for Cable Excellence. (2 
hrs.) 

9:00 P.M. 



0- Unsolved Mysteries Ray- 
mond Burr hosts a took at four real- 
life mysteries; (60 min.) 
CD - Grey lord John Callaway hosts a 
discussion on the effects of 'Opera- 
tion Greytord' investigation on the 
court system In Chicago. (60 min.) 

9:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - Don Johnson: The Making 
of Heartbeat Follow Don through the 
making of his first album, including 
interviews and guest performances 
by Bonnie Raitt, Ron Wood and 
Whoopi Goldberg. (60 min,) tn 
Stereo. 

WEDNESDAY 
1/21/87 

9:30 A.M. 

0D - New Year's Eve Special (3 
hrs.) 

2:00 P.M. 

CD - Grey lord John Callaway hosts a 
discussion on the effects of 'Opera- 
tion Greylord" Investigation on the 
court system In Chicago. (60 min.) 

4:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - ft's No Crush, I'm in Love A 
high school girl falls in love with her 
new teacher who looks just like her 
favorite soap opera star. (60 min.) 




THURSDAY 
1/15/87 



7:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

8:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Tennis: Young Masters 
Championship From Stuttgart, West 
Germany. (60 min.) (R). 

9:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - 1986 Ektelon National 
Racquetball Championships Cover- 
age from Anaheim, CA. (60 min.) 
(R). 

10:00 A.M. 

[ESPN] - Action Outdoors with Ju- 
lius Boros 

10:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

11:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Ocean Sprays Bodies In 
Motion 

12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] -College Basketball: North 
Carolina at Virginia (2 hrs.) (R). 

2:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mark Sosin's Salt Water 
Journal 

2:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Tom Mann Outdoors 

3:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Rollermania (60 min.) 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Inside the' PGA Tour 

4:40 P.M. 
03 - Today's Racing Horse Racing 
Coverage. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Kan- 
sas at Oklahoma (2 hrs.) Live. 

6:30 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Atlanta Hawks (2 hrs.. 30 
min.) 

8:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Wake 
Forest at North Carolina State (2 
hrs.) Live. 

10:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - Inside the NFL Highlights 
of the NFL games, including com- 
mentary by Len Dawson and Nick 
Buoniconti. (60 min.) tn Stereo. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunder: The Final Four Live. 

10:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

11:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Presents 

11:30 P.M. 

[ESPN] -Volleyball: Tournament of 
Champions From Santa Barbara, Cal- 
ifornia. (60 min,) (R). 

1:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

2:00 A.M. 

[ESPN] - Top Rank Boxing from 
Las Vegas, NV (2 hrs., 30 min.) (R). 

4:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Footlocker Fitness Chal- 
lenge Coverage from Sunny Isles, FL. 
(R). 



FRIDAY 
1/16/87 



7:30 A.M. 

[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
8:00 A.M. 

[ESPN] - Tennis: Young Masters 
Championship From Stuttgart, West 
Germany. (2 hrs.) (R). 

10:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Speedweek 

10:30 A.M. 



[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

11:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Ocean Sprays Bodies (n 
Motion 

12:00 P.M, 
[ESPN] -College Basketball: Kan- 
sas at Oklahoma (2 hrs,) (R). 

2:00 P.M. 

[ESPN] -College Basketball: Wake 
Forest at North Carolina State (2 
hrs.) (R). 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPNJ - NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl Xt with the Oakland 
Raiders and the Minnesota Vikings. 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Presents 

4:40 P.M. 
63 - Today's Racing Horse Racing 
Coverage. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Speedweek 
6:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - Inside the NFL Highlights 
of the NFL games, Including com- 
mentary by Len Dawson and Nick 
Buoniconti. (60 min.) In Stereo. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Kfckboxlng (90 min.) 
Live. 

7:05 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Houston 
Rockets at Detroit Pistons (2 hrs.. 
1 5 min.) Live. 

8:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] -Top Rank Boxing from At- 
lantic City, NJ (2 hrs.) Live. 

10:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunden The Final Four (4 hrs.) 
Live. 

12:40 A.M. 
- This Is the NFL 

12:45 A.M. 
[HBO] - Inside the NFL Highlights 
of the NFL games, including com- 
mentary by Len Dawson and Nick 
Buoniconti. (60 min.) In Stereo. 

2:00 A.M. 

[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
2:30 A.M. 

[ESPN] - Rolex/Jackle Stewart 
Pro-Celebrity Trap Shoot Coverage 
from London, England. (R), 

3:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Plymouth/Xerox Corpor- 
ate Sports Battle Coverage from Or- 
lando, FL. (2 hrs.) (R). 

SATURDAY 
1/17/87 

5:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - 1986 Double Brown Iron 
Man Triathlon Championship Cover- 
age from New Zealand. (60 min.) 
(R). 

6:00 A.M. 

£0 - Esta Semana en Beisbol (60 

min.) 

[ESPN] - Auto Racing Michelle 

Mouton explains Rally Racing. 

6:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

7:00 A.M. 
CD - Championship Wrestling (60 
min.) 

[ESPN] - Speedweek 

7:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Jimmy Ballard Golf Con- 
nection 

8:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Inside the PGA Tour 

8:30 A.M. 
CD - Motorweek 

[ESPN] - Action Outdoors with Ju- 
lius Boros 

9:00 A.M. 



[HBO] - Inside the NFL Highlights 
of the NFL games, including com- 
mentary by Len Dawson and Nick 
Buoniconti. (60 min.) In Stereo. 
[ESPN] -Bowling: 1986 High Roll- 
er* Tournament Coverage from Las 
Vegas, NV. (60 min.) (R). 
9:30 AM. 

CD - Motorweek 

10:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mark Sosin's Salt Water 
Journal 

10:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] -Tom Mann Outdoors 

11:00 A.M. 
€S - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
(60 min.) 

€0 - German Professional Soccer 
(60 min.) 
[ESPN] - Sportscenter Saturday 

11:30 AM, 
[ESPN] -Top Rank Boxing from At- 
lantic City, NJ (90 min.) 

12:00 P.M. 
- 1986 Alt Pro Team (60 min.) 
CD - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
(60 min.) 

12:30P.M. 

- This Is the NFL 

1:00 P.M. 
0- College Basketball: Vlllan- 
ova at Virginia (2 hrs.) Live. 
CD- Babe Winkleman's Good Fish- 
ing 

[ESPN] - Steve Garvey Tennis 
Classic From Newport Beach, CA. 
(60 min.) 

1:30 P.M. 
- College Basketball: Games to 
be Announced Games featured In 
this time period are Miami at Kansas, 
Arkansas at Houston and Bradley at 
UAB. (2 hrs.) Live. 

2:00 P.M. 
O CD - Pro Bowlers Tour AC 
Delco Classic Coverage of the 
$150,000 PBA event is featured 
from Union City. CA. (90.mln.) Live. 
[ESPN] - 1987 Budwelser Truck 
and Tractor Pull Championships 
From New Orleans, LA. (60 min.) 

3:00 P.M. 
- College Basketball: West 
Virginia at Notre Dame or UNLV at 
Oklahoma (2 hrs.) Live. , 
[ESPN] - Flshin' Hole (60 min.) 

3:30 P.M. 
- Golf: Bob Hope Chrysler Clas- 
sic (2 hrs.) Live. 

O CD - Wide World of Sports The 
Ironman Triathlon World Champion- 
ship is featured from Kona, Hawaii. 
(90 min.) 

3:35 P.M. 
CD - Saltwater Angler with Rip Pal- 
lot 

4:00 P.M. 
CD - German Professional Soccer 
(60 min.) 

[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl XII with the Dallas Cow- 
boys and the Denver Broncos, 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl XIII with the Pints- 
burgh Steelers and the Dallas Cow- 
boys. 

4:35 P.M. 
CD - Fishfn' With Orlando Wilson 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Speedweek 

5:05 P.M. 
CD- World Championship Wrestling 
(2 hrs.) 

5:30 P.M. 
83 - Midwest Outdoors Limited 
[ESPN] - Scholastic Sports Amer- 
ica 

6:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Sportscenter Saturday 




4C Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1987 



^•p^MtWi'lt >»**• ■■•- 



+^*M^mtm *J >* HitW^ift'li • 



i in 1 1 umiiftiiKnntii 



m^ 



Wedding Traditions Are Blend Of Old And New 



Today, more than ever, 
traditions are what wed- 
dings are made of. Yet, in 
the 1980s, tradition takes on 
a whole new meaning. Not 
only is it a sense of retaining 
the customs of the past, but 
also one of incorporating the 



values and ideals of the 
present, thus blending 
traditions in the making with 
traditions of old. 

Though the days are past 
when Early American 
newlyweds drank a brew of 
sack posset and hot spiced 




The Classic Cake 

It's eosy to create a traditional tiered wedding cake 
with Wilton pans, separator plates, columns and wed- 
ding ornaments. 



milk to give them energy for 
the night ahead, also gone 
are the wedding ceremonies 
of the 1960s and '70s when the 
time-honored customs and 
values were tossed to the 
wind. 

Young couples of the '80s 
have found a comfortable 
place somewhere in bet- 
ween. While keeping what 
they find best and most 
beautiful of past traditions, 
they add to their weddings 
personal touches that ex- 
press their individuality. 

For example, today many 
brides have both father and 
mother walk them down the 
aisle so that both parents 
may enjoy the pleasure and 
the privelege of "giving 
away" their daughter. 

Other changes in the 
typical "old-fashioned"we- 
dding include changing 
ritual phrases such as "love, 
honor and obey" and "man 
and wife" so as to be more in 
keeping with today's ideal of 
equality. 

Carat Weight 

A diamond is measured in 
carats, and there are 100 
points In a carat, like cents 
in a dollar. A carat is equal 
to one-quarter of a gram and 
there are 142 carats to the 
ounce. The larger the 
diamond, the scarcer it is 
and the higher the value per 
carat but, remember that 
size alone does not deter- 
mine value. Cut, color and 
clarity must also be taken in- 
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top-color, flawless half-carat 
diamond will be worth more - 
than a warmer color, flawed 
one-carat stone. 



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In present-day 

ceremonies, one will more 
often hear "love, honor and 
cherish" or "husband and 
wife." 

Today's ideas of equality 
are also bringing the groom 
more into the limelight. 
Until recently, all eyes were 
focused on the bride on her 
"big day" with the groom 
himself often feeling like a 
spectator. 

Today's groom, however, 
is taking on all sorts of new 
responsibilities such as 
helping to pick the wedding 
site, choosing china pat- 
terns, addressing in- 
vitations, and writing thank- 
you notes. Some men even 



wear engagement rings and 
have showers thrown in their 
honor. 

The quesiton of who pays 
for the wedding has also 
been affected by the present 
day attitude towards 
equality. 

Traditionally, the bride's 
parents took on most of the 
expense, but now there is a 
definite trend towards the 
groom's family sharing a 
larger portion of the bill. 

Though some of. this 
chipping in reflects the 
economy, it i.s also a sign of 
our times. We no longer 
consider the bride's parents 
lo be "marrying off" their 
daughter. Instead, the 



wedding is seen as a 
celebration .of the joining 
together of two people. 

With fewer of the old- 
fashioned "rules" of 
etiquette applying to today's 
weddings, creative additions 
to make the occasion unique 
are unlimited. 

They range from sub- 
stituting carrot cake for the 
traditioniaj white sponge 
cake, to honoring the bride 
or groom's heritage by 
serving slices of Italian 
cheesecake or Irish fruit- 
cake. 

Music may be as unique as 
having bagpipes play as the 
newly-married couple leave, 
the altar. 







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Brides Are Beautiful But They Need Help 



4 



i 







The hall's been reserved, 
the flowers ordered, gowns 
fitted and limos rented. The 
last thing to do is make an 
appointment to have hair 
and makeup done on the 
nmorning of the wedding. 
Right? 

"Wrong!" says New York 
hair stylist Charles 
Nicholas. "The biggest 
mistake a bride can make is 
to wait until the last minute 
to decide on her wedding day 
hairdo and then end up with 
a style radically different 
from her every day look. 

For instance, if a girl has 
straight bangs and hair all 
one length, she shouldn't 
suddenly have a mass of 
curls on her wedding day. 
People won't recognize her. 
It's more important to be 
oneself rather than an acress 
wearing a wedding gown." 

No matter what the style, 
a head of beautiful, healthy 
hair is essential, but that 
lakes time. "Two months 
before the wedding, I would 
start to get my hair in 
shape," advises Nicholas, 
who has styled American 
and European brides for 
over 20 years. 

"The first step is to select 
a particularly good shampoo 
and conditioner system. 
Then arrange a consultation 
with a hairdresser, have one 
or two cuts by this person so 
that both of you can gauge 
exactly when your last cut 
should be. Notice how soon 
after a perm, chemical 
straightening or cut hair is 
best, then time the final visit 
accordingly." 

The veil is an important 
factor when choosing a wed- 
ding day hairstyle. "The 
hair should never interrupt 



the delicate flow of the veil,' 
says Nicholas. "Also im- 
portant is the height of the 
groom. We don't want a hair- 
style and headpiece that 
makes the bride taller tahn 
the groom." 

To prevent a veil or head- 
piece from falling out of 
place, try this trick from 
Nicholas: Make an old- 
fashioned pincuil with a 
small lock of hair where the 
ornament is going to be at- 
tached. 

Cross two hairpins to hold 
the curl in place, Then tuck 
the veil or headpiece's sup- 
portive comb inside the curl 
which acts as an anchor. 

It'll support the headpiece 
throughout the day, leaving 
the bride free to dance the 
night away! 

Besides getting one's hair 
in shape, one will want to get 
skin in excellent condition, 
especially for all of those 
wedding photos. 

There are a number of 
ways to deep cleanse for a 
healthy, clear complexion: a 
beauty scrub, masque or a 
steamed towel will do the 
trick. 

Select a scrub or masque 
formulation that is right for 
a particular skin type. If 
using a steamed towel, spray 
it lightly with a favorite 
scent for added luxury while 
relaxing for 15-20 minutes. 

Follow with a toner and 
moisturizer suited to the 
skin's particular needs. 

For the wedding day, 
choose and apply makeup 
with extra care. Try for the 
overall effect of a romantic, 
sculpted look-high cheek- 
bones against softly 
hollowed cheeks and full, 




Photo Treasures 

The shy, hesitant look of the bride on her wedding day 
can be caught in a photograph because the 
professional photographer knows through experience 
when to look for such expressions. 

Pearls Perfect 
Bridal Jewelry 



That magical moment- 
when all eyes gaze upon the 
bride as she seems to float 
down the aisle, is perhaps 
the most dreamt-aboiit 
moment in a woman's life. 

Throughout the ages, the 
image of the bride has been 
of a woman glorified, and 
her wedding day an occasion 
when her beauty appears 
transcendent. 

A strand of glowing, 
cultured pearls lends an air 
of enchantment to any bridal 
look, their sort, pure beauty 
a natural complement to 
smooth satin and delicate 
lace. 

The luminous pearl has 
cast its spell for centuries as 
a woman's most precious 
adornment, its unearthly 
beauty ever apparent in the 



magical myths of the an- 
cients. 

The goddess of beauty and 
love, Aphrodite, was 
believed by the Greeks to 
have been born like a pearl 
from a shell carried ashore 
by the sea. 

Roman myth tells that 
Venus, goddess of love, was 
born in similarly mystical 
fashion. And, according to 
the Roman historian, 
Suetonius, Julius Caesar in- 
vaded Britain so that he 
might capture a treasure of 
pearls. Later, he was to 
present a breast plate, set 
with pink pearls from the 
Conway River in Wales, to 
the goddess Venus Genetrix 
in her Roman temple. 

Royal women have ever 
sought to enhance their 
beauty with the creamy 
richness of cultured pearls. 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 



sensuous lips. 

Choose a base that is 
slightly lighter than one's 
skin tone as perspiration and 
oilswill cause it to darken as 
the wedding day goes on, and 
always blend into the 
hairline and onto the neck. 

Next, use a darker blush 
for shadowing and a lighter 
color high on the cheeks to 
bring out and brighten the 
eyes, the expressive focal 
point of the face, especially 
for photography. Avoid har- 
sh or vivid colors on the wed- 
ding day. 

Choose eyeshadow, lip- 
stick and blush shades of 
purple and pink for a softer, 
prettier effect. One can 
make eyes look more 
dramatic simply by adding a 
little fullness, arch or length 
to the eyebrow with a thin 
brush. 

A light dusting of loose 
powder over the entire face 
will provide an even matte 
look that will eliminate 
shininess in photographs. 
Lastly, pat the face very 
lightly with a dampened 
sponge or cotton ball- 
makeup will look more 
natural and stay fresh 



longer. 

For the silky feminine han- 
ds wanted to show off the 
beautiful new ring, treat 
oneself to a relaxing 
manicure, starting with a 
rich, creamy hand and body 
lotion. 



One final but most im- 
portant tip: The excitement 
and anticipation of the day's 
festivities may cause one to 
perspire more heavily-so 
don't forget to use a feminine 
yet strong deodorant and an- 
tiperspirant. Try one for- 
mulated especially for 
today's woman. 

A well-planned beauty 
routine will give one the con- 
fidence and radiance needed 
to enjoy the big day-relxed, 
prepared and looking 
beautiful. 



Weddings 

For All Ages 

If you believe that you are 
too old to be married, think 
again. The oldest 
bridegroom in history, so far 
as is known, was Ralph Cam- 
bridge, who was 105 when he 
married his 70-year-old wife 
in South Africa in 1971. 




;.:'../.->.; 



Simple And Elegant 

Cultured pearl jewelry enhances bridal attire. From 
the Cultured Pearl Assn. of America and Japan, the 
beautiful choker necklace consists of 6mm perfectly 
matched gems. Paired with the cultured pearl stua 
earrings, the jewelry adds a classic finishing touch to 
the scallop edged open neck gown and headpiece. 



Keep Reception Schedule Flexible 



byMAKKBENNO 

Karen Dempsey. banquet 
manager at the Country 
Squire restaurant in 
Grayslake, stresses one 
important point about 
planning the reception for a 
wedding: "time is 
valuable." 

Dempsey has handled 
many banquets tor the 
Country Squire, and her 
experience in the field may 
prove helpful in the search 
for a reception facility. 

One of the most important 
things to keep in mind, says 
Dempsey. is the coor- 
dination of the wedding 
ceremony and reception. 
Rather than narrowing down 
possible dates lor both the 
ceremony and reception, one 
should allow at least a month 
lor unanticipated changes. 

Dempsey says that it's 
common lor people to 
arrange a date with a church 



only to find that the desired 
banquet hall has no 
openings. It makes things 
much easier when a person 
can ask for a certain month 
instead of only one par- 
ticular day. 

Another detail prospective 
couples must decide upon is 
an accurate guest list. 
Dempsey says that when 
people call 'with a proposed 
guest list of 100-200 people, 
there's no way to help them. 
She believes a list with a 
possible error of only 25 is 
necessary to arrange a 
banquet hall. 

The menu and prices must 
also be quickly established. 
It is n waste of time to 
consider a menu that is loo 
expensive or limited to 
properly supply the 
reception party. 

Many banquet halls, such 
as the Country Squire, 
conduct both the wedding 



ceremony and reception on 
their premises. During the 
summer weddings are often 
held outside, and in colder 
months indoors. Having both 
the ceremony and reception 
at the same facility could 
make the planning run more 
smoothly. 

Most banquet halts which 
furnish wedding receptions 
are booked about a year in 
advance. Summer, spring, 
and fall weddings tend to 
have longer waiting lists, 
while winter weddings arc 
generally easier to ac- 
commodate. This fact should 
be considered when planning 
lor a wedding. 

Dempsey says, however, 
that people planning a 
wedding in less than 10 
months lime should nol give 
up. Even though some places 
are booked, a person should 
still call to make sure, since 
cancellations are ulwavs a 



possibility. It is also easier to 
book a hall on short notice 
when the proposed guest list 
is relatively small. 

According to Dempsey. 
one valuable tip concerns 
tentative reservations. She 
says that there's a lot of 
people who call to inquire 
about a date but don't ac- 
tually reserve it. When one is 
serious about a certain hall, 
she suggests making ten- , 
tative reservations on an 
open date. Contact the hall 
within a week alter making 
these reservations to finalize ■ 
plans. 

Harmony 

Marriage the happiest bond 

of love might be, 
If hands were only joined 

when hearts agree. 

George Granville, 
Baron Landsowne 



\ 






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Sculpted From Heaven 

Sculpted from butter-soft silk satin is the Prisdlla por- tering wasp waist. Full skirt sweeps to a chapel train, 

trait look. A ruff led stand-up collar framed I with abric Band f fabrjc roseHes with fj ng ertlp-length pearl- 
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enough sleeves. The molded bodice snugs Into a flat- strewn illusion completes the ma|esty. 



Lakeland Newspapers 3D 



Choosing Right Gown Not Easiest Of Tasks 



Why does a woman go 
through such trouble to find 
the perfect wedding go\vn& 
After all. it's a dress she'l! 



wear only once. But that 
"once/' reminds iirltir'* 
magazine, is one of the most 
important days in her life 




// mi 

18th Cen fury Gown 

White satin wedding gown of the 18th century, worn 
by socialite Mrs. St. Clair, was trimmed with lace in 
festooned flounces and edged with silver gimp as was 
in fashion. 



and she'll want to look her 
loveliest. 

These tips to help the 
bride-to-be sort through the 
possibilities and find a dress 
that's right for her are of- 
fered in a recent issue of 

ttrhh'n'. 

-Narrow the choice before 
actually setting foot in the 
store. First, ask oneself how 
formal the wedding will be 
and rule out any dresses that 
don't match in style. 

One way to tell whether a 
dress is formal is by the 
fabric. For example, 
gossamer chiffon might be 
appropriate for a dinner 
dance reception while cotton 
eyelet is pretty at an af- 
ternoon garden reception. 

Other clues: a lot of lace or 
pearls and a long train is 
formal, while a simpler 
design and very short train 
is less so. 

Next, consider how much 
one can spend. The average 
hriilf'f reader spends about 
$350 on her dress, but the 
range of possible prices is 
from under $100 to $7,000 and 
up. 

Don't worry that a 
somewhat tight budget will 
keep you from wearing a 
favorite style. Classic 
designs tend to show up in 
every price range. 

Finally, consider the 
actual specifics of style: 
neckline, waistline, sleeve 
shape and length, and color, 
(There's white, ivory and 
new pastels such as soft 
pink, peach, and aqua, alone 
or combined with white. ) 

Is there a combination of 
these fashion points that 
catches the eye every time? 
Then this is the basic style to 



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look for. 

-Start to actually shop at 
least six months before the 
wedding. Most wedding 
dresses are special-ordered 
and take a couple of months 
between order and delivery. 
And time will be needed for 
alterations. 

To avoid confusing 
opinions, shop alone, or take 
just one other person along 
whose taste is trusted. This 
could be a mother, sister, 
best friend or even fiance. 

Plan ahead, then shop 
prepared. Wear the right 
underclothes, such as a good 
bra and long slip. Take along 
shoes with heels in the height 
that will be worn on the 



wedding day.) 

-When finding the dress, 
be sure the store consultant 
-takes dow ( n all one's 
measuremenits. Also make 
sure she includes the date 
the dress is needed on the 
sales slip. This could be up to 
a full month before the 
wedding if one wants to wear 
it for the bridal portrait in 
the newspaper. 

Ask how long it should take 
for the ordeir to be filled, and 
if nothing is heard from the 
store by then, give them a 
call. Mix-ups arc very rare, 
but it's safest not to take a 
chance. 

-Once the- store does notify 
that the dress is in, make an 



appointment for a fitting 
right away. Again, bring the 
right shoes and un- 
dergarments. 

Take time and check the 
fit of the dress in a mirror 
that lets one see from all 
angles. Here's what to look 
for: Is the hem just right, or 
is there a chance of tripping 
on it? 



Flawless Diamonds 

The term flawless refers to 
a diamond that has no in- 
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10-power magnification. 
There are very few flawless 
diamonds, therefore such 
diamonds are expensive, 




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4D Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 967 



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Some Brides Would Do It Differently 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

No matter how many 
books on "How To Plan Your 
Wedding." a bride may 
read, and no matter how 
carefutly she follows 
everyone's advice, most 
brides would do some things 



a little differently if they had 
their "druthers." 

Mrs. Larry Schiltz of Lin- 
denhurst, who has been 
married for a little over a 
year, said, "I think I would 
make sure that the cocktail 
hour before the dinner was 



just that, an hour. 

Because the wedding 
ceremony was over at 3 p.m. 
.and the dinner was not set 
until 6 p.m., many out of 
town guests went straight to 
the reception and started 
celebrating so early that it 



Weddings Need Timetable 



Ready for the countdown? 
The following gives one a 
general time schedule for 
the many things one has to 
do for a wonderful wedding, 
a memorable reception. 
Six months before: 

Discuss wedding budget 
with parents; if sharing ex- 
penses, include fiance and 
his parents. 



weeks for printing.) 

Start addressing on 
receipt. 

Plan wedding cake. 

Order attendants' dresses, 
confirm delivery of bride's. 

Select portrait 

photographer and 

videographer. 

Plan to see gynecologist. 

Plan ceremony, reception 



Select wedding and recep- details with organist, florist, 



number of 



discuss 
rcser- 



tion sites. 

Determine 
guests. 

Sec clergyman or judge 
with fiance. 

Talk to caterer, 
reception, make 
vat ions. 

Plan do-it-yourself recep- 
tion menu, if not using 
caterer. 

Order dress , accessories . 

Begin guest list, choose at- 
tendants. 

Register for china, silver, 
etc. . 

Discuss honeymoon plans. 

Plan new home, shop for 
it. 

Groom orders rings. 

Choose ushers, one for 
every 50 guests. 

Three months 
before: 

Complete guest list. 

Order invitations and an- 
nouncements (allow four 



etc. 

Finalize decision on 
caterer. 

Groom orders wedding at- 
tire, checks attendants' at- 
tire. * 

Completes honeymoon 
plans, buys tickets, updates 
passports. 
One month before: 

Buy groom's, attendants' 
gifts. 

Mail invitations. 

Order groom's ring. 

Arrange lodging for out-of- 
town guests. 

Plan maids' luncheon, 
rehearsal dinner. 

Write thank-you notes for 
gifts. 

Arrange newspaper an-' 
nouncement. 

Decide on contents of bar 
with fiance. 

Groom helps., decide 
bride's bouquet, going away 
corsage, boutonnicres. 



mothers" corsages. 

Selects gift for bride, his 
attendants. 

Makes sure marriage 
documents are in order. 
Two weeks before: 

Go with fiance for 
marriage license. 

Arrange to get attendants 
to church. 

Purchase bar needs, 
arrange delivery. 

Check on final details with 
florist, musician, 

photographer. 

Make appointment with 
hairdresser. 

Send announcement to 
newspapers. 

Groom checks on 
arrangements for bachelor 
dinner. 

Double-check honeymoon 
reservations. 

One Week Before: 

Reconfirm party helpers 
with service. 

Begin honeymoon 
packing. 
.If using caterer, give final 
guest number. 

Give and/or attend maids' 
luncheon. 

Groom presents gifts to at- 
tendants. 

Explain seating to head 
usher. 

. Give clergyman's fees to 
best man. 



ruined the dinner for some." 
Laura Marino, a Wiscon- 
sin bride, said that she would 
be more careful about 
looking at the church 
beforehand. 

"The minister told us that 
there would be no altar to put 
flowers on and that the pew 
decorations and candles 
should be enough to decorate 
the church," she said. 

"When we arrived at the 
church there was a tem- 
porary altar set up that held 
only two candles and looked 
very bare. Thank goodness 
someone had sent me 
several dozens of roses 
which were in vases at our 



new home. A quick 
gathering up of these put two 
giant vases of roses on the 
altar." 

Mrs. John Drew of Antioch 
Twp., a summer 1986 bride, 
said, "I would be more 
careful and investigate the 
place where I rented the 
tuxedoes. The ones we got 
were ill-fitting and cheap 
looking, not at all like the 
smaples we saw. even 
though they cost over $60 
apiece to rent. 1 felt that the 
men would have looked bet- 
ter in nice suits." 

One bride said that she 
would use silk flowers for 
hers and her bridesmaid's 



bouquets instead of real ones 
if she were to do it again. 

"We used . white roses 
which didn't hold-up at all. I 
was in a girlfriend's wedding 
two weeks- later and I still 
have the silk bouquet I 
carried and it looks just as 
good as it did before the wed- 
ding." 

Joan Jason from just out- 
side of Wildwood. who was 
married for two years and is 
the process of getting a 

divorce said, "I certainly 
wouldn't spend the thousan- 
ds of dollars my parents did 
even if I were to married for 
the first time." 








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Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 5D 



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Thursday, JanuaiY 1 5, 1 9W 



6D lakeland Newspapore 



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Couples Decide On Rings First 



i 



The first major decision 
facing the newly-engaged 
couple is the selection of an 
engagement ring, usually 
shortly followed by a wed- 
ding ring. 

Jewelers of America (JA), 
the national association 
representing more than 
12,000 retail jewelers across 
the country, offers some lips 
that are designed to help a 
couple pick the rings that fit 
the future bride's finger and 
future groom's budget. 

According to National 
Jeweler, a trade publication, 
today's engaged couples 
continue the tradition of 
solitaire diamonds, but they 



are combining them with 
romantic contemporary 
settings. 

Hound stones still lead in 
popularity, but the use of 
"fancies" such as marquises 
and pears, followed by ovals 
and emerald-cut stones, is 
increasing. 

The bigger the stone, the 
simpler the setting should 
be. Conversely, the smaller 
the center stone, or solitaire, 
the more elaborate the 
setting can be. 

Some of the smaller fancy- 
shaped diamonds, in 
openwork freeform settings, 
give the illusion of a bigger 
stone, and a more important 



The Bride's Father 



As they stroll proudly 
down the aisle 

his mind races to earlier 
years, 

When she used to skin her 
knees 

and he wiped away her 
tears. 

Where did those tender 
days go? 

Is she ready for a new 
stage of life? 

And what about that 
cavalier young man, 
Is he ready for a wife? 

This time he'll give her up 
for good, 

not just a Saturday 
night. 

He hopes that all her needs 
are met 

and that this bond of love is 
right. 

There's so much that she'll 
have to learn 

when the ups and downs 
get rough. 



Like patience and 
forgiveness 

and he hopes she'll have 
enough. 

They're almost at the end 
of the aisle, 

it went by much too fast. 
He needed hours more 
than this 

to fondly remember the 
past. 

She's letting go of his arm 
now 

and the feeling tugs at this 
heart. 

But he knows that even a 
husband's love 

will never replace his 
part. 

He's done his best to let 
her grow 

and played the role of 
guide. 

She'll be his daughter 
forever 

so today she can be the 
bride. 



ring, while keeping the price 
levels down. 

All-yellow gold remains 
the favorite, but new finishes 
and color combinations are 
making fashion news. Two- 
tone textural treatments; . 
.combining mirror finishes 
with sand-blasted, floren- 
tincd, brushed and pebbled 
surfaces, arc all available. 

A new item: refined 
nugget designs, offering the 
rich coloration of gold with 
an irregular surface. 

Younger couples prefer 
romantic designs, featuring 
hand-cut flowers and leaves, 
continuous hearts, braided 
and love knot motifs. In- 
terlocking sets of 
engagement and wedding 
rings which can be worn 
separately or as a unit, look 
most appealing with softer, 
more flowing lines. 

Couples embarking on 
their second trip to the altar 
frequently eliminate the 
traditional engagement ring 
in favor of a more costly 
wedding ring, often em- 
bellished by diamonds. 

For this most important 
choice, it is vital to deal with 
a local jeweler who not only 
offers a wide selection of 
styles and price ranges, but 
is also an expert who can 
give advice and service. 

For example, if a ring or 
piece of jewelty belonged to 
a parent or grandparent, a 
jeweler can make it in to a 
"today" style for them. 

Finally, the jeweler who 
has become an advisor will 
also be around in the future 
for service. One can turn to 



him for repairs, or, as the 
years pass, one may want to 
hand the ring down to a 
newly-engaged child. This 
jeweler will be there to help. 



The Hallmark 

A law was passed in 14th 
century England whereby a 
silversmith was obliged to 
leave a mark on all his wares 
identifying them as made by 
him. His personal mark was 
assigned to him by the king. 
These marks were called 
hallmarks because all silver 
articles were assayed and 
marked at the London's 
Goldsmiths' Hall. 




Diamond Flush 

The diamond solitaire in every shape and size is the 
overwhelming favorite with 69 percent of brides who 
receive a diamond engagement ring. Clockwise from 
top, the oval diamond; the marquise diamond; the 
round diamond; the emerald-cut diamond. In the cen- 
ter is the heart-shaped diamond. 





For your 
priceless 
wedding 
dress... 

We have a very special service 
for the most treasured dress you'll 
ever own . . . (he gown you wore at 
your wedding. We clean It the 
Sanltone way, with special care and 
professional know-how. We do 
necessary mending & repairs. We 
meticulously press and fold It. 
Then we carefully wrap It and 
box it. Then box It again. 

As the years go by, 
you'll be so thankful that 
you trusted your wedding 
dress to us. Call us today 
about this special service. 



EXECUTIVE 



DRY CLEANING 

GRAND MILL PLAZA 
4949 W. GRAND AVE.. GURNEE 

662-6211 



'fflusuteteix 



406 N. SEYMOUR 

MUNDELEIN 

566-6364 



For That 
Perfect 
Wedding 



Call 



LaVerne's Catering Inc. 

CATERING BY KORY LTD. 
Fox Lake, 1L 
(312) 546-5700 OR (312) 587-9797 



Division Of Michael Industries 




V 

I 



ANTIOCH ■ ILLINOIS 



FOR THE FINEST 

SELECTION OF 

BRIDAL 

GOWNS... 

AND BRIDESMAID 

DRESSES. MAKE 

AN 

APPOINTMENT 

WITH NOREEN... 




1 • 



A 



"Continuous Fashion Show" 

Saturday, January 17th - 9 to 5 



924 Main Sf. 



(312)395-2190 



Lakeland Newspapers 7D 






Thursday, January 1 5, \ 987 



M SBl l lWIIIIW* 



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Debbie's Floral Of Mundelein 



and 



\ 



Lakeland Newspapers 
Proudly Present 





MM! 



MWeddi 



Wedding Expo 

Lakeland's Greatest Bridal Extravaganza Of The Year 

Sunday, Jan. 18 

Gurnee Holiday Inn 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 




wfffe/vice 




For Reserved Seating, Call Debbie's 
Floral For Tickets, (312) 949-4454. 
Tickets To Be Picked Up At Door 
Day Of Show. 

Exciting New Bridal Creations 
*Latest Formal Wear, Accessories 
* Entertainment 
*Free Wedding Consultations 
*Plenty Of Free Parking 

Prizes Galore — — 

Grand Prize - Wedding Expo '87 

CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES - 7 Day Cruise to the Caribbean or Mexico on board - 
any one of the "Fun Ships" — Festivale - Troplcale - Holiday -Jubilee - Celebra- 
tion. Free Cruise for one person - Category HA -based on double occupancy 
-Valued at $1 ,145.00. Upgrade to outside cabin if available. 

Grand Prize - Hawaiian Brunch 

AMERICAN AIRLINES - Two Round-trip Coach Tickets to anywhere in the 
Domestic U.S. Valued at approximately $700.00 per ticket. 
CAREFREE VACATIONS - 7 Day trip to Cancun or Jamaica including airfare and 
hotel accommodations for one person, based on double occupancy. Wedding 
Expo Raffle. 

Above Prizes Arranged Through Latest Travel Dimensions Ltd. 

251 E. Dundee Rd. 

Wheeling, IL 

Phone (312) 367-0267 

Doris Bjorklund, Travel Consultant 

Many More Prizes Too Numerous To Mention 

Unlimited Registration 




"Attention , 

Reserved seats still available 
for 3 p.m. show. Call (312) 
949-4454 for reservat» 



How To Reserve Brunch Tickets 



Call (312) 949-4454, Gurnee 
Holiday Inn, Attn: Sue 
Petersen, for the Fantastic 
Hawaiian Brunch, $12. Tax & 
tip included, includes glass 



of champagne. Specify 1 1 
a.m. or 1 p.m. serving. 
Resort fashions by Hawaii 
Shop Ltd., Evanston. 




Schedule Of Events 

10 a.m.— Doors Open, Register for free gifts 

10 a.m.— Exhibits open, reserved tickets not 
necessary 

10 a.m.-4 p.m.— Rooms 3 & 4, wedding 
seminars, free planning services 

11 a.m.— 1st Hawaiian Brunch/Resort Wear 
Fahlon Show, pool side, (Brunch* ticket required) 

1 p.m.— 1st Bridal/Formal Wear show, main 
banquet room; All seats reserved. 

1 p.m.-2nd Hawaiian Brunch/Resort Wear 
Fashion Show, pool side, (Brunch ticket 
required) 

2 p.m.— Lake St. Dancers, main banquet room, 
admission free 

2 p.m.— Award Hawaiian Brunch prizes, pool 
side, 

3 p.m.— 2nd Bridal/Formal Wear show, main 
banauet room; admission free, reserved seating 
available. 

4 pm.— Grand prize awards, main banquet 
room. 

5 p.m. --Show closes 

Note: Only charge will be *12 brunch optional. 



A 
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8D Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1987 









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The Best Way To Party 
Is With Some Bubbly 



The oldest symbol of love, 
unity and celebration is the 
raising of glasses for a warm 
toast to the happiness of the 
bride and groom. 

But, if sharing special 
moments with family and 
friends-intimate parlies and 
champagne occasions-are 
taking too big a bite out of 
the over-all wedding budget, 
eveyone can celebrate by 
popping the cork with an 
affordable alternative-im- 
ported sparkling wine. 

Wine has been associated 
with love since the early 
Roman times; therefore, 
there's no need to diminish 



the budget with expensively- 
priced champagnes. 

Champs D'Ore, a 
sparkling dry white wine 
from France, is a perfect 
alternative. It adds ex- 
citement to every occasion 
once the cork pops and the 
bubbles rise. 

To make wedding 
celebrations memorable, try 
these entertaining and 
serving suggestions from the 
sparkling wine experts at 
Victory Imports. 

Sparkling wine should be 
served in fluted or tulip 
shaped glasses. Air is the 
worst enemy of a sparkling 



wine's bubbles; the 
narrower the opening, the 
longer the bubbles will last. 

Saucer shaped glasses 
should be saved for still table 
wines. If used for sparkling 
wine, they cause the bubbles 
to dissipate rapidly because 
they expose so much of the 
wine to the air. 

Once poured, one can 
"dress up" the wine itself in 
the glass. P'reeze 
strawberries, cherries or 
blueberries in ice cubes 
made from orange, cran- 
berry or lime juice and place 
these in the wine. 



Simply Perfect 



Alluring netting and lace capture everyone's attention on this lovely bridal gown of 
reembroidered Alencon lace ona* organza with cathedral train arid complementing 
veil by Michele Piccione of Alfred Angela. 




FOR THE BRIDE TO BE 

Your One-Stop 

Wedding Shop 

Invitations 
Accessories 
Bridal Books 
Reception Items 

Jackie's Hallmark 

928 Main St. 
Antioch, IL 60002 

(312)395-1555 




^> octet 4 "Pcfifawup 

Caterers of Quality Cuisine Since 1960 

,<$& tM %, Main Office: 




/ 



•iiC* % 



^ 





V 904 S'. Milwaukee Ave. 
\ Libertyville, Illinois 

(312) 362-6630 
'*Wm W 6 ^ Catering Office: 

712 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, Illinois 

(312) 362-4232 / 

HearJ Chef: Mike Speno 

Catering Manager: 
1 Steve Kohler 

Consultants: Tom Bauer, 
Ed Bauer, Merry Bauer 

If you know the date and have a color scheme in 
mind, Eddie Bau&r's Parkway Caterers can do 
the rest. EverytHing! Starting with the profes- 
sionally engraved invitations and an- 
nouncements, floral arrangements, reception 
locations, decorations, musicians, photography, 
wedding cakes, #nd of course the all-important 
wedding dinner. (If you wish, we can arrange 
brilliant canvas-topped lawn enclosures for out- 
door weddings, li'mousines, just EVERYTHING!) 

Stop in for a cjhat... Parkway can handle- any 
detail, no matter how large or how small. We'd 
be most flattered to. tell you more. And, a very, 
VERY hearty congratulations to you and yours. 



Quality And 
Personal Care 

In Photographing Your Wedding 




OYounq 

Photography 




Specializing In Weddings Since 1976 

Present this ad at the show for a 
free engagement portrait. 

840 Durham Lane 
Grayslake, Illinois 



Congratulations 

ToThe 

Bride 

& 

Oroom 

(312)223-0033 



»«*m*mw «»H5Mrw*w>«iwtr 




Thursday, January i 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 9D 



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Dynasty' Tuxedos Lead Pack 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

With "Dynasty"- keeping 
the nightim'c soap opera 
fans glued to their tv sets 
every week, featuring dap- 
per gentlemen in tuxedo 
garb at almost every oc- 
casion, it is a natural lor 
Gingiss Formalwear Center 
to feature the "Dynasty 
Collection." 



According to a represen- 
tative -of Gingiss in 
Waukegan, at 2201 Grand 
Ave., has been outdistancing 
by far all of their other 
tuxedo styles that are being 

rented for weddings and 
other special occa ssior.s. 

The most popular, an ex- 
clusive in the Waukegan 



area, Is the "Sharkskin 
Dynasty," a medium grey 
tux with pleated pants. • 

The grey I'Carrington", 
the "Black Diamond" and 
the "Ivory Dynasty" are all 
getting a big rental play that 
is expected to continue 
through the spring and sum- 
mer wedding season. 

The Waukegan Gingiss is 



Tuxedo Still Going Strong 



Optimum Elegance 

The black, all wool, single breasted, one button 
evening jackel has salin-faced notched lapels and 
satin-piped besom pockets. It has a matching tour- 
button vest and traditional side striped formal 
trousers. 



The tuxedo was "born" at 
the first Autumn Ball in Oc- 
tober, 1886, when young 
Griswold Lorillard, son of 
Pierre V., wore the tailless 
dress coat to this grand ball' 
of the societal resort area of 
Tuxedo Park, N.Y. 

At this time. Tuxedo Park, 
40 miles northwest of New 
York City, overlooking 
Tuxedo Lake, was an elite 
hunting and fishing resort, 
known as the millionaire's 
■ haven. ' 

Lorillard, the fashion 
maverick, shockvd the 
society circle, when he spor- 
ted the tailless coat to the 
Tuxedo Park Club's white- 
tie-and-tails Autumn Ball. 

There are tales that the 
coat worn by Griswold (Griz- 
zy for short) was designed 
by his father and was a 
scarlet satin-lapeled affair 
which was tailored, if not 
tailed, along the lines of the 
pink coats worn by hunters 
riding to hounds. 

The tuxedo was not an in- 
stant success, yet it was not 
without its admirers. 
Traditionalists adopted a 



Tips On Toasting Newlyweds 



—DECIDE WHAT TO SER- 
VE. First, pick a drink for 
toasting. Champagne is a . 
wedding classic, but many 
marriages have been saluted 
with sparkling cider, bub- 
bling punch or white wine. 

Next, decide whether to of- 
fer this beverage alone 
throughout the reception or 
also have an open bar. It will 
depend largely on the type of 
party you have-an afternoon 
cake and punch reception 
doesn't call for anything else 
while an evening dinner dan- 
ce might. 

SAMPLE EVERYTHING 
AHEAD OF TIME. 

Especially try out the punch 
(a great-sounding recipe 
may not turn out exactly as 
you'd hoped). It should be 
ice cold and not too sweet to 
go best with the cake. 



DETERMINE HOW 
MUCH YOU'LL NEED. You 
can make sure the drinks 
last as long as the festivities 
by counting on each guest 
having two drinks the first 
hour, one more every hour 
after that. Generally, the 
later in the day the recep- 
tion, the more guests will 
drink. 

PLACE DRINK TABLES 
STRATEGICALLY so that 
drinkers and non-drnikers 
mix easily. Have waiters cir- 
culate with drink choices-or 
have both alcoholic and non- 
alcoholic beverages at all 
serving points. 

KEEP A CLEAR HEAD- 

and make sure guests do too. 
Ask the bartender to "mix 
light" when he feels it's 
" necessary. Serve some f ood- 
perhaps finger sandwiches 



or hot hors d'oeuvres-to 
curb the effect of the alcohol. 
Be sure to offer plenty of 
good strong coffee before 
guests head homeward. 

Incidentally, says iiridr\ a 
couples's wedding is only the 
first of many "toasting" oc- 
casions to come. They can 
prepare from now to 
celebrate their first an- 
niversary or new home by 
asking for wine and spirits 
as wedding presents. It's 
made easy by the new liquor 
gift registries popping up in 
liquor stores around the 
country. 

Through these registries, 
couples can list their 
favorite brands of liquor and 
wine for guests to select 
from-in much the same way 
that they register for china 
or silver at their local depar- 
tment store. 



Whether You're Considering Buying, 
Renting, Or Selling . . . You Need A Pro 

Call Roe & Roe Inc. Realtors 
today for all your housing needs. 



Waukegan 

2728 Grand 
Avenue 

(312)662-1021 



Antioch 

505 Orchard 
Street 

(312)385-7313 



Grayslake 

352 Center 
Street 

(312) 223-8178 



Gurnee 

541 .5 W.Grand 
Ave. 

(312) 360-9333 



We have 50 full-time sales associates to help you with your needs. Please call 
far free market analysis of your home. We belong to RELO relocation service. 



POEAPOE 




IMC. 
REALTORS 



m 



MLS 



® 



condescending attitude 
toward the innovation, 
regarding it as semi-formal 
evening attire. 



The tuxedo came in two 
styles: with a shawl collar 
and satin-faced lapels, and 
with peaked lapels. 



also in the process of ex- 
panding its stock on cum- 
berbunds and ties that mat- 
ch bridesmaid dresses. 

This use, to tie the outfits 
worn by the wedding paty 
together, is especially 
popular when the groom and 
his groomsmen wear the 
ivory or all white tuxedos. 

All tuxes available are 
ready and in stock and 
Gingiss also carries a com- 
plete line of gifts for the 
groomsmen. If there are five 
or more tuxs rented for the 
wedding party, the groom 
receives his free of charge. 



BON T 



jyjjiGESTic 



Vle<W"> n & 5 





. Live & Slidin' Thru the 
40's, 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's. 

Personalized music for all occasions. 

(312)546-6815 



Honeymoon Packages 

ORLANDO -DAYS INN Lakeside, One Week $yAQ - 

Includes R/T Air, Hotel Accommodations & Car ■ - ™ " 

JAMAICA — Americana From 729 
MEXICO (Cancun) - Viva Hotel From $ 6 9 9 

BAHAMAS (Nassau) From . 

Holiday Inn, Paradise Island Hotel 9 /59 

CARIBBEAN CRUISE - One Week With Air $AQC 
Starting At ^^W 

For an additional cost packages include extras — 
champagne, fruit basket, and an upgrade on ac- 
commodations. Rates are based on double oc- 
cupancy. Rates subject to change. 

We Also Of fer Complete 
Cruise Packages 

Consult The Professionals 

BARN LOFT 



^~ 



TRAVEL AGENCIES 



• Barn Loft East • Barn Loft North 



133 Delany Road 
Suite #900 
Gurnee 

(312)249-4994 



277 Rte. 173 
Antioch 

(312)395-9050 



• Barn Loft 

Rte. 120 & 134 
Grayslake 

(312)223-7771 



i-xc 



100 Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 997 



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Comfortable Shoes, Happy Bride 



On a wedding day, one 
should take into con- 
sideration two very im- 
portant itcms-the feet. Since 
they'll be on them most of 
the day, comfortable shoes 
are a must. Tired aching feet 
will only make for an un- 
comfortable bride. 

But wanting comfort 
doesn't have to mean for- 
saking style. Shoes should be 
the finishing touch on the 
beauty of the dress. 

For stylish comfort, think 
pumps. "Classic white 
pumps give the allure of 
simple elegance and 
gracefulness yet give sturdy 
support," says Steve 
Cassidy, women's dress shoe 
buyer for Kinney Shoes. 



From the newer low- 
heeled versions to the 
traditional high, there is a 
pump suitable for everyone. 
And a pair of white pumps 
will be a staple in any 
wardbrobe on the 
honeymoon and all through 
spring and summer. 

If one doesn't wear high 
heels everyday, don't wear 
them on the wedding day. 
There are many low-heeled 
and flat styles that can 
complete any look. If opting 
for high heels, make sure the 
fit is right. Here are some 
guidelines to follow when 
shopping Tor those special 
shoes: 

Have both feet measured; 
the two are not identical. 



Accomodate the larger 
foot, and if necessary, alter 
the fit of the other shoe. 

Shop after being on the 
feet awhile, not in the early 
morning. 

Wear hosiery similar to 
that being worn on the 
wedding day. 

After both shoes are on, 
wiggle the toes, walk on 
tiptoe and arch the feet. Sit 

down. Walk again. If the 
shoes don't fit now, don't 
count on breaking them in. 

Use a full-length mirror to 
see how the shoes will look to 
others. 



Antebellum Tradition 

Travel back to the past and play Scarlett O'Hara 1o your groom's Rhelt Butler in this 
antebellum-inspired gown of sheer polyester, impeccably designed with a sense of 
American heritage. Scallop lacing trims the stand-up collar and Schiffli em- 
broidered net with frolicking flounce adorns the yoke. This traditional style bursts 
gjwith modern vitality from a cascading baby lace ruffled hemline, highlighted by 
bow accents at the side which form the chapel train. 




Your Memories Will Bloom Forever 

At 




Red Rose Of Kenwood 
Kenwood Country Club 

Specializing in. . . 
•Wedding Receptions 
Showers 
•Rehearsal Dinners 

•Off-Premise Catering 

(Consider an outdoor wedding under a tent) 

In our newly decorated dining facility we 
offer complete party planning, cakes, 
flowers, photography, disc jockey or bands, 
video taping, and rentals. 

For More v£ ^ 

Information Call 
Ed Or Kathy Bauer 

Red Rose of Renwood 

1413 Haitfesville Road • Round Lake, IL 60073 • (312) 546-8242. 





Sunshine Flower 
Emporium 

A Full Service Florist 
FREE! FREE! FREE! 

Bring this ad in for a FREE Bridal 

Table Centerpiece or Throw Away 

Bouquet with your complete 

wedding order. 

•Wedding Accessories Available 

Wauconda Shopping Center 
455 W. Liberty,. 
Wauconda 

(312)526-7750 

Daily 9-7, Sat. 9-6, Sun. W-3 

VISA, MASTERCARD & AMERICAN EXPRESS ACCEPTED 





Miamar limousine Service, Ltd. 

"Luxurious Transportation" for the 
MOST Important Day of Your Lives! 




Keep Your Wedding Day A Truly Elegant Affair 
By Reserving Our "Picture Perfect" Super- 
Stretch White Cadillac Limousine. Champagne- 
Tone Plush Interior Is Custom Designed With 
A.M./F.M. Stereo Cassette, Color T.V. And 
Deluxe Bar. 

Bottle Of Champagne Courtesy Of Shamar. We 
Will Decorate Interior Of Car To Your 
Specifications Upon Request. Exterior 
Decorating To Be. Done By Chauffeurs If 
Weather Permits. 

Reservations Required: (312) 295-71 1 1 

View our White Lincoln Continental stretch at 
Lakehurst's Bridal Show January 23, 24 & 25. 



Thursday, January 15,.1.987 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 D. 



'I .;.T\+t<niMi&*0ti, 



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Cost Of Wedding Can Be Split By Families 

,. i ^/ . j;.Li. _r *u„ nnncMorPfi tn be "marrvlne Esoeciallv where the bride c 



It's traditional in the U.S. 
for the parents of the bride to 
cover the entire cost of a 
couple's wedding. But ac- 
cording to a recent article in 
ttride'M magazine, this 



situation is changing 

For the first time, there's 
a definite trend toward the 
sharing of wedding ex- 
penses. The groom's family, 
as well as the bride and 
groom themselves, are 



taking on a chunk of the 
financial responsibility. 

One reason for this may be 
changing attitudes toward 
the nature of marriage. In 
this era of liberation, a 
bride's parents are no longer 







considered to be "marrying 
off their daughter. Rather, 
the wedding is seen as the 
joining of two people, and 
two families, with everyone 
contributing to the 
festivities. 

A second reason is frankly 
economic: The cost of a for- 
mal wedding these days runs 
on average around $4,350, 
according to a iirfrfi*'* reader 
profile study. It can go as 
high as $10-$15,000 in some 
urban areas. 

Rather than cut back on 
their idea of the perfect 
celebration, many couples 
and their families are in- 
stead finding new ways to 
meet the expenses. 



Especially where the bride 
and groom are op their own 
and earning money them- 
selves (increasingly com- 
mon as the average age for 
marriage goes up), it only 
makes sense for them to pit- 
ch in. 

The actual dividing up of 
the costs can be done in 
several ways. An easy, tact- / 
ful method is to settle on 
specific expenses in ad- 
vance, rather than to just 
split the cost of the whole 
wedding down the middle. 

An alternate idea would be 
for one family to pay for the 
ceremony (flowers, church 
rental, limousines), the 



other to pick up the reception 
tab. Each family then has 
complete jurisdiction over 
their part of the celebration. 
There are many possible 
arrangements and the op- 
tions should be discussed 
openly and early in the 
engagement so an agreeable 
plan can be worked out. 

Incidentally, the idea of 
sharing wedding expenses is 
not really a new one. In 
many countries the practice 
has been followed for cen- 
turies. For instance, Spanish 
fathers of the bride and 
groom traditionally issue the 
invitation and host the wed- 
ding together. 



P«!S5r2M> 



Perfectly Matched 

Elegance is reflected tn spring colors for 1987. The groom wears the Sable tuxedo 
from the Dynasty Collection by After Six Formals. Matching double-pleated 
trousers with exciting new accessories for spring. Bridal gown by Alfred Angelo 
Bridals 





Warm Colors, Rich Textures, 

Sparkling Table Settings and 

Panoramic View of our 

Graceful Waterfall... 

Midlane Country Club Provides the Perfect 
Combination for Your Elegant Wedding. 



Our impeccable service compliments a supreme dining exper- 
ience for parlies from 20-260. 

A variety of taste-tempting hors d'oeuvres and entrees, all 
prepared in our own kitchen, is sure to please the most dis- 
criminating palate. 

Weddings • Showers • Rehearsal Dinners • Anniversaries 



At Midlane Country Club... 
One Good Thing Leads to Another. 





COUNTRY CLUB 



74565 Yorkhouse Road, Wadsworth, Illinois 
312/360-0550 



just 2 miles from Highway 41 
West of Waukcgan 




Aladdin Flower Shop] 

2911 Grand Ave., Waukegan 

(312) 244-2155 

"Wiete Wart Wetbting <3k*y> 9fa/u*... 

Visit our Bridal Consultation Room for ideas from 
Wedding Books and Large Sample Bouquets. 

FREE booklet for each Bride-to-be. 



Caterers of Quality Cuisine Since 1960 

Main Office: 




% 



904 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, Illinois 

A^% U < 312 > 36M630 

^m^ 'Catering Offices 

712 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, Illinois 

(312)3624232/367-1454 

Head Chef: Mike Speno . 

Catering Manager: 
Steve Kohler 

Consultants: Tom Bauer, 
Ed Bauer, Merry Bauer 

If you know the date and have a color scheme in . 
mind, Eddie Bauer's Parkway Caterers can do 
the rest. Everything! Starting with the profes- 
sionally engraved invitations and an- 
nouncements, floral arrangements, reception 
locations, decorations, musicians, photography, 
wedding cakes, and of course the all-important 
wedding dinner. (If you wish, we can arrange 
brilliant canvas-topped lawn enclosures for out- 
door weddings, limousines, just EVERYTHING!) 

Stop in for a chat. ..Parkway can handle any * 
detail, no matter how large or how small. We'd 
be most flattered to tell you more. And, a very, 
VERY hearty congratulations to you and yours. 



Wh 
with 

They 
arra 



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a' 



12D Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 






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Home Parties Supply New Bridal Registering 



Wedding bells will ring for purchased by friends and 

more than .2.5 million relatives. 

couples this year in the U.S. In fact, Americans made 

and cash registers will ring f" ch Purchases last year t0 

iv, e ,i„ B rt f « onc nr tne tune of nearly $14 billion, 

up the sales of tens of spending an £ yerage - 

millions of engagement, several hours shopping for 

shower and wedding gifts each gift. 



One way to make shopping 
for , wedding-rslated gifts a 
breeze is for the bride-to-be 

to register her choices. 
i 

Commonly done through 
the) bridal registry of a retail 
store, there is now an alter- 



Give Tips On Planning 
A Perfect Honeymoon 



When planning a trip, start 
with a good tavel agent. 
They can be a big help by 
arranging ground tran- 



sportation, sightseeing 
tours, theater tickets and 
providing information about 
currency, passports, good 




Beautiful Eyes 

By using easy-core sofl contact lenses, a bride can 
avoid the worry of cumbersome eyeglasses on her 
wedding day. 




restaurants and points of in- 
terest. 

jWhether one will be en- 
joying country comforts or 
brig-city, living, there are 
many considerations when 
choosing a place to stay. 

-Is it located near the 
places both want to go? 
J -How far from the airport 
is it and how will the 
honeymooners get there? 

-Does the place you've 
chosen offer any special 
honeymoon packages? 

-Are there sports facilities 
available that coincide with 
the couple's interests? 

-Be aware of what papers 
(passport, visa) and im- 
munizations may be needed. 

-Will credit cards be ac- 
cepted in the area being 
traveled to? 

In order to be helpful, your 
travel agent should know the 
budget, when time has been 
set aside, and how much, the 
type of experience the couple 
is looking for and things the 
two enjoy doing together. 
Remember to be open to 
suggestions-the couple may 
get a pleasant surprise. 



native that is more personal, 
convenient and entertaining. 
The new twist is to register 
choices-crystal, china, kit- 
chen products-with in- 
dependent consultants of 
home party firms. 

The process is very sim- 
ple. Just review the products 
in the company's catalog or 
actual samples and then list 
desired items on a special 
bridal registry form. 

Best of all, this can be done 
in the home, away from the 
bustle of a crowded store, 
and at a time that is con- 
venient for both the prospec- 
tive bride and the salesper- 
son who does not have dic- 
tated "store" hours. 



With this approach, a gift 
can be purchased and given 
in a party atmopshere. 

There are several formats 
for. selling home party 
products to friends and 
relatives of the bride-to-be. 
The bride can either register 
her selections before the par- 
ty or at the party. If the bride 
registers prior to the party, 
there are two approaches. 

At one, guests can order 
registered products from a 
catalog prior to the shower 
in the comfort of their own 
home. The sales consultant 
places the order, wraps and 
delivers all items to the par- 
ty site. The bride-to-be then 
opens the gifts at the party. 



Or, the consultant can 
demonstrate the bride's 
registered items to guests 
who then order their gifts 
directly at the party. The gif- 
ts are delivered to the bride- 
to-be's home a week or so af- 
ter the party. 

If the bride has not 
registered before the party, 
she can make her selections 
at the party. 

As with any party, the 
hostess is key to the success 
of the party. She is the per- 
son who invites the guests, 
keeps close watch of what is 
ordered and registers all or- 
ders on the bride's list. 



^ :-.:■- ■■.-■■.■■ -i^v. ■■:-.-.■■■-■ •,■■■,. :.-.;-:.'i:m ■.;-. v.;:r- M.-^.V.-. ■■i-,ii'ii,-„ t ■N.—iL.ii.i 







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We take special pride in the flowers 
for every vyedding we do. You won't 
find mass-produced, production line 
arrangements at The Arbour. We 
personally design every floral 
arrangement exactly as you want it. 

Please come in and let us show you 
what. we can do to help make your 
wedding perfect. - 

Free consultation with no obligation. 
Free silk toss bouquet wjth wedding 
order. Consultations by 
appointment only. 



s 



The ffrbour 

Florist 



INC. 



1333 Delany Rd., Gurnee, IL 60031^ 

(312) 360-0601 




,i HIW ff H 1 , ..)j lW n, i f.u . ».W<lj;j. i ..li. ! iUiii i .i !i .ii i i..v Jn.. i ! WWBWWBnr 





BRIDAL BOUTIQUE 

448 Sheridan Rd., Highwood, Illinois 

CLEARANCE ONE WEEK OMLY 
Bridal Gowns $ 100- $ 200 
Bridesmaid Gowns s 25 
Flower Girl Dresses s 20 

Prices reduced to make room 
for new arrivals. 

Appointment Suggested 

(312)433-2575 




The mo it unique and complete Bridal Boutique an the 
north shore. For your selection, over 500 gowns In 
stock to choose Irom. Including bridesmaid, mother of 
the bride, llowerglrl end prom dresses. We also failure 
a Tailor shop lor your entire family, wilh cleaning plant 
lor delicate garments, like Bridal end antique gowns. 
Other services as Heif looming Is also available. 



j2s£ <U<L ^S/Louj njou <=Ho«j ScLty <Jt Can. !Be 
<Do <=Hclue. CT&e. ^WzdcLing Of <l/ouz H^izam*. 




l^ox lPai±onaLizad ^Sezulcz Call Chzis. c/ft 

<ZzA/{cL*VGLCr£,LcL 4** 

(Coxnzx oftzRt. 59 & ^xandcJfue.. & ^Wmdington <St.J 

(3 1 2) 5S7-6 1 00 

ContfxCsU ^Package. <=^fualCaBC£ 9oi 50 *3o 500 ZPeofiCz 
j7/x SCe-Qan-t ZPiLoatE, tz/xoomi.. 



5,1987 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 13D 







■»■'*-** 








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Groom Often Has Some Important Questions 



Who pays for the wedding? 
What are the duties of the 
Best Man? What should I 
wear to be correctly attired? 

Those are but a few of the 
questions which may puzzle 
prospective bridegrooms. 
Most of the answers to those 
questions have pat answers, 
many of them having been 
handed down from antiquity, 
others being relatively 
modern in conception. 

The American For- 
malwear Assn., being expert 
on the rules and mores of 
weddings and their at- 
tendant rules and 
obligations, has compiled a 
list of the most often asked 
questions by grooms and the 
AFA has supplied the an- 
swers that currently apply to 
them. 

Some who can afford it go 
to wedding counselors to find 
out what to wear, what to do 
and how to do it. The 
following will answer most, 
if not all, of the questions 
that the average groom may 
pose: 



Q.: Who or what decides if 
the wedding is to be formal, 
semiformal or informal? ' 

A.: Those decisions are 
usually up to the bride, and 
are often determined by the 
choice of gown that she 
wears and the site of the 
ceremony. 

If she wears a long gown 
with a train, the ceremony is 
definitely formal. If the 
bride elects to wear only a 
veil with her gown, the 
ceremony can be considered 
to be semi-formal. 

Q.: If the wedding is for- 
mal, what do I wear? 

A. In the daytime, a cut- 
away coat and striped 
trousers. However, in some 
contemporary weddings the 
groom will wear a white 
tailcoat, but traditionalists 
hold out for the gray cut- 
away. 

For a contemporary 
evening formal ceremony, 
the groom may wear a black 
or white full dress (tailcoat), 
while the traditionalist will 



Men's Bracelets 
More Popular 



Bracelets were once an in- 
dispensable part of every 
well-dressed man's attire, 
worn by everyone from King 
Tutankhamum - to 
Shakespeare. Now that men 
are rediscovering their 
jewelry heritage, bracelets 
are back in a big way. 

Wrist chains with bold, in- 
teresting links are among 
the most popular styles. The 
identification bracelet, in- 



troduced by World War II 
GIs, continues in popularity. 

A modern variation is the 
heavy chain linked to 
equally bold letters spelling 
out a man's name or initials. 

New kinds of wrist action' 
for men include cuff and 
bangle bracelets in shiny or 
textured finishes, as well as 
wire and clamp-on styles. 
These are popular gifts from 
the groom to the ushers. 



wear the classic white tie 
and tails. 

Q.: If the wedding is semi- 
formal, what do I wear? 

A.; For a traditional 
daytime wedding, a gray 
stroller with striped 
trousers. 

For a contemporary 
daytime wedding, a tuxedo 
of one's choice or an updated 
stroller. 

For a traditional evening 
ceremony, a black tuxedo or 
a white dinner jacket. For a 
contemporary evening wed- 
ding, a tuxedo of one's 
choice. 

Q.: What do my ushers or 
groomsmen wear? 

A.: In a traditional 
ceremony, the same as the 
groom, with the exception of 
the boutonierre which in the 
groom's case should be a 
sprig of lily-of-the-valley 
from the bride's bouquet. 

In a contemporary wed- 
ding, the groomsmen may 
dress a "step down" from 
the groom, i.e., if the groom 
wears a tailcoat, the groom- 
smen may wear a short coat. 
Q.: What do the fathers of 
the bride and groom wear? 

A.: The same rules apply 
to the fathers as to the 
ushers and groomsmen. 

(}.: Do I give a present to 
the bride? 

A..* As a rule, the gift of the 
wedding ring is considered 
to be sufficient. However, 
there is no rule against of- 
fering her a further token of 
one's devotion. 

Q. : Do I owe a gift to any of 
the wedding members? 

A.: Yes. Some small gift- 
should be made to the ushers 
or groomsmen. Dress studs, 



cuff .links, pocket jewelry or 
the' like is- appropriate. 
Those gifts serve as memen- 
tos of the occasion. 

Q.: Who decides on the 
type, place and length of the 
honeymoon? 

A.: Those decisions should 
be made by agreement bet- 
ween the bride and the 
groom. Its type is usually 
determined by financial 
capabilities and the 
available time for the trip. 

Q.: Who provides the 
bride's bouquet? 

A.: The groom buys his 
bride's bouquet and also the 
usher's boutonierres. 



Q.: Who pays for the 
honeymoon? 

A.: The groom! 

Q.: Who gives * the 
honorarium to the officiating 
reverend or judge? 

A.: The groom. 

Q. : Who pays for the rental 
of formalwear? 

A.: The groom and the 
members of the wedding 
each pay for their own. 

Q.: Who pays for the wed- 
ding? 
o A. : The bride's family. 

Q.: What are the duties of 
the Best Man? 

A.: The Best Man attends 
the groom prior to 



ceremony, hands him the 
, ring to place on the bride's 
finger during the cer- 
memony and offers, the first 
toast to the bride and groom 
at the reception. 

He also reads, to all 
assembled, any and all 
congratulatory messages 
sent to the bride and groom 
at the reception. 

Q.: If I am a member of 
the military, is it correct for 
me to be married in 
uniform? 

A.: In the U.S., one usually 
only wears a uniform if in ac- 
tive service. 



V »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»3>»»»»»»»&» % 






?? m H<M£MOOIt$ SPiffll ?? 

We think so, and we want you to know that we give the 
same special attention to a weekend at Lake Geneva as we 
do to the Grand Tour of Europe. We also think belated and 
second honeymoons are equally important. 

It's nice to know you have a friend in the business when you 
are planning your special honeymoon. If you have a little to 
spend or a lot, your honeymoon is as important to us as it is 
to you. 

Call us to set up an appointment or just stop by. We are 
ready to assist you and have the expertise necessary to 
make your honeymoon a memorable experience. 



% 



u 

vme 
Kauri 
lave 

SL's 

inn 



3£ 827 S.Lake St. 
(|p Mundelein 



Member 
ASTA. 

AiMrieon Sod«fy 
ol Trov«4 Agwrti 



23178 N.Hwy. 45 
(atHwy.21) M 
Lincolnshire-Half Day 



TflA# |,f l $ 
$ (312) 949-1640 *s£s&z (312)634-1640 




.&!?* 




The elegant 
atmosphere of our 
new banquet rooms is 
the ideal setting for 
memorable weddings, 
christenings, bar mitzvahs, reunions, gala dinner 
dances, political and social luncheons or dinners, 
school proms, fashion shows, bowling banquets, 
and organized business meetings. We are 
especially experienced in outdoor weddings, taking 
advantage of our lovely, professionally landscaped 
grounds. Please feel free to call for any additional 
information or questions you may have. 



FOR THE WEDDING m*-,. 

^vlcidz On cyrzcLuzn 

Let us at the Country House help plan that , 
reception of your dreams. 

We offer several dinner packages which 
include - Family Style - Buffet - Sit D awn. 

You may choose to have one of our Bar 
Packages or a Cash Bar. 

We have two rooms to choose from. One of 
which we provide the entertainment for your 
listening pleasure. 

CcWthll HDUfte (3121395-4211 

Rt. 173(1 Block West Of Rt. 59) * W * " W ^ W ^^ * * 



AntJoch, IL 





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Sleek Sophistication 
Look Of 1 987's Bride 



Tie Wedding Party 

American weddings: it's everyone's moment to celebrate, including Yves St. 
(aurent and Bill Blass, two of America's premier men's formalwear designers who 
lave joined to create this totally coordinated formal wedding. The groom wears 
[SL's double-breasted dinner jacket: his men, Bill Blass' classic white shawl collar 
[inner jacket. All the gowns by Alfred Angelo. 

esearch Ancient Customs 



Today's _"' wedding 
rcmonial traditions are a 
ique blend of many 
tional customs, some 
ting back from centuries 

o; 

Today, a bride may sign 

tin ancient marriage con- 

jEract originally devised by 

- Anglo-Saxons. She may walk 

ttjfcwn the aisle in a Gothic 

.^Cathedral to Richard 

gWagner's Uttrnprin , 

The. bride may wear a 
medieval veil, a Jewish 
coronet made of Pagan 
orange blossoms and her 
wedding ring may be of 
Roman descent. 




During the ceremony, if 
she kneels at the altar, she 
will be following the custom 
of ancient Egyptian brides. 

The following are a few 
more explanations of the 
rituals we follow today and 
their origins. 

According to the ancient 
Romans, weddings are held 
in June, partially because of 
the warm weather, but more 
importantly because May 
was considered an unlucky 
month. 

Today's tradition of ex- 
changing wedding bands is a 
throwback to the medieval 
times when people wore 



signet rings to put their seal 
on agreements. 

When the newlyweds 
depart after the wedding 
celebration they still pretend 
to flee, as though the irate 
brothers and fathers were 
still chasing after them. 

During the most primitive 
times, men acquired their 
wives by stealing them, and 
then hiding -them until the 
families' anger was lessened 
by the passing moons. This 
time when the couple was in 
hiding was sweet, which is 
why the period after the wed- 
ding is still called the 
"honeymoon." 



Many of the prospective 
Lake County brides that are 
planning spring and summer 
weddings really don't want 
to look like everyone's image 
of the typical bride, that's 
why the three S's are what 
1987's weddings are all 
about. 

"I want something 
sleeker, something a little 
more sophisticated, yet soft" 
is a request often heard at 
Milady's Bridal in Ban- 
nockburn. 

One of the answers is this 
year's., slim bridal sheath 
with a detachable train. The 
growing popularity of the t- 
length wedding and at- 
tendants gowns is another 
and the rich creamy glow of 
a bridal gown done in ivory 
or candelight lace is yet a 
third answer to eliminating 
the "Princess For a Day" 
look that has reigned over 
the bridal market for many 
years. 

In fact, Lisa Lee of 
Milady's tells us that, though 
all wedding dresses come in 
both ivory and white, they 
sell more of the softer color 
because its more flattering 
to the average girl. 

"The A-symetrical look is 
also very popular this year," 
added Lee, describing a 
bodice with a right side done 
in one-fourth inch diagonal 
tucks that turns into three- 
fouth-inch tucks on the left 
side. The beading motif is 
also different on each side of 
the bodice. 

Wide, shoulder and collar- 
bone revealing necklines 



The wedding day of your dreams begins with 
the wedding dress 01 your dreams. 




Complete attire for all weddings. 
View our new bridal fashions 

and 

Visit our booth dt the Bridal Expo '87 

January 18th, 1987 
Holiday Inn-Gurnee 

Inquire about our special discounts to brides-to-be and their bridesmaids. 

2529 Waujkegau Rd., BattMockbiini, IL 

(B an no ckburn Green) 
at intersection of Rts. 43 & 22 

(312) 940-0066 






lead the bridal fashion 
parade in both wedding and 
bridesmaides' gowns with 
the on-or-off the shoulder 
gown much in demand. 

"This is because many 
churches don't allow off the 
shoulder gowns, but the girls 
want them, this way they 
can wear them up for the 
wedding and off the shoulder 
for the reception," said Lee. 
Alencon lace, long a 
popular bridal fabric, 
billows even more strongly 
for the '87 bride. 

Attendants' gowns in taf- 
feta and "any shade of pink 
from a soft shell pink to a 
deep magenta or shocking 
pink, will be this season's 
most popular color," predic- 
ts Lee. 

Shades of lavender and 
blue are also on the favorites 
list, and peach, the most 
popular color a decade ago, 
as making a comeback. 

The cool shades of the at- 
tendants' dresses are geared 
to go with the grays and 
blacks, still the most popular 
colors in the tuxs to be worn 
by the groomsmen. But with 
peach reentering the scene, 
the cream tux, or "peaches 
and cream" combination, 
might be the season's dark 
horse. 

There is usually little 
separation between what is 
popular in one category of 
fashion and its relation to 
another fashion category or 
even to home decorations. 

The new look in bridal 
headgear is called the pouff, 
this describes the verv 



popular puffy cloud of 
veiling that swirls like a 
cloud around the bride's 
head, pouring from all sorts 
of bridal toppers, from Juliet 
caps, to floral wreaths, to 
crowns, making the bride 
seem taller and more regal 
andethreal. 

But no matter what style 
she has chosen to wear, or 
what she crowns herself 
with, all of 1987's brides will 
be beautiful, its guaranteed. 

Silver 
Has A 
History 

Prior to the 19th century, 
silver in America was a 
made-to-order business con- 
ducted by the town's silver- 
smith. Customers sought 
him out for specific silver ar- 
ticles. 

Samuel Kirk & Sons foun- 
ded the first silversmithing 
firm in Baltimore, Md., in 
1815. 

The hunt for a substitute 
for sterling silver led to the 
discoveries of the alloys, 
Brittania Metal and German 
Silver. 

The process of elec- 
troplating, discovered in 
"England, was brought to the 
attention of the Rogers 
Brothers o[ Connectivut. In 
1847 they began to produce 
plated ware. 




K. 



KE VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 



COMBINATION 

VIDEO & 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

$599.00 



SEE US AT THE EXPO 
FOR DETAILS 



VIDEO 

265 Center 
Grayslake, IL60030 




$25 OFF 



Reg. video plan 

1 -Original Tape And 
1 -Edited Highlight Tape 

-Offer Expires 3/1/87 

-First Come First Served 

-One Offer Per Bridal Party 

•Offer Good Only With Coupon 



Robert Slipke. . . . Videographer (312) 223-1557 
Don Cass Photographer (312) 223-1939 



,1967 



jrsday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 15D 



U 2zH&ta,~«£ ttert*t' *>io**' a *& : > 



vt£££Vfi?*<fr3Z&*' *o™« *#«•«<«* 



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V~#* 



r&S^ 






5> 







Luke County s Ldraes 1 
Formal wear Renter 



Ji Tuxedos Stocked In Our Store 



)</E&\IN#JRENr 



pierre cardin 

MBB «WVC*K 





WEDDING INVITATIONS WHEN 

YOU REGISTER YOUR 

WEDDING TUXEDOS 



•NO CHARGE for Groom when 5 or more 

tuxes are rented 

©On the spot alterations if necessary 

©Out of town guest service (over 200 stores) 

©Thursday pick up for Saturday weddings 

©Ring Bearer discount 

©All Tuxedos In Stock 








p, 




I 




\Waukegan Gingiss Only 



i 



2201 Grand Ave. 
Waukegan 

-0404 





16D Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5. 1 987 



— - — ■~-~-^ ^i^. - " • 



-., - .- •:, .,.,..-• V. ' --. '-■.-•■ ■ 






5,1987 



.___'■ ■ ^ -— 


MTJj33-T— 1-^ * sports • 


Li L-L-LI — I L A. I ^^— 



m 



6:30 P.M. 
-Bears '86 
[ESPN] - NHL Hockey: Teams to 
]e Announced (3 hrs.) Live. 
7:30 P.M. 
_ - College Basketball: Southern 
lorida at DePaul (2 hrs.) 
9:00 P.M. 
Chicago Bears Highlights (60 

■sin.) * 

9:30 P.M. 

|[ESPNJ - NFL Films Film highlights 
lot Super Bowl XIV with the Pittsburgh 
ISieelers and the Los Angeles Rams. 

10:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
jwnunden The Final Four Live. 

10:30 P.M. 
I - WWF Superstars of Wrestling 
(60 mm,) 
[ESPN] - Sportscenter Saturday 

11:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - World Class Champion- 
ship Wrestling (60 mm.) 

12:00 A.M. 

[[ESPN] - Rollermania (60 min.) 

12:30 A.M. 
[60 - Monster of the Mat Wrestling. 
1(60 min.) 

1:00 A.M. 
I [ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:30 A.M. 
[[ESPN1- SportsCenter 

2:00 A.M. 
[[ESPN] - NHL Hockey: Teams to 
| Be Announced (3 hrs.) (R). 

SUNDAY 

1/18/87 

5:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Swimming: McDonald's 
t U.S. Open Championships Coverage 
from Orlando. FL (2 hrs.) (R), 

7:00 A.M. 
(ESPN] - SportsCenter 

7:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - College Football '86: A 
Look Back 

8:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Flshin', Hole (60 min.) 

9:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Scholastic Sports Amer- 
ica 

9:30 A.M. 
O - Universal Wrestling Federation 
(60 min.) 

[ESPN] - Sportscenter Sunday: 
This Week in Sports (60 min.) 

10:30 A.M. 

O - Bowling With the Champs (60 
min.) 

[ESPN] - Sporttcenter's NFL 
Garneday 

11:00 A.M. 
GO- NBA Basketball: Houston 
Rockets at Boston Celtics (2 hrs.. 30 
min,) Live. 

[ESPN] - NFL's Superstars Pat 
Fischer. 

11:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] -College Basketball: 1983 
Final Four Highlights Highlights of 
the 1983 final lour college basket- 
ball teams - North Carolina State, 
Houston. Georgia, and Louisville. 

12:00 P.M. 
O - College Basketball; North 
Carolina State at North Carolina (2 
hrs.) Live. 

[ESPN] - Tennis: Pr ingles Light 
Pro-Celebrity Classic From Turn- 
berry isle, FL. (60 min.) 

1:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Bodybuilding: 1986 AAU 
Ms. Universe Championship From 
Tuson, AZ. (60 min.) (R). 

1:30 P.M. 
Q Q - College Basketball: Syra- - 
cuse at Michigan (2 hrs.) Live. 

2:00 P.M. 
O - SportsWorld (90 min.) 
- SportsWorld Today's program 
features coverage ol the World Pro- 
fessional Figure Skating Champion- 
ships from Landover, MD. (90 min.) 
Tape Delayed. 

(ESPN] - MI5L Soccer: Baltimore 
Blast at Cleveland Force (2 hrs.) 
Live. 

3:30 P.M. 
- CBS Sports Sunday To. 
day's program features taped cover- 
age of the World Triathlon Champion- 
ships from Nice, France and live 
coverage of John Madden's personal 
'all-pro' football team from the Rose 
Bowl in Pasadena, CA. (90 min.) 

- Golf: Bob Hope Chrysler 
Classic (2 hrs.) Live. 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
from Super Bowl XIX with the San 
Francisco Forty-niners and the Miami 
Dolphins. 

4'30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 

01 Super Bowl XX with the Chicago 
Bears and the New England Patriots. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - World Cup Skiing: Men's 



Super G From Garmisch. Switzer- 
land. (60 min.) 

6:00 P.M. 
CD - World Championship Wrestling 
(60 min.) 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Subaru Ski World 

7:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - AWA Wrestling (2 hrs.) 

9:00 P.M. 
CD - Coors Sports Page 
[ESPN] - Rollermania (60 min.) 

10:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge . 
Downunden The Final Four (4 hrs.) 
Live, 

10:25 P.M. 
- Sports Sunday 

10:30 P.M. 
O - Bears Extra 
- Sports Final 

11:15 P.M. 
- Sports Machine 

2:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

2:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Baseball: Equitable Old- 
Timers Classic Series (60 min.) (R). 

3:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Horse Show Jumping: 
1986 Michelob Jumping Champion- 
ship From Tampa, FL. (90 min.) 

MONDAY 
1/19/87 

7:30 A.M. 

[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

8:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - World Cup Skiing: Men's 
Super G From Garmisch, Switzer- 
land. (60 min.) (R). 

9:00 A.M. 
(ESPN] - 1986 Ektelon National 
Racquetball Championships Cover- 
age from Anaheim, CA. (60 min.) 
(R). 

10:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Jimmy Ballard Golf Con- 
nection 

10:30 A.M. 
[ESPN1 - Mazda SportsLook 

1 1:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Ocean Sprays Bodies In 
Motion 

12:00 P.M. . 
[ESPN] - MISL Soccer Baltimore 
Blast at Cleveland Force (2 hrs.) (R). 

2:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: 
Teams to Be Announced (2 hrs.) 
Live. 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN]- NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl XV with the Oakland 
Raiders and the Ptilffldophia Eagles. 

4:30 P.M. 

€S - NBA Basketball: Chicago Bulls 

at Indiana Pacers (2 hrs., 30 min.) 

[ESPN] - Gillette World of Sports 

4:40 P.M. 

139 - Today's Racing Horse.Racl.ig 
Coverage. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: St. 
Johns at Pittsburgh (2 hrs.) Live. 

7:05 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Atlanta 
Hawks at Detroit Pistons (2 hrs., 1 5 
min.) 

7:30 P.M. 
O - College Basketball: Indiana 
State at DePaul (2 hrs.) 

8:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Iowa 
at Purdue (2 hrs.) Live. 

10:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunder: The Final Four Live. 

10:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

11:30 P.M. 
CD - Motorweek 
[ESPN] - Ffshtn* Hole (60 min.) 

12:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Auto Racing: Nikki Lauda 
Explains Formula One 
1:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

1:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

2:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Iowa 
at Purdue (2 hrs.) (R). 

4:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Auto Racing '86: World 
Sports Car Championship Fuji 1000 
from Japan. (60 min.) (R). 

TUESDAY 
1/20/87 

7:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 
8:00 A.M. 



[ESPN] - Tennis: Pringles Light 



Pro-Celebrity Classic From Turn- 
berry Isle, FL. (60 min.) (R). 

9:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Top Rank Boxing from At- 
lantic City, NJ (90 min.) (R). 

10:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

11:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Ocean Sprays Bodies in 
Motion 

12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: St. 
Johns at Pittsburgh (2 hrs.) (R). 

2:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Baseball: Equitable Old- 
Timers Classic Series (60 min.) (R). 

3:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Fishin' Hole (60 min.) 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl XVI with the San Fran- 
cisco Forty-niners and the Cincinnati 
Bengals. 

4:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Scholastic Sports Amer- 
ica 

4:40 P.M. 
60 - Today's Racing Horse Racing 
Coverage. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Virgi- 
nia Tech at Louisville (2 hrs.) Live. 

7:30 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Chicago Bulls (2 hrs., 30 
min.) 

8:00 P.M. 
Q3 - Shoccer Soccer (60 min.) 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Clem- 
son at Georgia Tech (2 hrs,) Live. 

10:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunder: The Final Four (4 hrs.) 
Live. 

WEDNESDAY 
1/21/87 

7:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

8:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Clem- 
son at Georgia Tech (2 hrs.) (R). 

10:00 A.M. 
[ESPN]- NBA Today 

10:30 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

11:00 A.M. 
[ESPN] - Ocean Sprays Bodies in 
Motion 

12:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Virgi- 
nia Tech at Louisville (2 hrs.) (R). 

2:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Bodybuilding: 1986 AAU 
Mr. Universe Championship Cover- 
age from Tucson, AZ. (60 min.) 

3:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - AWA Wrestling (60 min.) 

4:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - NFL Films Film highlights 
of Super Bowl XVII with the Washing- 
ton Redskins and the Miami Dol- 
phins, 

4:40 P.M. 
03 - Today's Racing Horse Racing 
Coverage. 

5:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Con- 
necticut at Georgetown (2 hrs.) Live. 

6:30 P.M. 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Cleveland Cavaliers (2 hrs., 
30 min.) 

7:00 P.M. 
QD - An Evening of Championship 
Skating 1986 Taped live at Harvard 
University, the world's top figure ska- 
ters compete in pair skating, ice 
dancing, and men's and women's 
skating in the 1 7th annual exhibition. 
World champion Brian Boitano and 
U.S. dance champions Renee Roca 
and Donny Adair are featured, (60 
min.) '.- 

7:30 P.M. 
- College Basketball: DePaul at 
Evansville (2 hrs.) 

8:00 P.M. 
CD - An Evening of Championship 
Skating 1986 Taped live at Harvard 
University, the world's top figure ska- 
ters compete in pair skating. Ice 
dancing, and men's and women's 
skating in the 17th annual exhibition. 
World champion Brian Boitano and 
U.S. dance champions Renee Roca 
and Donny Adair are featured. (60 
min.) 

[ESPN] - College Basketball: VII- 
lanova at Syracuse (2 hrs.) Live. 

8:30 P.M. 

Q3 - Boxeo 



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«^ .^rr L-irr"'- T 




20/20 



Barbara Walters hosts 
"20720," the ABC News mag- 
azine. THURSDAY, JAN. 22, 

on ABC. 



POINTER SISTERS 
SPECIAL 



June (I.J, Anita and Ruth 
Pointer surround guest star 
Bruce Willis in their first musi- 
cal special, "The Pointer Sif- 
ters ... Up Ail Nile," airing 
FRIDAY, JAN. 23, on NBC. On 
the special, Willis will perform 
some original songs from his 
upcoming debut album. 





THE GOLDEN GIRLS 



Her three housemates doubt 
Rose (Betty White), who 
thinks she died, went to "the 
outskirts of heaven" and re- 
turned to life, in the "Before 
and After" episode of NBC's 
"The Golden Girls." It airs 
SATURDAY, JAN. 24. 



THE NEW MIKE 
HAMMER 



Mike Hammer (Stacy Keach) 
seeks to help an amnesiac 
who appears in his office, but 
it becomes apparent that the 
man figures importantly in the 
plans of Soviet and U.S. se- 
cret agents, on CBS's "The 
New Mike Hammer," airing 
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21. 




Daily Plate Luncheon 

Fish Fry Friday 

Saturday Night Prime Rib 

Sunday Dinners 

Plus A Full Menu Selection 

PRA TSER'S SIL VER SADDLE 

For Reservations Phone (312) 223-8424 

Rt. 83 & Center St., Grayslake, IL • Closed Thursday 

Diners Club, American Express & Carte Blanche Welcome 



6 




i 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 5C 



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Work • Sport * Safety * leisure • Womans Comfort Shoes 



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(312)336-1447 • 1902 Grand Ave., Wkgn. (Corner Grand & Lewis) 



11:30 P.M. 
Q 0- Late Night with David Let- 
terman In Stereo. 
O - MOVIE: 'King* Part 3. 
CD - Agony 

SB - Entertainment Tonight 
CD - MOVIE: 'The Laughing Police- 
man' 

ED - Too Close for Comfort 
ED - 700 Club 

11:35 P.M. 
CD- MOVIE: 'Once You Kiss a Stran- 
ger' 

11:40 P.M. 
- MOVIE: 'To Be Announced* 

11:50 P.M. 
(hboj - MOVIE: 'Murphy's Romance' 
(CC) 

12:00 A.M. 
O - VegaS 



CD - Chicago Tonight 
CD - ABC News NighUine 
ED - Benny Hill Show 
ED - Jimmy Swaggart 

12:30 A.M. 
O - Million Dollar Chance of a Life- 
time 

- News (R). 
CD-I, Claudius 
CD - Police Woman 
ED - Entertainment Tonight 
©- 700 Club 

1:00 A.M. 
- CBS News Nightwatch 
O - News 
- New Cross wits 
- Falcon Crest 
O - Tales of the Unexpected 
ED - Alfred Hitchcock Presents 

1:30 A.M. 



O - Crook and Chase 
- Warner Saunders 
O CD - News (R). 
- Hogan's Heroes 
CD -CNN News 

CD - Up on Melody Mountain 

1:40 A.M. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: The Park Is Mine' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

. 1:50 A.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Countdown* 

2:00 A.M. 
O - Strike It Rich 
- News 

O - MOVIE: 'Murder on the Bridle 
Path' 

- Odd Couple 
CD - Tales of the Unexpected. 
ED - Nite Lite 
|ESPN) -SportsCenter 



.' 



8:00 P.M. 
- MOVIE: 'The Man With Two 
Brains* 

O - Hill Street Blues 
CD - Moonlighting (CC). (R). 
C0 - Conservatives 
CD - Nova: Countdown to the Invisi- 
ble Universe (CC). 
CD - ACE Awards 
GD - Shoccer Soccer 
63 - MacNeit-Lehrer Newshour 
ED - Adventures in Learning 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Clem- 
son at Georgia Tech Live. 

8:30 P.M. 
ED - Joy of Music 

9:00 P.M. 
O - Unsolved Mysteries 
O CD - Jack and Mike (CC). 
- News 
CD - Grcylord 

60 - Novela: El Sol Sale para Todos 
ED - Nightly Business Report 
ED - John Ankerberg 
|HBOJ - 1st & Ten In Stereo. 

9:30 P.M. 
CD - East of Occidental (CC). 
ED - American Interests 
ED - 700 Club 

(HBO) - Don Johnson: The Making of 
Heartbeat In Stereo. 

10:00 P.M. 
QOOOOfS- News 
O - Honeymooners 
CD - World of Survival 
CD - Nightly Business Report 
CD - MOVIE: "The Viking Queen' 
CD - Benny Hill Show 
ED - Information 26 
ED - Late Show: Starring Joan Riv- 
ers 

ED - Hatha Yoga 

(ESPN) - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunder. The Final Four Uve. 

10:30 P.M. 
- T.J. Hooker (R). 
Q - Magnum, P.I. 

- Tonight Show In Stereo. 

- Barney Miller 

- ABC News NighUine 

CD - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 

CD - Centennial 

CD - M'A'S'H 

CD - Tonight Show 

ED - Novela: El Hijo de Angela Maria 

ED - We're Cooking Now 

ED - CNN News 

IHBO) - MOVIE: 'Troll' In Stereo. 

11:00 P.M. 
O - Hart to Hart 
O - MOVIE: "Holocaust* Part 2. 
CD - Odd Couple 
ED - Sanford and Son 
ED - Woodwright's Shop 
ED - Jim & Tammy 

11:30 P.M. 
O - Late Night with David Let- 
terman In Stereo. 
- MOVIE: 'King* Part 2. 
CD - Romantic Roads ol Germany 
CD - Agony 

CD - Entertainment Tonight 
CD - MOVIE: 'Commandos' 
ED - Cinema 26 
ED - Too Close for Comfort 

11:40 P.M. 
- MOVIE: 'To Be Announced' 

12:00 A.M. 
O - Police Story 
CD - Chicago Tonight 

CD - ABC News NighUine 

CD - MOVIE: 'Trog' 

ED - Benny Hill Show 

ED - Jimmy Swaggart 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Re-Animator' 
12:30 AM. 

O - Million Dollar Chance of a Life- 
time 

- News (R). 

CD-I, Claudius 

CD - Police Woman 

ED - Entertainment Tonight 

ED - 700 Club 

1:00 A.M. 

- CBS News Nightwatch 

O - News 

- New Crosswits 

- Falcon Crest 

O - Tales of the Unexpected 

ED - Alfred Hitchcock Presents 
1:30 A.M. 

O - Crook and Chase 

- Warner Saunders 

O CD - News (R). 

- Hogan's Heroes 

CD - CNN News 

ED - Heritage Singers 

|HBO) - MOVIE: 'Almost You' (CC) 
2:00 A.M. 

O - Strike It Rich 



■■ 



- News 

O - MOVIE: 'Murder on a Honey- 
moon' 

- Odd Couple 
CD - Tales of the Unexpected 
CD - MOVIE: 'The Killers' 
[ESPN) - SportsCenter 

WEDNESDAY 
1/21/87 

12:00 P.M. 
(ESPN)- College Basketball: Virginia 
Tech at Louisville (R). 

12:05 P.M. 
CD - MOVIE: 'Lost in a Harem' 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Jewel of the Nile' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

2:00 P.M. 
CD - Grcylord 

[ESPNI - Bodybuilding: 1986 AAU 
Mr. Universe Championship 

3:00 P.M. 
(Hboj - MOVIE: 'Blue Line' 
[ESPN] - AWA Wrestling 

4:00 P.M. 
|HBO] - It's No Crush, I'm in Love 
(ESPNI - NFL Films 

4:40 P.M. 
ED - Today's Racing 

5:00 P.M. 
|HBO) - MOVIE: 'Once Bitten' (CC) 
|ESPN| - Mazda SportsLook 

5:30 P.M. 
[ESPN] - SportsCenter 

6:00 P.M. 
O CD - News 
- Barney Miller 
CD CD - MacNeit-Lehrer Newshour 
CD - Gimme a Break 
S3 - tnformaclon 26 
ED - Three's Company 
ED - Principles of Accounting 
ED - Food for Life 
[ESPN] - College Basketball: Con- 
necticut at Georgetown Live. 

6:05 P.M. 
CD - Sanford and Son 
6:30 P.M. 
O - Wheel of Fortune 
- New Newlywed Game 
- Card Sharks 
- Jeffersons 
CD - Hollywood Squares 
CD - NBA Basketball: Milwaukee 
Bucks at Cleveland Cavaliers 
63 - Encuentro Astrologico 
ED - M*A*S*H 
ED - TV High School 
ED - Headline News 
[HBO| - Not Necessarily the News In 
Stereo. 

6:35 P.M. 
CD - Honeymooners 

7:00 P.M. 
- New Mike Hammer 
Q - Highway to Heaven (CC). tn 
Stereo. 

O CD - Perfect Strangers (CC). 
- Hogan's Heroes 
CD - An Evening of Championship 
Skating 1986 
CD - Chicago Tonight 
S3 - Novela: Atrevete 
ED - MOVIE: 'Days of Heaven' 
ED - TV High School 
ED - Windy City Alive 

|HBO] - MOVIE: 'Stripes' (CC) 
7:05 P.M. 

CD - MOVIE: 'The Sons of Katie 

Eider' 

7:30 P.M. 

CD - Head of the Class (CC). 

- College Basketball: DePaul at 

Evansville 

CD - Wild America (CC). 

ED - Marketing Perspectives 
8:00 P.M. 

- Magnum, P.I. 

O - Gimme a Break (CC)i In 

Stereo. 

CD - Dynasty (CC). Part 2 of 2. 

CD - Eyes on the Prize: Awakenings 

1954-1956 (CC). 

CD - An Evening of Championship 

Skating 1986 

ED - Entre Amlgos 

ED - MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour 

ED - Faith In Focus 

[ESPN] - College Basketball: Vitlan- 

ova at Syracuse Live. 
8:30 P.M. 

ED - Boxeo 

ED - Annointed Word 
9:00 P.M. 

- Equalizer 

- St, Elsewhere (CC). 

O CD - Arthur Hailey's Hotel (CC). 

CD - Ethics on Trial 



CD - Eyes on the Prize: Awakenings 
1954-1956 (CC). 
CD - White Shadow 
S3 - Novela: El Sol Sale para Todos 
ED - Entertainment Tonight 
ED - Nightly Business Report 
JHBO] - The Hitchhiker (CC). In 
Stereo. 

9:30 P.M. 
- News 
ED - Honeymooners 
ED - John McLaughlin's One on One 
ED - 700 Club 

(HBO) - The Hitchhiker (CC). In 
Stereo. 

9*35 P M 
CD - MOVIE; 'Short Walk to Daylight' 

10:00 P.M. 
O © O O CD - News 
CD - World of Survival 
CD - Nightly Business Report 
CD - Benny Hill Show 
ED - Informacion 26 
ED - Late Show: Starring Joan Riv- 
ers 

ED - Hatha Yoga 

[HBO] - MOVIE: 'Jewel of the Nile' 
(CC) In Stereo. 

[ESPN] - America's Cup Challenge 
Downunder The Final Four 

10:25 P.M. 
CD - American Playhouse: All My 
Sons (CC). 

10:30 P.M. 
- Adderly 
O - Magnum, P.I. 
- Tonight Show In Stereo. 
- Barney Milter 
O - ABC News Nightline (CC). 
CD - Centennial 
CD - M»A"S*H 

CD - Tonight Show 

ED - Novela: El Hijo de Angela Maria 

ED - We're Cooking Now 

ED - 700 Club 

11:00 P.M. 

- Hart to Hart 

O - MOVIE: 'Holocaust' Part 3. 

CD - Odd Couple 

ED - Cinema 26 

ED - Sanford and Son 

ED - People, Pets & Dr. Marc 




MIAMI VICE 



Detective Crockett (Don 
Johnson) is at a disadvantage 
during a swank party where 
he poses as a drug dealer and 
gels mixed up with a Cuban 
paramilitary group, in the 
"Cuba Libre" episode of "Mi- 
ami Vice." It airs FRIDAY, 
JAN. 23, on CTV. 

CHECK LISTINGS FOR EXACT TIME 
(c) 1987 CompulOQ 



MAGNUM, P.I. 



Passing himsell off as Thom- 
as Magnum. Mac (guest star 
Jeff MacKay), a dead ringer 
for Magnum's deceased Navy 
buddy, finds himself in a bat- 
tle with a consortium of gang- 
sters that eventually involves 
more than wits. "Magnum, 
P.I." airs WEDNESDAY, JAN. 
21, on CTV. 

CHECK LISTINGS FOR EXACT TIME 
(c) 1987 Comptiloq 





Repertory Company 

Square One TV, a new television series developed by variety of mathematical concepts throuqh parodies of 



the Children's Television Workshop, the creators of 
Sesame Street and The Electric Company, will 
premiere on the nation's more than 200 public 
television stations in January. Designed for viewers 
between eight and 12, the show will introduce a 



commercials, soap operas, game shows, music videos 
and other familiar TV formats. The cast members are, 
from left, Arthur Howard, Cynthia Darlow, Reg. E. 
Cathey, Cristobal Franco, Luisa Leschin, Larry Cedar 
and Beverly Mickins. 




6C Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



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THURSDAY 
1/15/87 




12:30 P.M. 

Come Back Little Sheba' A 

iddle-aged couple's pent-up frus- 

ations surface when they take In a 

oed tenant. Shirley Booth, Burt Lan- 

aster. Terry Moore. 1953. . 

1:00 P.M. 
HBO] - 'Tender Mercies' An ex- 
ountry-and-western singer tries to 
tart a new lite but his past catches 
p with him. Robert Duvall, Tess Har- 
er. Betty Buckley. 1982. Rated PG. 

4:00 P.M. 
tHBO] - 'Wildrose* A young woman 
iner learns that she needs more 
han muscle to cope with her job. Lisa 
ichorn. 

6:00 P.M. 

'Smash-Up' A famous singer 

arries a struggling composer who 

venlually becomes famous. Lee 

owman. Susan Hayward, Eddie Al- 

rt. 1947. 

6:30 P.M. 
HBO] - 'Once Bitten 1 (CC) A gor- 
eous vampire must have the blood 
I young males to stay eternally 
young. Lauren Hulton, Jim Carrey, 
aren Kopins. 1985. Rated PG. 

7:00 P.M. 

- "The Legend of Lizzie Borden' 
The story ol the notorious New Eng- 
land spinster accused of the axe mur- 

ers ol her father and stepmother. 
iizabeth Montgomery, Fritz Weaver, 
Iherine Helmond. 1975. 

'Marathon Man' A graduate 
tudent finds himself at the mercy of 
fugitive Nazi war criminal. Duslin 
oilman, Lawrence Olivier, Roy 
hetder. 1976. 

7:05 P.M. 

- 'Coogan's Bluff An Arizona de- 
uty sheriff applies the rough tactics 
f the frontier when he arrives in New 

^York to extradite an escaped mur- 
derer. Clint Eastwood, Lee J, Cobb, 
Susan Clark. 1968. 

8:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Act of Vengeance' (CC) 
Joseph Yablonski's challenge ol cor- 
rupt union president Tony Boyle for. 
leadership of the United Mine Work- 
ers culminates in tragedy. Charles 
Bronson, Ellen Burstyn. Wilford Brim- 
ley. 1986. In Stereo. 

9:05 P.M. 
CD - 'Fort Worth' A famous gunfigh* 
ter decides to battle frontier lawless- 
ness via the town's newspaper. 
Randolph Scott. David Brian. Phyllis 
Thsxter. 1951. 

11:00 P.M. 

- 'Stalk the Wild Child' A behav- 
ioral psychologist attempts tocivilizo 
a boy who was abandoned tn the wild- 
erness as a small child. Oavid Jans- 
sen, Trish,Van Devere, Joseph Bot- 
toms, 1976. 

1 HBO] - 'The New Kids* (CC) When 
wo orphaned teenagers move to a 
ew town, they become the target for 
he local gang. Shannon Presby, Lon 
oughlin. 1985. Rated R. 

11:30 P.M. 

- 'Red Line 7000* Three young 

embers ol a stock car racing team 

rid the women they love relied the 

ension and unpredictability of lie 

cmg world. James Caan. Laura Do- 
on. 1965. 

11:40 P.M. 

- 'The Last Survivors* Twenty- 
ve people, jammed in a nearly- 

amped boat, must decide who is to 
sacrificed so that the majority can 
urvive. Martin Sheen, Diane Bak.r, 
om Bosley. 1975. ' 
- 11:50 P.M. 
'Days of Wine and Roses' 
a public relations man and his 
become alcoholics, only he 
eks help. Jack Lemmon, Lee Re- 
ick. 1963. 

1 2:35 A.M. 
BO] - 'Almost You' (CC) A man 
Ifering from the strains of daily life 
ds himself attracted to his wife's 
ysical therapist. Brooke Adams, 
ilfin Dunne, Karen Young. 1984. 
jted R. 

2:00 A.M. 

- 'The Falcon in Mexico' A man- 
l lor a dangerous killer takes our 
o to Mexico. Tom Conway, Mona 
ris, Nestor Paiva.-1944. 

FRIDAY 
1/16/87 



be Iree, Bill Kerr. Noel Trevarthen. 
1983. 

3:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Welcome Home' Arline 
Judge, James Dunn. 1935. 

4:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'The Philadelphia Expert- 
ment' (CC) In 1943, a top secret ra- 
dar test aboard a naval destroyer 
goes haywire and two sailors are pro- 
pelled, via a lime-warp, into a similar 
experiment taking place in 1984. Mi- 
chael Pare, Nancy Allen, Bobby Di- 
Cicco. 1984, Rated PG. 

7:00 P.M. 
O - 'Fantastic Voyage' A super- 
secret organization is called in to 
shrink people to microbe size to re- 
pair the brain of a lamous scientist. 
Stephen Boyd. Edmond O'Brien, Ra- 
quel Welch. 1966, 

GD - 'The Black Stallion' A mystical 
relationship is formed between a boy 
and a horse when they are ship- 
wrecked on a deserted island. Mickey 
Rooney. Kelly Reno, Teri Garr. 1979. ' 
© - 'The Sign of Zorro' The masked 
bandit must expose an impostor out 
to discredit him, Guy Williams, Henry 
Calvin. Gene Sheldon. I960. 
[HBO] - 'Chorus Line: The Movie 1 
(CC) Young dancers auditioning for a 
musical, seek fame and stardom. Mi- 
chael Douglas. Audrey Landers. 
1985. Rated PG-13. In Stereo. 
8:00 P.M. 

O - 'An American Harvest' 
When economic and weather condi- 
tions force a Kansas wheat farmer to 
give up his (and, he must resort to 
private contracting to survive. Wayne 
Rogers, Earl Holliman, Fredric Lehne. 
1987. 

9:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Jewel of the Nile' (CC) 
Novelist Joan Wilder and adventurer 
Jack Colton race against an evil Mid- 
dle Eastern leader in pursuit of a fa- 
bulous jewel, Kathleen "Turner. Mi- 
chael Douglas, Danny DeVito. 1985. 
Rated PG-13, In Stereo. 

10:30 P.M. 
CD - 'Code of Scotland Yard' A 
crook escapes from Devil's Island. 
Diana Dors, Oscar Homolka. 1948. 

11:00 P.M. 
O - 'Devil's Own' An English private 
school is the scene of witchcraft, hu- 
man sacrifices and voodoo rites. 
Joan Fontaine. Kay Walsh. Alec 
McGowen. 1967. 

. 11:20 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Private Resort' Hector Eli- 
zondo, Dody Goodman, Leslie Easter- 
brook. 1985. Rated R. 

11:30 P.M. 
O - 'The Legend of Hell House' A 
gripping story of occult phenomena 
unfolds when four researchers agree 
to spend a week in a haunted house, 
Roddy McDowall, Pamela Franklin, 
Peter Bowles. 1973. 

1:10 A.M. 
Q - 'To Be Announced' 

1:45 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Assault on Precinct 13' 
Cops and cons join forces as a teen- 
age gang lays siege to a police sta- 
tion. Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston. 
Laurie Zimmer, 1976. Rated R. 

2:00 A.M. 
O - 'Falcon in Hollywood' Mystery 
invades Hollywood when a matinee 
idol is killed. Tom Conway, Rita Cor- 
day, Barbara Hale. 1944. 

SATURDAY 
1/17/87 



odies of 
c videos 
ers are, 
Reg. E. 
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12:30 P.M. 

- 'The Love God?* A man cons 

meek publisher of a nature ma-. 

me into leaving the country, then 

Ins the magazine into a girlie jour- 

. Don Knotts, Anne Francis, Ed- 

nd O'Brien. 1969. 

2:00 P.M. 
BO] - 'Dusty' An elderly shee- 
rer must choose between love 
is dog and the animal's desire to 



5:00 A.M. 
[HBO] - "Blue Line' A shy eighteen- 
year-old boy's chance for glory is 
threatened by his summer love. 

6:00 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'BMX Bandits' A trio ol 
teenage bikers take on a gang of 
crooks. David Argue, John Ley. 
1984. Rated PG. 

7:30 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Troll' A troll living in a San 
Francisco apartment puts a plan in 
motion to take over the world. Mi- 
chael Moriarty. Shelley Hack, June 
Lockhart. 1986. Rated PG-13. In 
Stereo. 

8:30 A.M. 
€D - 'Blondie Meets the Boss" When 
Dagwood loses his job, Blondie takes 
his place at the office. Penny Single- 
ton, Arthur Lake. Jonathan Hale. 
1939. 

10:00 A.M. 
CD - 'Mutiny on the Bounty* The 
crew mutinies against tyrannical 
Captain Bligh on a worldwide sea voy- 
age. Clark Gable, Charles Laughlon, 
Franchot Tone. 1935. 
CD - 'Springfield Rifle 1 A court- 
martialed Army major goes under- 
cover to unmask the head of an out- 
jaw band stealing Army rifles. Gary 
Cooper, Phyllis Thaxter, David Brian. 
1952. 



[HBO] -'National Lampoon's Euro- 
pean Vacation' The Griswold family 
takes Europe by storm when they win 
an all-expenses-paid trip on a game 
show. Chevy Chase, Beverly D'An- 
gelo, Eric Idle. 1985, 

11:30 A.M, 
- 'Arrow in the Dust' A deserter 
from the cavalry assumes the ident- 
ity of a dead commander. Sterling 
Hayden, Coleen Gray, Keith Larson, 
1954. 

[HBO]-- 'Mommie Dearest' Joan 
Crawford's real lile role is revealed as 
seen through the eyes ol her daugh- 
ter. Faye Dunaway, Steve Forrest, 
Diana Scarwid. 1981. Rated PG. 

12:00 P.M. 
€0 - 'Of Human Bondage' A club- 
footed young medical student be- 
comes infatuated with a promis- 
cuous woman. Leslie Howard, Bette 
Davis, Frances Dee. 1934. 

12:45 P.M. 
CD - 'Johnny Eager' A student of 
sociology falls for a gang leader. Rob- 
ert Taylor, Lana Turner, Van Hellin. 
1942. 

1:00 P.M. 
CD - 'Requiem for a Falling Star* An 
aging actress mysteriously chooses 
to live in a cottage on a studio lot, 
where she plots against a gossip col- 
umnist. Peter Falk, Anne Baxter. 
1973. 

1:30 P.M. 
- 'Tarzan and the Huntress' Tar- 
zan opposes the efforts of a zoologi- 
cal expedition intent on capturing 
scores of animals lor various zoos. 
Johnny Weissmuller, Brenda Jc-yce, 
Johnny Sheffield. 1947. 

1:45 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'A View to a Kill' (CC) 
James Bond hunts a maniac attempt- 
ing to take over (he world. Roger 
Moore, Grace Jones, Christopher 
Walken. 1985. Rated PG. In Stereo. 

2:30 P.M. 
O -'The Sign of Zorro' The masked 
bandit must expose an imposter out 
to discredit him. Guy Williams, Henry 
Calvin, Gene Sheldon. 1960. 

4:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Watership Down' Based 
on Richard Adams' novel. Coura- 
geous rabbits try to build a new fu- 
ture for themselves when the forces 
of progress drive them out of their 
home. 1978. Rated PG. 

5:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Troll* A'troll living in a San 
Francisco apartment puts a plan in 
motion to take over the world. Mi- 
chael Moriarty, Shelley Hack, June 
Lockhart. 1986. Rated PG-13. In 
Stereo. 

7:00 P.M. 
CD - 'The Burglars' Jewel thieves 
find their successful robbery compli- 
cated by a beautiful model, a crooked 
cop and a ship stuck in a Mediterra- 
nean port. Jean-Paul Belmondo, 
Omar Sharif, Dyan Cannon. 1973. 
© - 'Rider on the Rain' A man and a 
woman are pitted against each other 
in the intrigues of a murder case. 
Charles Bronson, Marlene Jobert, An- 
nie Cordy. 1970. 

[HBO] - 'National Lampoon's Euro- 
pean Vacation' The Griswold family 
takes Europe by storm when they win 
an all-expenses-paid trip on a game 
show. Chevy Chase, Beverly D'An- 
gelo, Eric Idle- 1985. 

7:05 P.M. 
CD - 'The Man From Laramie' A 
man sets out to avenge his brother's 
death and runs up against a cang 
running guns to the Indians. James 
Stewart, Arthur Kennedy, Donald 
Crisp. 1955. 

8:00 P.M. 
O - 'Sister Margaret and the 
Saturday Night Ladles' (CC) A head- 
strong nun is determined to start a 
halfway house for wornc eaving pri- 
son on parole. Bonnie F' tnklin, Rose- 
mary Clooney, Jeant.:a Arnette. 
. 1986. 

10:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Cease Fire' When a Viet- 
nam veteran's horrid past begins to 
haunt him and ruin his life he tries to 
pull his life together by : '.-eking help 
from a local Veteran's Center. Don 
Johnson, Lisa Blount. 1 985. Rated R. 

10:30 P.M. 
- Ice Station Zebra' A nuclear 
submarine crew races with the Rus- 
sians to find a piece of film from a 
Russslan satellite. Rock Hudson, Er- 
nest Borgnine, Patrick McGoohan. 
1968. 

- 'Sands of I wo Jima' An officer's 
son has no liking for the traditions of 
the Marine Corps but under the 
stress of battle, a tough sergeant 
makes him see otherwise. John 
Wayne, John' Agar, Adele Mara. 
1949. 

QD - 'Frankenstein Must Be Des- 
troyed' An evil doctor uses his asso- 



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date's brain in a transplant opera- 
tion. Peter Cushing, Simon Ward, 
Veronica Carlson, 1970. 
11:00 P.M. 
- 'To Be Announced' 

11:30 P.M. 
€0 - 'Jinxedl' A blackjack dealer 
and a nightclub singer plot to kill her 
gambling boyfriend. Bette Midler, Rip 
Torn, Ken Wahl. 1982. 
11:40 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'A View to a Kill' (CC) 
James Bond hunts a maniac attempt- 
ing to take over the world. Roger 
Moore, Grace Jones, Christopher 
Walken, 1985. Rated PG. In Stereo. 

12:20 A.M. 
CD - 'Design for Scandal' A newspa- 
perman sets out to smear the name 
of a respectable lady judge. Walter 
Pidgeon. Rosalind Russell. 1941. 

1:00 A.M. 
- 'Cyrano de Bergerac' A Pari- 
sian, blessed with a gift for poetry 
and a swift sword, battles wrongdo- 
ing while helping a friend woo a beau- 
tiful woman whom he himself loves. 
Jose Ferrer, Mala Powers. 1950. 

1:25 A.M. 
- 'Apache' A battle between the 
Indians and the U.S. Cavalry erupts. 
Burt Lancaster, Jean Peters, John 
Mclntire. 1954. 

1:30 A.M. 

CD - 'Exorcist II: The Heretic' 

Haunted by visions and dreams of 
flying, Regan becomes a link between 
science and religion. Richard Burton, 
Linda Blair Louise Fletcher. 1977. 

1:55 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Creepshow' Five episodes 
each depict different kinds ot horror. 
Adrienne Barbeau, Hal Holbrook, 
E.G. Marshall. 1982. Rated R. In 
Stereo. 

SUNDAY 
1/J8/87 

5:45 A.M. 
CD - 'Emperor of the North Pole' A 
railroad bum and a train guard carry 
on a personal war when total free- 
dom clashes with unbendable rules. 
Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Keith 
Carradine. 1973. 

7:00 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Sesame Street Presents: 
Follow That Bird' (CC) Big Bird has 
flown the coop and it's up to his 
friends to get him. Voices of: Jim 
Henson, Carroll Spinney, 1985. 
Rated G. In Stereo. 

9:30 A.M. 
[HBO] -'Murphy's Romance" (CC) 
An easy-going widower falls for the 
new young woman in town. Sally - 
Field, James Garner, Brian Kerwin. 
1985. Rated PG-13. 

9:35 A.M. 

CD - 'Northwest Passage' An expe- 
dition searches for the mythical Nor- 
thwest passage, Spencer Tracy, Rob- 
ert Young. Ruth Hussey. 1940. 

11:00 A.M. 
ED - 'Broadway Melody of 1940' A 
Broadway dancing team split up 
when success breaks for only one of 



them. Fred Astaire, Eleanor Powell, 
George Murphy. 1940. 

11:30 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Once Bitten' (CC) A gor- 
geous vampire must have the blood 
of young males to stay eternally 
young. Lauren Hutton, Jim Carrey, 
Karen Kopins. 1985. Rated PG. 

12:00 P.M. 
- 'Charlie Chan' in the City of 
Darkness' Supernatural events lead 
Chan into a maze of murder and for- 
eign intrigue. Sidney Toler, Lynn Bar). 
1939. 

CD - 'The Long Riders' Jesse James, 
Cole Younger and their outlaw bands 
terrorize the old American West. 
Stacy Keach, David Carradine, James 
Keach. 1980. 

© - 'The Sign of Zorro' The masked 
bandit must expose an imposter out 
to discredit him, Guy Williams, Henry 
Calvin, Gene Sheldon. 1960. 

12:15 P.M. 
CD - 'Three Godfathers' Three ban- 
dits come upon a dying mother and a 
child while escaping the law. John 
Wayne, Ward Bond, Pedro Armen- 
dariz. 1949. 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Iron Eagle' (CC) A young 
boy attempts a daring rescue of his 
father who has been taken hostage 
by an Arab government. Jason Ged- 
rick, Louis Gossett, Tim Thomerson. 
1986. Rated PG-13. In Stereo. 

1:30 P.M. 
- 'Superbug: Super Agent' The 
bug, a car, is a flying Super Agent out 
to bug the bad guys. Robert Mark, 
Heidi Hansen, George Goodman. 
1976. 

2:00 P.M. 

CD - 'Footlight Parade' A musical 
comedy director fights a variety ol 
difficulties to become a big-time 
producer. James Cagney, Joan Blon- 
dell, Dick Powell. 1933. 
CD - 'Murphy's War' A WWII Irish- 
man who, after the massacre of the 
crew of his ship by a German U-Boat, 
seeks revenge .at all costs. Peter 
OToole, Sian Phillips, Philippe 
Nolret. 1971. 

© - 'The Four Feathers' A young 
aristocrat resigns his commission on 
the eve of an expedition to the Sudan 
and is branded a coward. John Cle- 
ments, Ralph Richardson. June Du- 
prez. 1939. 

2:20 P.M. 

CD - 'Conflict' A man murders his 
wife because he's in love with her sis- 
ter, then plays cat and mouse with 
the police to protect his alibi. Hum- 
phrey Bogart, Alexis Smith, Sydney 
Greenstreet. 1945. 

2:30 P.M. 
CD - 'Red River' A young man rebels 
against his cattle baron foster lather 
during an important roundup. John 
Wayne, Montgomery Clitt. Walter 
Brcnnan. 1948. 

3:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Shaker Run* A govern- 
ment research scientist recruits two 
race car stuntmen to help her protect 



her biological discovery that the gov- 
ernment wants to use as a warfare 
virus. Cliff Robertson, Leif Garrett. 
3:30 P.M. 



- 'Here Come the Tigers' A team 
of little league misfits struggles to 
gain a winning season for their coach 
who is a rookie cop. Richard Lincoln, 
James Zvanut, Samantha Grey. 
1978. 

4:00 P.M. 
CD - 'O'Hara's Wife' A lawyer's de- 
ceased wife returns as a ghost to 
help him with his overwhelming prob- 
lems. Edward Asner, Mariette Har- 
tley, Jodie Foster. 1982. 
© - 'The Young Lions' This Is a 
powerful story of three young men, 
two Americans and a German, in the 
campaigns of World War II. Marlon 
Brando, Dean Martin, Montgomery 
Clift. 1958. 

5:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'This Is Elvis* Actual foo- 
tage and restaged scenes depict the 
life and career of Elvis Presley. David 
Scott, Johnny Harra. 1981. RatPd 
PG. In Stereo. 

6:00 P.M. 
CD - 'Out on a Limb' (CC) Actress 
Shirley MacLaine engages in a spiri- 
tual adventure that takes her to the 
limits of her being. Shirley MacLaine, 
Charles Dance, John Heard. 1987. 
Part 1 of 2. 

6:30 P.M. 
CD - 'All Creatures Great and Small' 
A veterinarian returns to his home 
town alter World War II to find that all 
is not as it used to be. Christopher 
Timothy. Robert Hardy. 1983. 

7:00 P.M. 
O - 'Out on a Limb' (CC) Actress 
Shirley MacLaine engages in a spiri- 
tual adventure that takes her to the 
limits of her being. Shirley MacLaine, 
Charles Dance, John Heard. 1987. 
Part 1 of 2. 

[HBO] - 'Murphy's Romance* (CC) 
An easy-going widower falls for the 
new young woman in town. Sally 
Field, James Garner, Brian Kerwin, 
1985. Rated PG-13. 

8:00 P.M. 
- 'Warm Hearts, Cold Feet' 
(CC) A young married couple who 
writes for rival Los Angeles newspa- 
pers shares the wife's pregnancy 
with their readers. Tim Matheson, 
Margaret Colin, Elizabeth Ashley. 
1987. 

O - 'Blood Vows: The Story of 
a Mafia Wife' (CC) A naive young 
woman marries a charming lawyer, 
only to discover that his family has 
ties to the underworld. Melissa Gil- 
bert, Joe Penny, Eileen Brennan. 
1987. In Stereo. 

9:00 P.M. 
CD - 'King: Montgomery to Mem- 
phis' Newsreel footage and record- 
ings help to tell the story of Martin 
Luther King's career from the Mont- 
gomery bus boycott to his assassina- 
tion in Memphis in 1968. 1970. 

9:30 P.M. 
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■rsday, January 1 5, 1 987 



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boy attempts a daring rescue ot his 
father who has been taken hostage 
by an Arab government. Jason Ged- 
rick, Louis Gossett, Tim Thomerson. 
1986. Rated PG-13. In Stereo. 

11:00 P.M. 
- 'Crime of Innocence' An ex- 
ploration of the imperfect reform sys- 
tem that allows delinquent youths to 
be jailed and face the risk ol exploita- 
tion in adult prisons. Andy Griffith, 
Diane Ladd. 1985. 

11:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Once Bitten' (CC) A gor- 
geous vampire must have the blood 
of young males to stay eternally 
young. Lauren Hutton. Jim Carrey, 
Karen Kopins. 1985. Rated PG. In 
Stereo. 

12:00 A.M. 

O - 'A Fine Pair 1 A detective be- 
comes the unwitting accomplice of a 
woman planning a jewel heist. Rock 
Hudson, Claudia Cardinale. 1969. 

1:15 A.M. 
0- 'Condemned Women' A female 
prisoner's outlook is changed by a 
doctor's love. Louis Hayward. Ann 
Shirley. Sally Eilers. 1938. 

MONDAY 
1/19/87 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Garbo Talks' (CC) An ec- 
centric middle-aged woman enlists 
the aid ol her son to fulfill her dying 
wish to meet Garbo. Anne Bancroft, 
Ron Silver, Carrie Fisher. 1984. 
Rated PG-13. 

4:30 P.M. 
(HBO] - 'Eddie and the Cruisers' 
Twenty years after the disappear- 
ance ot a band's lead singer, a re- 
porter and the band's lyricist try to 
piece together the mystery. Tom Ber- 
enger. Michael Pare, Ellen Barkin. 
1983. Rated PG. 

■ 7:00 P.M. 
60 - 'Brian's Song' The friendship of 
two professional athletes, Brian Pic- 
colo and Gayle Sayers, is portrayed. 
James Caan, Billy Dee Williams, Shel- 
ley Fabares. 1971. 

[HBO] - 'Long&hot' A 'sure winner' 
plunges a bumbling shoe salesman 
and his buddies into a silly scramble 
for money to place on a bet. Tim Con- 
way, Harvey Korman, Jack Weston. 
1986. Rated PG-13. 

8:00 P.M. 
O © - 'Out on a Limb' (CC) Ac- 
tress Shirley MacLaine engages in a 
spiritual adventure which transports 
her to the limits of her being. Shirley 
MacLaine, Charles Dance, John 
Heard, 1987. Part 2 ot 2. 
m - 'Sahara' A young woman prom- 
ises her dying father that she'll drive 
his last creation in the first Sahara 
International Rally. Brooke Shields, 
Lambert Wilson, Horst Buchholz. 
1984. 

QD - 'To Be Announced' 

9:20 P.M. 
CD - 'The Great Missouri Raid' The 
James and Younger boys ride the 
outlaw trail to escape a Union Army 
major. MacDonald Carey, Wendell 
Corey, Ellen Draw, 1950. 

9:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - Too Scared to Scream' 
Tenants of a swanky apartment 
building are being murdered one by 
one. Mike Connors. Anne Archer. 
1985. Rated R. 

11:00 P.M. 

O - 'Holocaust' A gentle physician 



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and his family are among the victims 
caught in a wave of fanatic anti- 
Semitism marking Hitler's reign of 
terror and the mass annihilation of 
Jews. Michael Moriarty, Fritz Weaver, 
Meryl Streep. 1978. Part 1, 

11:30 P.M. 
O - 'King' The career of Nobel 
Peace Prize-winning civil rights activ- 
ist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., one of 
the prime movers in the desegrega- 
tion process ot the 60's, is drama- 
tized. Paul Winfield, Cecily Tyson, Os- 
sie Davis. 1977. Part 1. 
QD - 'Fathom' A woman parachute 
jumper is hired to recover a piece of 
equipment lost in the Mediterranean. 
Tony Franciosa, Raquel Welch, Ron- 
ald Fraser. 1967. 

11:40 P.M. 
- 'To Be Announced' 

11:45 P.M. 

[HBO] - 'Certain Fury' Two teena- 
gers on the run must stick together 
or be victimized for a crime they 
didn't commit. Tatum O'Neal, Irene 
Cara. 1985. Rated R. 

1:05 A.M. 
CD - 'Fortunes of Captain Blood' An 
Irish doctor, banished to Barbados, 
escapes to become the feared pirate, 
Captain Blood. Louis Hayward, Patri- 
cia Medina, George Macready. 
1950. 

1:15 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'The Breakfast Club* (CC) 
A group of high school students learn 
several things about themselves 
when they are forced to spend a Sa- 
turday together in detention. Emllio 
Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Anthony Mi- 
chael Hall. 1985. Rated R. 

2:00 A.M. 
O - 'Murder on the Blackboard' 
Murder committed in school room of 
pretty teacher; musical notes on 
blackboard are the only clues, Edna 
May Oliver, Bruce Cabot, James 
Gleason. 1934. 

TUESDAY 
1/20/87 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Troll* A troll living in a San 
Francisco apartment puts a plan in 
motion to take over the world. Mi- 
chael Moriarty, Shelley Hack, June 
Lockhart. 1986. Rated PG-13. In 
Stereo. 

3:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - Toby and the Koala Bear 1 
After escaping a convict ship bound 
for Australia, young Toby befriends a 
koala bear. Voice of Rolf Harris. 
1981. 

4:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Home from the Hill' An 
illegitimate son saves his father's life. 
Robert Mitchum, George Peppard, 
Eleanor Parker. 1960. In Stereo. 

7:00 P.M. 
- 'Sahara' A young woman prom- 
ises her dying lather that she'll drive 
his last creation in the first Sahara 
International Rally. Brooke Shields, 
Lambert Wilson, Horst Buchholz. 
1984. 

€D - 'Blrdman of Alcatraz' A convict 
spending 53 years in prison edu- 
cates himself in the science of birds, 
becoming a world authority. Burt 
Lancaster, Karl Matden, Thelma Rit- 
ter. 1962. 

[HBO] - 'The Flamingo Kid' (CC) A 
plumber's son discovers the world ol 
the rich when he spends the summer 
as a cabana boy at a Long Island 



Country Club. Matt Dillon, Richard 
Crenna. Hector Elizondo. 1984. 
Rated PG-13. 

8:00 P.M. 



geous vampire must have the blood 
of young males to stay eternally 
young. Lauren Hutton, Jim Carrey, 
Karen Kopins. 1985. Rated PG. 

7:00 P.M. 
© - 'Days of Heaven' Three teen- 
age migrant farm workers cross 
paths with a wealthy wheat farmer. 
Brooke Adams, Richard Gere. Linda 
Manz. 1978. 

[HBO] -'Stripes' (CC) A recruit has 
his own Ideas about how the New" 
Army should work. Sill Murray, Har- 
old Ramis, Warren Oates. 1981. 
Rated R. 

7:05 P.M. 
(D - 'The Sons of Katie Elder' Four 
brothers return home for their moth- 
er's funeral and unite to avenge her 
death. John Wayne, Dean Martin, 
George Kennedy, 1965. - 

9:35 P.M. 
CD - 'Short Walk to Daylight' An 
earthquake levels New York City and 
traps eight subway passengers un- 
derground. James Brolln. James 
. McEachin, Abbey Lincoln. 1972. 

10:00 P.M. 

[HBO] - 'Jewel of the Nile' (CC) 
Novelist Joan Wilder and adventurer 



ARNOLD'S 

Glen Rock & Washington, Near Downtown Waukegan 

BIG & TALL 



& REGULAR SIZES . 



NAME IT - WE HAVE IT 



SUITS 

SPORTCOATS 

SPORTSHIRTS 



PAJAMAS 
ROBES 



JEANS 

SWEATERS 

OUTERWEAR. 

SHOES, & INSULATED FOOTWEAR 



Jack Col ton race against an evil Mid- 
dle Eastern leader in pursuit of a fa- 
bulous jewel. Kathleen Turner, Mi- 
chael Douglas, Danny DeVito. 1985. 
Rated PG-13. In Stereo. 

11:00 P.M. 
O - 'Holocaust' A gentle physician 
and his family are among the victims 
caught In a wave of fanatic anti- 
Semitism marking Hitler's reign of 
terror and the mass annihilation of 
Jews. Michael Moriarty, Fritz Weaver. 
Meryl Streep. 1978. Part 3. 

11:30 P.M. 
- 'King' The career of Nobel 
Peace Prize-winning civil rights activ- 
ist Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr., one of 
the prime movers in the desegrega- 
tion process of the 60's, is drama- 
tized. Paul Winfield. Cecily Tyson, Os- 
sle Davis. 1977. Part 3. 
CD - "The Laughing Policeman' A 
police detective breaks all the rules 
to find the man who murdered his 
partner and eight other people on a 
San Francisco bus. Walter Matthau. 
Bruce Dera 1973. 

11:35 P.M. 
CD - 'Once You Kiss a Stranger' A 
psychotic girl seduces a goll pro, kills 
his rival, then tries to get him to mur- 



der her psychiatrist. Paul Burke, 
Carol Lynley, Martha Hyer. 1969. 
11:40 P.M. 



I -To Be Announced' 
11:50 P.M..; 
[HBO] -'Murphy's Romance* (CC) 
An easy-going widower falls for the 
new young woman in town. Sally 
Field, James Garner. Brian Kerwin. 
1985. Rated PG-13. 

1:40 A.M. 

[HBO] - 'The Par* Is Mine' (CC) 
One man tries to call the public's at- 
tention to the plight of the Vietnam 
vet by taking Central Park hostage, 
Tommy Lee Jones, Helen Shaver. 
1985. In Stereo. 

1:50 A.M. * 

CD - 'Countdown' This science fic- 
tion adventure offers a before-the- 
fact treatment of the first U.S. moonf- 
lighi. Robert Duval!. James Caan. 
Charles Aidman. 1968. 
2:00 AM. 

O - 'Murder on the Bridle Path' 
When a girl is murdered in Central 
Park, a female sleuth and an Inspec- 
tor work on the case together. Helen 
Broderick. James Gleason. 1936. 



_J -'The Man With Two Brains' 
A world-famous brain surgeon impul- 
sively marries his beautiful patient, a 
scheming temptress. Steve Martin, 
Kathleen Turner, David Warner. 
1983. 

10:00 P.M. 
CD - 'The Viking Queen' A beautiful 
tribal ruler in ancient Britain seeks to 
overthrow the Roman occupation 
forces. Don Murray, Carita, Donald 
Houston. 1967. 

10:30 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Troll* A troll living in a San 
Francisco apartment puts a plan in 
motion to take over the world. Mi- 
chael Moriarty, Shelley Hack, June 
Lockhart. 1986. Rated PG-13. In 
Stereo. 

11:00 P.M. 
O - 'Holocaust' A gentle physician 
and his family are among the victims 
caught in a wave of fanatic anti- 
Semitism marking Hitler's reign of 
terror and the mass annihilation of 
Jews. Michael Moriarty. Fritz Weaver, 
Meryl Streep. 1978. Part 2, 

11:30 P.M. 
O - 'King' The career of Nobel 
Peace Prize-winning civil rights activ- 
ist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., one of 
the prime movers in the desegrega- 
tion process of the 60's, is drama- 
tized. Paul Winfield. Cecily Tyson, Os- 
sie Davis. 1977. Part 2. 
CO - 'Commandos' Some Allied 
commandos must take over a base 
and keep it secure until the rest o! the- 
Allied forces can land there. Lee Van 
Cleef, Jack Kelly. 1972. 
11:40 P.M. 
O - 'To Be Announced' 

12:00 A.M. 
CD - 'Trog' An anthropologist stu- 
dies a troglodyte, a primitive half- 
ape, who is released and goes on a 
rampage. Joan Crawford, Michael 
Gough, David Griffin. 1970. 
[HBO] - 'Re-Animator 1 A deter- 
mined young scientist experiments 
with a secret formula which will suc- 
cessfully revive the dead. Jeffrey 
Combs, Bruce Abbott, Barbara 
Crampton. 1985. Rated NR. 

1:30 A.M. 
[HBO] - 'Almost You' (CC) A man 
suffering from the strains of daily life 
finds himself attracted to hts wife's 
physical therapist. Brooke Adams, 
Griflin Dunne, Karen Young. 1984. 
Rated R. 

2:00 A.M. 
O - 'Murder on a Honeymoon' A 
murder on a seaplane, flying from 
Los Angeles to Catalina Island, is 
solved by an old maid schoolteacher. 
Lola Lane, Edna May Oliver, James 
Gleason. 1935. 

WEDNESDAY 
1/21/87 

1:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Jewel of the Nile 1 (CC) 

Novelist Joan Wilder and adventurer 
Jack Colton race against an evil Mid- 
dle Eastern leader in pursuit of a fa- 
bulous Jewel. Kathleen Turner, Mi- 
chael Douglas, Danny DeVito. 1985. 
Rated PG-13. In Stereo, 

3:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Blue Line* A shy eighteen- 
year-old boy's chance for glory is 
threatened by his summer love. 

5:00 P.M. 
[HBO] - 'Once Bitten' (CC) A gor- 



Bono's 



StYO^j/uC 

© By Lillian Bono ****+****^rV*****¥¥* 

ARIES W% 

(March 21-April 20) 

Keep up with health tips and don't go overboard where food 
fs concerned. You need to keep in shape for the future. A 
good friend will be in touch regarding money. 

TAURUS - . <fft 

(April 21-May 20) 

Your finances are In for a change. Persuade someone to give 
you a helping hand where money is concerned. Do the best 
you can for the time being. 

GEMINI 4W 

(May 21-June 20) 

A friend in need is a friend Indeed. Be on the giving end of a 
relationship for a change. Surprise gifts are in store from one 
who Is rarely heard from. 

CANCER . HB6 

(June 21-July 22) 

Surprises are in store, of the romantic kind, so be prepared 
for a whirlwind romance this week. If you are attached, ex- 
pect a change lor Hie better in your relationship. 

klQ « 

(July 23-Aug. 22) 

You may be blinded to someone's devotion. Look at life from 
another's point of view before making a decision on some- 
thing Important. 

VIRGO &$ 

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22) 

Your desire for privacy may be denied for a while longer," Be 
on your toes where gossip is concerned. You could be ask- 
ing for trouble if you get Involved with a situation. 

LIBRA £fo 

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22) 

A romance could hurt your reputation and a chance to suc- 
ceed business-wise. Be optimistic about the future when you 
are faced with terrible odds. 
SCORPIO Gflg 

(Oct. 23-Nov. 22) 

A new love is about to enter your life without warning. You 
will be amazed at how wonderful life can be with someone 
you can share all your ideas with. 

SAGITTARIUS #3 

(Nov. 23-Dec. 21) 

If you are ready for a change, now is the time to get on with 
your life. You could be facing an important decision con- 
cerning one who has been devoted to you. 

CAPRICORN ^ 

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19) 

Secret feuds are about to erupt for the better. Bring things 
out Into the open at work; otherwise you could be looking for 
a new job. 

AQUARIUS ^ 

(Jan. 20-Feb. 1B) 

While visiting this week, you may want to share good will with 

those less forlunate. 

pisces 35; 

(Feb. 19-March 20) 

A return to norm Is the theme this week. You will sign for 
something important to your welt-being and that may be a 
document freeing you Irom a past obligation. 

© 1967 Compulog 




LANDMARK 

LIQUORS 



^ 



Old Fashioned Or 

Creamy Cole Slaw. ....... .79* Lb. 

Boiled Ham. *|,09 - Vi Lb. 

Swiss Cheese «i,69 ■ % Lb. 

BOB and BOB 

Proprietors 

Rts. 83 & 120 223-SUDS 

FRESH BAKERY GOODS 



Com 

I Despil 

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8C Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January i 5, 1 987 



'T™ l ' WiW%ll *^ c w , '«^^ 



MWMTOXWO^O^tjaws^j^a^jQ^ 



■MypMtU " ■■ ■ 



Business 



Consumers Fear Not. Oil Prices To Stabilize 



Consumers and business owners: Kear noi. 
| Despite recent rises in the price of oil, 
{worries about oil-fired inflation are un- 
founded. 

For one thing, OPEC has been given too 
much credit for the slight price increases; 
OPEC no longer has the strangelhold on the 
market that it once had. The oil-producing 
sectors of most industrialized countries have 
supported the current price rise, putting 
nearly everyone in the act. In fact, the price 



of oil from the OPEC states is now stable, 
while the price of U.S. oil is increasing. 

OPEC's agreements to cut production by 
more than seven percent this month is 
tentative at best. Even if quotas are adhered 
to in principle, industry analysts suspect that 
some OPEC members might cheat and 
produce more oil than they agreed, in order 
to garner extra cash. 

Increased production from the 
duslriaiized -countries, resulting from 



the 



Tax Reform Takes Bite Out 
Of Second Home Rentals 



The Meyers 
Report 




by GARY S. MEYERS 

If you are a real-estate in* 
vestor who is planning to 
rent out your cabin in the 
mountains or your condo on 
the beach in 1987, tax reform 
may be sending you an 
avalanche-or a tidal wave- 
depending on your location. 

"Tax reform will be a bur- 
den for owners and would-be 
buyers of vacation proper- 
ties," said Elliott Hechtman, 
president of Holiday Con- 
dominiums, a national 
clearinghouse for resort 
proerty sales and rentals. 

Tax experts say that the 
new tax law will have little 
effect on people who pur- 
chase a vacation home 
primarlily for their own use, 
because the key deductions 
for mortgage interest and 
real-estate taxes on second 
residences are still intact. 
However, investors who pur- 
chase a second home and 
choose to rent it out for part 
of the year may feel the bite 
of higher taxes, depending 
on their Income and the 
amount of deductible losses 
they claim. 

"The tax breaks are gone 
for wealthier second-home 
buyers," said Merlin Widick, 
president of Cun- 
ningham/VYidick Realty In- 
vestor Services Co., a 
Telluride, Colo., develop- 
ment firm. " 

The key change in the law 
affects so-called "passive in- 



1 

1 

V/gj 






Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 



OS 



5,1987 



vestors," phasing out 
provisions that had per- 
mitted upper-bracket tax- 
payers to write off main- 
tenance, depreciation and 
other expenses associated 
with real proeprty. 

Under tax rules, most 
owners of vacation property 
who rent their units are 
classified as "passive in- 
vestors"-meaning they are 
not involved on a regular, 
continuous and substantial 
basis in the management of 
their property. 

Tax reform says that 
passive investors may not 
deduct losses from real 
estate (or other properties) 
against other income, such 
as salary, interest, dividends 
and active business income. 
Under the old rules, such 
deductions were the cor- 
nerstone of most tax 
shelters-enterprises design- 
ed to "lose money" on paper, 
enabling the investor to 
write off a large amount of 
his actual, "active" income. 
These rules can penalize not 
only direct owners of 
vacation property, but also 
time-share owners and those 
who own properties in rental 
pools. 

However, there is at least 
one loophole left for second- 
home owners under tax 
reform. Those who earn 
$100,000 or less a year can 
rent out their residences and 
write off up to $25,000 in, an- 



Business Briefs 



Join Leaders Club 

Two loan officers of the Cary branch of Margaretten and 
Co. were named to the company's 1986 Leaders Club for 
outstanding performance in the origination of mortgages for 
home buyers. They are Robert Zaun of Mundelein, branch 
manager, and Sandra Riechcrt of Schaumburg. Members of 
the Leaders Club were honored by the company at a con- 
ference in Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Coldwell Banker Makes Donation 

Coldwell Banker Chicago-Milwaukee Residential Real 
Estate's first company-wide United Way/Crusade of Mercy 
fundraising effort resulted in a donation of $14,600 to aid 
humanitarian and community services, Staff members 
throughout the 68 residential sales offices in metropolitan 
Chicago and Milwaukee areas and in the Oak Brook cor- 
porate headquarters contributed $10,400, with an additional 
$4,000 provided by the Coldwell Banker company. 



[Offer Scholarships 

Roosevelt University is offering three hours of paid tuition 
or a graduate level public administration course to persons 
vith a high academic standing, financial need and com- 
nitment to public service. The tuition assistance program 
aids mid-career individuals seeking advancement in local 
Sovemment administration and management. The Roosevelt 
program is a cooperative effort with the newly established 
Mary M. Taylor Fund, named after the late Des Plaines chief 
administrative officer. Applications or nominations must be 
Accompanied by an employment resume, transcripts from 
[he most recently attended university and a 300-word essay 
describing the person's qualifications. This should be sent to 
^ter than Feb. 10 to: Hank Rubin, Director of Public Ad- 
ministration Program, Roosevelt University, 430 S. Michigan 
We., Chicago 60605. For more information call (312) 341- 
744. 



[hursday, January 15, 1987 



nual losses-but only if they 
actively participate in the 
leasing and management of 
the dwelling. If you earn 
more than $100,000 annually, 
the $25,000 loss allowance is 
reduced by 50 percent of any 
income over the _ $100,000 
mark. 

For example, if you earn 
$120,000-$20,000 over the in- 
come limit-your loss 
allowance would be cut from 
$25,000 to $15,000. Second- 
home owners who earn mroe 
than $150,000 a year will not 
be able to take any losses. 

To ease the pain f o the new 
rules on passive-investment 
write-offs, those who owned 
property before the new law 
was enacted will get a phase- 
in period. Regardless of 
other limitations in the law, 
those with such property will 
be allowed to take at least 65 
percent of any possible loss 
against active income in 
1987; 40 percent in 1988; 20 
percent in 1989; and 10 per- 
cent in 1990. The write-off 
limitations will take full ef- 
fect in 1991. 

Investors who plan to rent 
their second homes also will 
be affected by a new, longer 
depreciation schedule. In- 
vestors in residential real 
estate—defined partly as 
properties rented for 30 days 
at a time or longer-will be 
required to depreciate their 
property on a 27Vfe-year 
schedule, instead of the 
current 19-year schedule. 
Owners of some properties 
rented for periods of less 
than 30 days will have to 
depreciate on a 3lVfe-year 
basis; this is the same period 
allowed under the old law. 



I 



Economic forecaster Gary S. Meyers has 
been a lecturer and consultant to major 
financial Institutions government analysts, 
real estate developers and daily newspapers 
throughout the nation for the past 16 years. 
Readers are invited to submit comments and 
questions for possible use as subjects for 
future columns. Write Gary S. Meyers & 
Associates. Ltd., 20 W. Hubbard, Chicago, IL 
60610. 



price hikes, should help keep the supply up 
and prices under control. For this reason, the 
price of oil and other energy sources should 
remain generally stable for the next three to 
five years. 

If oil settles at $18 a barrel-its ap- 
proximate current level-exploration will 
continue, bolstering both oil reserves and the 
economies of the oil-producing states. 

Due to the present price increases, we can 
look forward to slightly higher gasoline and 
heating oil prices this winter. However, it 
will still be about 35 percent cheaper to heat 
your home this winter than it was last year. * 

The week in review. 

Investments: Interest rates on the trading 
markets are already recovering from their 
last-week-of-the-year jumps. By Jan. 6, 
yields on Treasury instruments were back to 
where they were before Christmas. The average 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage 

Interest rates on savings certificates at the was up this week, to 9.46 percent, from 9.44 
nation's banks and savings and loan percent last week. Interest rates on 15-year, 
associations moved slightly higher or fixed loans rose to 9.15 percent from 9.14 
showed no movement this week. percent last week. 

Approximately four percent of the in- Of the lenders surveyed, 13 percent raised 
stitutions polled raised their six-month CD their rates on the 30-year, fixed-rate loan; 
yields, and four percent lowered yields. (The only two percent posted declines. 



pricing committees of the rest must have 
been on vacation.) 

On five-year CDs, nine percent of the in- 
stitutions lowered their rates, and one 
percent hiked rates. 

Loans: Lenders are anticipating a flood of 
mortgage applications, as the February 
home-buying season nears. As a result, 
mortgage interest rates edged upward. 



Auto loan rates were up as well. The 
nationwide average for a 48-month new car 
loan was 10.82 percent, up from 10.81 per- 
cent. Two percent of the lenders polled 
raised their rates; an equal number lowered 
them. 

Home improvement loans declined, with a 
national average of 12.76 percent, down from 
12.79 percent lastweek. 



Rate 

$10.72 
share 

5.63% 



$33.56 



6.57% 



January 9, 1987 The GteBt RBCe 



$971.97 



$1001.04 






Over The Counter Stock 



-■" 



Money Market Funds 



:•:;::.',"•:. 



SS2SBB 



$986.05 D yA 



Upper 
Mutual Funds 



$1001.26 



5.53% 


Ei] 


$402.60 
oz. 


■rrj 


$5.40 
oz 




10.11% 




$66.45 
share 


K', '! 



S3SS 



$1001.09 



3= 



$983.70 






3 1/2-Year CD 



90-Day T-Bill 



Gold 



Silver 




Corporate 

Bonds 



,.$900 



51,000 



Blue Chip 
Stock 
fc $1,100 



.$1,200 



Present value of $1,000 investment made January 1, 1987 (updated weekly) 

© 1987 The Meyers Report - Chicago, III. 



THINKING ABOUT...,. 

"STARTING A NEW BUSINESS"? 

then this is for YOU ! A four-part 
workshop at College of Lake 
County on what you should know 
before "Starting A New 
Business". 

Sessions on January 20, 22, 27, 29, 

6:00-9:30 p.m. Grayslake campus. 

Fee $55. CON 101-011 

Register at CLC Grayslake. 

For information call: 

(312)223-3615 

Sponsored by Center for 
Economic Development and Small 
Business Development Committee 



"H&lR Block finds 
more Americans 



m 



— Henry Block 



At H&R Block wc know 
you're concerned about the 
most sweeping tax law 
changes in history. This year 
put us on your side. We're 
pledged to find you the biggest 
refund you're entitled to. 



H&R BLOCK 



THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE 

WHAT CAN WE FIND FOR YOU? 
Antioch Fox Lake 

961 N. Main St. (Rt. 83) We've Moved 

(312) 395-6230 208 S * Rt - 12 

(312)587-9333 

Wauconda 

123 N. Main St. 
(312) 526-8877 



Round Lake 

629 W. Rollins Rd. 
(312)546-4862 



Open Weekdays 9 a.m. -8 p.m. 

Saturdays 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Appointments Available All Locations. 

Mastercard, Visa & Discover Accepted At Most Locations 






Lakeland Newspapers 7B 



tirwuinr.ii. » 



MMBOBBI 



T" 1 

i 



i> 



C 



Business 



Premier Merges With Michigan Group 



Affiliation of the Premier 
banking group of northern 
Illinois with a Michigan 
holding company will be lit- 
tle noticed by the public on a 
day-to-day basis. 

Premier is a six-bank con- 
cern serving Lake and nor- 
thern Cook counties with 16 
offices. 

The Michigan institution is 
First of America Bank Corp. 
of Kalamazoo which now has 
more than $7.4 billion in 
assets and is providing 
financial services to 183 



communities through 45 
banks and a total of 347 of- 
fices in Michigan, Indiana - 
and Illinois. 

Premier includes Liber- 
tyville National Bank with 
four offices; Golf Mill State 
Bank of Niles with two of- 
fices; Grayslake National 
Bank with four offices; First' 
National Bank of Mundelein 
with two offices; Premier 
Bank of Vernon Hills with 
two offices, and the Zion 
State Bank and Trust Co. 
with two offices. 




Lowell M. Hall 



David C. Jefferies 



Larry L. McGregor, chair- local communities." 
man of Premier Bank- .First of American is 
corporation Incl, headquar- paying Premier 

shareholders the equivalent 
of $190 per share in Series F 



tered in Libertyville, stated 

"Our directors and 
management team are par- 
ticularly pleased with the 
First of America affiliation 
because of the similarity in 
service philosophy the two 
bank groups share. The 
banks thrive on servicing 
well the customers in their 



nine percent Convertible 
Preferred stock or cash (up 
to a maximum of 49 per- 
cent). The merger involves a 
total price of $76 million for 
the 400,000 outstanding 
shares of Premier common 
stock. 



CLC Offers Course 
For Enterpreneurs 



Interested in starting your 
own business? The Lake 
County Small Business 
Development Program can 
help you make your move 
with a new program called 
"Starting a New Business." 
The program, created by the 
College of Lake County and 
the Lake County Economic 
Development Commission, 
is designed to give potential 
business owners essential 
management skills. 

Courses in the "Starting a 
New Business" program 
(CON-101-011) will be held 
Jan. 20, 22, 27 and 29 on 
CLC's Grayslake campus. 
Among the issues to be 



examined in the program 
are: what it's like to be a 
business owner; how to 
acquire resources; 
organization, operation and 
legal responsibility; selling 
an idea to investors and 
lenders and surviving a 
business start-up. The 
program will also help you 
determine start-up costs and 
design your business plan. 

No grades, transcripts or 
tests are required for ad- 
mission tot he program. The 
course fee is $55. Call 
(312)360-6350 or (312)223-3015 
for registration and in- 
formation. 



Appoints Hall Marketing VP 

Richard A. Samuels, president or Home Federal Savings 
and Loan Assn. or Lake County, Waukegan, has announced 
the appointment or Lowell M. Hall as vice president of 
marketing for the association. Hall brings with him over 25 
years of experience in the financial field which includes: vice 
president of marketing for the Bank of Elmhurst; 13 years 
with First National Bank of Cicero, and positions with First 
Illinois Bank, Evanston, and Northern Trust Co. of Chicago. 
Hall holds a bachelor of science degree in speech com- 
munications from Northwestern University in Evanston. He 
lives in the Sauganash section of Chicago's far north side 
with his wife, May, and their two sons. 

Receives New Position 

David C. Jefferies has been named to the newly created 
position of executive director of The Clara Abbott Foun- 
dation. Announcing the appointment, Foundation President 
Herbert C. Wilkinson said, "Mr. Jefferies has responsiblility 
for administration of the foundation's educational grant and 
emergency financial assistance programs offered for Abbott 
employees, retirees, and their families." Previously Jef- 
feries was manager of marketing communications in the 
Abbott hospital products division. He joined the company in 
1972 as manager of professional services in the public affairs 
division. Jefferies holds a bachelor of fine arts degree from 
Ohio University in Athens. He and his wife reside in Liber- 
tyville. 

Receives Subcommittee Appointment 

Kay Schechter, Libertyville, has been appointed to a one- 
year term on the Home Health and Hospice Subcommittee of 
the Illinois Hospital Assn. Schechter is the director of 
Community Health Services at Highland Park Hospital, 
where she is the administrator for Home Health, Hospice and 
Alternative Adult Day Service. She is also administrator in 
charge ol developing new services for older adults. Schechter 
has been on the staff at Highland Park Hospital Tor three 
years. Her subcommittee responsibilities include in- 
volvement on committees which respond to the needs and 
concerns of Illinois hospitals, monitoring legislation and 
providing educational programs regarding home health and 
hospice. A member of the Illinois Council of Home Health 
Agencies and the National Assn. of Home Care, Schechter 
received her bachelor of science in nursing from the 
University of Illinois College of Nursing and her master of 
arts in health management from Webster Universitv. 

Offer Retirement Seminar 

In view of the new tax code, Skokie Federal will hold a free 
seminar on retirement and estate planning, at 7 p.m., Thur- 
sday, Jan. 22 at the North Shore Hilton in Skokie, Three at- 
torneys, Barbara Giryotas, Blooma Stark and Francis A. 
Beninati, from the Chicago law firm of Rosenthal and Schan- 
field, will conduct the seminar. Some of the topics -to be 
covered are: minimizing taxes in order to save for 
retirement; what to do with money saved at retirement; how 
to arrange payouts from pension plan; how to plan now for 
possible disability in the future; how to plan for possible 
disability of older relatives; and how to minimize taxes and 
ease the administrative burden on family at death. Reser- 
vations are required for the seminar. Those interested should 
contact Linda Sudendorf at (312) 676-5547. sl^Lil 



Complete Negotiations 

J.C. Forney and Co., commercial and industrial real estate 
specialists in Lake County, completed negotiations for the 
sale fo 1 .49 acres of prime land in Libertyville. The purchaser 
was Francis Carr Enterprises, and the seller was American 
Security Federal Savings Loan Assn. The parcel is adjacent 
to the Greentree Shopping Plaza on Milwaukee Ave. in Liber- 
tyville. Plans are being drawn for an expansion of the plaza 
to include this newly acquired site. Nearly 20,000 square feet 
of retail and office space is planned for the addition. The 
seller was represented by Jack Forney and Jim Page; and 
the purchaser, by Francis Carr. The property was listed for 
$265,000. 

- 

Hold Tax Reform Seminar 

, David Cain, a CPA (certified Public Accountant) with 
Milburn Cain and Co, of Gumee, will speak on the 1986 Tax 
Reform Act at a seminar in the Saint Therese Medical Center 
Educational Services Dept. The seminar will be held from 
7:30 to 9 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 12 at 2615 Washington St., 
Waukegan. For more information on this free program, call 
David Cain at (312) 336-6455. 



The Mortgage Report 




Th» national average on 30-year fixed-rats mortgages rose slightly to 
9.46 percent from last week's 9.44 percent Adjustable mortgages were 
steady at 7.83 percent. 

In Chicago, 30-year fixed-rale mortgages rose to 9.36 percent from 
last woek*s 9.35 percent Adjustable mortgages rose let) to 7 59 percont 
Irom last woek's 7.65 percent 



To have your institution listed bolow, call 312-670-2440. 

Pla 



Maximum 
Amount 



3,00% 
3.00% 

3.00% 
2.50% 

4.00% 
2.75% 

3.00% 
325% 



3.00% 
3.00% 



Fees 

$250 
$250 

$275 
$275 

$250 
$250 

$250 
$250 

$300 

$300 



Minimum 
Rata Typo Down Term 

Citicorp Savings (977-5040) 
9.25% F 20% 30 $250,000 

7.25% A/1 20% 30 $350,000 

Enterprise Savings (930-0000) 
9.25% F 10% 30 $133,250 

8.25% A/1 10% 30 $350,000 

Fi/e man's Fund Mat Corp. (5600001) 
9.00% F 5% 30 $133,250 

8.38% F 5% -15 $133,250 

First Family Mortgage (983-3445) 
9.25% F 10-30% 30 $133,250 

7.38% A/1 10-30% 30 $133,750 

First National of Chlcago(407-3849) 
9.75% F 10% 30 $250,000 

7.25% A/1 10% 30 $500,000 

Harris Trust (461-2490) 

9,75% F 10-20% 30 $133,250 

7.50% A/1 10-20% 30 $133,250 

St Paul Federal Savings (622-5000) 

9.88% F 5-20% 30 $153,100 

7.75% A/1 10-20% 30 $250,000 

Talman Home Mod. Corp. (680-0200) 
9.00% F 5% 30 $153,100 

7.75% A/1 10% 30 $153,100 

United Savings ol America (289-6000) 
9.25% F 10% 29 $153,100 

7.50% A/1 20% 29 $153,100 

Uptown Federal (967-0660) 

9.25% F 10% 30 $153,100 

7.50% A/1 10% 30 $153,100 

F- Fixed-rate mortgage] A/>- Adjustable rate mortgage, lollowed by the 
length of the adjustment period, usually expressed In years. All rates are 
subject to change without notice. 

Source: The M«yers R eport. a weekly survey of 1 1 5 C hie ago area lenders 
Is available to the public for $20. 

©1986 The Meyers Report — Chicago- 



3.00% $300 
2.00% $300 



250% 
1.50% 



3.00% 
1.00% 



250% 

3.00% 



3.00% 
150%, 



$250 
$250 



$275 

$275 



$300 

$300 



$275 
$275 



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FOX LAKE STATE BANK 




Your Marine 
Financing Specialist 

In The Heart Of The CHAIN O' LAKES. An- 
nounces LOW-LOW Rates Thru the BOAT 
SHOW Season. Boat Shows Begin January 
7, 1987 thru March 3, 1987. 

Call Your Loan Officer For Details On Simple In- 
terest And Adjustable Rate Loans. 

587-2112 

Pre-Approved Credit Is A Bargaining Tool 
Rates As Low As 8.5% APR 



FIFTY-FIVE EAST GRAKD AVENUE 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

587-2112 





FOH LRKE 
STATE 



- J ^. ■ 





8B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 967 



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--£3 



\ Sports ______ 

Carmel Faces Key Stretch 
With Pair Of Home Games 




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5,1987 



The future is this weekend 
'for the Carmel High School 
[boys basketball team. 

"It's time for this team to 

ut up or shut up," coach 

rank Belmont said. 

The Corsairs, who split 
'two games last weekend, 
ave home cooking in their 
avor this time around. Car- 
el hosts Holy Cross Jan. 16 
nd Horsey Jan. 17. 

"We have a chance to put a 
eal nice string together 
going into the second half of 
the season, " Belmont said. 

Belmont said his team is 
ready for such an assign- 
ment after beating Notre 
Dame 70-55 but losing to 
Weber 62-51 and St. Joseph 
69-57 last week. 

The game against Holy 
Cross is a key one for Car- 
mel, The Corsairs enter the 
game 4-2 in the East Subur- 
ban Catholic Conference, 
just ahead of Holy Cross in 
third place. 

"For league standings, 
this will be a big one," 
Belmont said. 

Belmont said he is pleased 
with his team's im- 
provement in the team 
leadership area. The Corairs 
came into the season with 
Rob Graham as their top 
returning player from last 
year's squad in terms of 
playing time. Dan Hdlver- 
son, who also saw playing 
time last year, is out for the 
season because of a knee in- 
Jury. 

"In high school basketball, 



it's really a guard's game. 
We really had untested 
people at the perimeter but 
now we're starting to get ef- 
fective guard play," 
Belmont said. 

The Corsairs jumped off to 
a 23-8 lead against Notre 
Dame and never looked 
back. By halftime, Carmel 
led 48-19. 

"We came out and played 
real strong," Belmont said. 
Scott Stahoviak led the 
winners with 21 points. John 
Welling had 15. Eleven CHS 
players reched the scoring 
column. 

While the fast start was 
the key against Notre Dame, 
it was Carmel's undoing a 
night later at Weber. 

Carmel fell behind 29-11 
and although the Corsairs 
played well in the middle of 
the game, the deficit was too 
much to overcome. 

"We got down early, but 
Welling was out because of 
fouls and Rob Graham was 
on the bench because of an 
injury. For the next three 
quarters, we played some of 
our better basketball of the 
season," Belmont said. 

The Corsairs trimmed 
Weber's margin to four poin- 
ts before running out of gas 
in the final quarter. 

Earlier in the week, 
Carmel went up against 
'ESCC leader St. Joseph. 

The Corsairs kept the pace 
to their liking early. But the 
team's old hangup, tur- 
novers, kept them from 



taking a lead after one as St. 
Joseph led 12-11. 

Missed free throws early 
did not help the cause, 
either. 

Belmont said the key was 
staying close. 

"You have to stay within 
three or four points. You're 
not going to get a run on that 
team. Sat there and you have 
a chance to pull it out at the 
end. We just did not quite 
stay close to them," Blemont 
said. 

The Cardinals opened up a 
six-pint lead midway 
through the second quarter, 
but three John Welling hoops 
closed the gap and Carmel 
trailed just 26-24 at halftime. 

St. Josephs, behind Clif- 
ford Scales, who is headed to 
Nebraska, opened up a wider 
margin in the third quarter. 
Scales scored eight points in 
the third period and 17 for 
the second half en route to a 
27 point outing. A hoop by 
Scales put the visitors ahead 
by 11 with just over a minute 
left in the third quarter. 

Scales was complimented 
in the offense by 16 points 
from Brian Molis, another 
player headed to a Division I 
school. 

# 

Graham, who had an off- 
night at the free-throw line, 
missing four of six, tallied 16 
points to lead Carmel. 
Welling had 13 and 
Stahoviak 12. 




Lew/sfown Likes Just What 
He Sees In Skyhawks ' Future 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Sports Editor 

A quick glance at the John- 
sburg High School basket- 
ball schedule shows that 
there are 11 regular-season 
games left. 

And as far as first-year 
coach Jeff Lewistown is con- 
cerned, that is more than 
enough time to make so 
waves in and out of the Nor- 
thwest Suburban Con- 
ference. 

"We'd hope we would be a 
little better. We have had a 
lot of injuries but now the 
kids are starting to get to 
know one another a bit now. I 
think people will see some 
exciting, hustling basket- 
ball," the Skyhawks' mentor 
said. 

Johnsburg, which- plays at 
Round Lake Jan. 16, was just 
coming off a 52-50 heart- 
breaking toss to Jacobs when 
Lewistown emphasized the 
possitive. The night before, 
Johnsburg dropped a 59-38 
decision to NWSC 
powerhouse Marengo. The 
Skyhawks are now 2-2 in the 
NWSC, 5-7 overall. 

"It was kind of a bit- 
tersweet loss. You hate to 
lose one like that when you 
come so close, but I saw so 
many good, positive things 
out there. The, kids played 
with intensity despite being 
outsized," Lewistown said. 

Lewistown had particular 
praise for forward Jeff 
Diedrich. Diedrich scored 16 
points to lead the home tean, 
depsite giving away several 
inches to Jacobs' Rich 
Rogala. Guard Chris Bonus, 
while not scoring any points, 
also earned plaudits. 



"I haven't seen a kid go up 
for as long and as hard as 
Jeff did," Lewistown said of 
Diedrich. 

On Bonus: "Chris didn't 
score any points but he did 
not have any turnovers, 
either. He played a flawless 
game," Lewistown said. 

But in the end, poor free- 
throw shooting early (John- 
sburg missed seven of its' fir- 
st eight, making six of 14 for 
the game) and too much 
Ragala was the difference. 
Ragala scored 20 points - the 
next highest Eagle scorer 
was Craig Wojas with 10. - 

Johnsburg rallied from a 
seven-point defeicit to cut 
Jacobs' lead to one, 37-36, en- 
tering the fourth quarter. 
Hoops by Ron Szat, who had 
13 points, Ed Nichols and 
Frank Husak trimmed the 
lead. 

Jacobs scored the first two 
baskets of the fourth quar- 



ter, increasing the margin to 
five. After a timeout, John- 
sburg responed on a three- 
point play by Nichols and a 
hoop by Diedrich to tie the 
game at 41. 

Johnsburg earned brief 
leads, first at45-43 then at 48- 
47 on another clutch 
Diedrich hoop with 2:25 left. 

The visitors answered, 
tieing the game at 50 with 
just under a minute left. 

A charge against Jacobs 
gave Johnsburg the ball at 
the 48 second mark, but the 
hosts turned it over at : 24. 

Jacobs then won the game 
on a baseline . jumper by 
Wojas. 

"The shot that was taken 
did not surprise me, but 1 
was surprised by who took 
it," Lewistown said. 

Johnsburg hopes the next 
11 games will bring some 
surprises for Skyhawks' op- 
ponents. 



Bowlers Struggle 



Grayslake coach Glen 
Watt will be the first to 
admit it. 

The 1986-87 Rams' bowling 
season will not be a banner 
year. 

"This is a rebuilding 
year," the Grayslake coach 
said as his team prepared 
for the -Jan. 17 Round Lake 
Invitational. 

And the team's latest 
results show that to be the 
case. Last week. Grayslake 
lost a dual to Round Lake 
2,338-1,964. The Rams also 
finished 14th of 16th at the 



Jacobs Invitational. 

One bright spot for 
Grayslake in both meets was 
senior Kathy Paulsen. 
Paulsen finished 22nd at 
Jacobs, earning a trophy. 
She also was Grayslake's top 
bowler against Round Lake 
with a 485 series. 

Watt said Paulsen is his 
team's hopes to qualify out 
of sectionals. 

"She's starting to come on 
real strong. She has an 
outside chance to get out of 
sectionals," Wattsaid. 



;*• 



Stahoviak Up For Two 

Carmel basketball player Scott Stahoviak puts up a jumper against St. Joseph. 
John Dragas (34) provides defense for the Chargers. Carmel lost the East Suburban 
Catholic Conference game 59-47. Camrel hosts Holy Cross and Hersey Jan. 16 and 
Jan. 17. — Photo by Craig Vogel. 

Panthers To Return Home 

Round Lake's boys basket- 
ball team will have an op- 
portunity to do something 
they haven't done in 1987 on' 
Jan. 16. 

That's when the Panthers 
return to their home court to 
host Johnsburg in a 7: 30 p.m. 
Northwest Suburban Con- 
ference game. The contest 
will be the first game played 
in Panther territory since 
Dec. 5. ' 

"It will be'good to play a 
home game," Round Lake 
coach Bob Ward said. 

The Panthers, despite a 
better than .500 8-5 overall 
record, won their first 
league game with- a 61-33 
thrashing of Wauconda. 

The Panthers jumped off 
to a 16-6 lead after eight 
minutes and were ahead 34- 
14 by halftime. 

"We executed well and did 
not turn the ball over very 
much," Ward said. 

The visitors also had a 
huge advantage in reboun- 
ding as Round Lake had 34 to 
Wauconda's 20. 

Jim Bills led Round Lake 
with 23 points and junior 
guard Frank Russell had 11. 

As for the Johnsburg con- 
test, Round Lake will be 
facing a team coming off a 
tough non-conference loss to 
Jacobs. 

"They have two starters 
back from last year in Frank 
Husak and Ron Szat. Szat 
gave us trouble in side last 
year," Ward said. 

The Panthers are making 
progress, the coach said. 

"We've put two good 
games together in a row 
now," Ward said. 



Elsewhere in 


the NWSC, 


Jan. 16. Both teams are 


something will have to give 


winless in the NWSC, and 


when Wauconda and Marian 


have a 2-16 record between 


Central meet at Woodstock 


them. 


o 

Northwest Sub. Conf. 


IU 


ri< 


□iriyb 


Cant. 

W L 


All 
W 


L 


RmuIIi 


. 






Lake Fowl 61 , Mundeleln 58 


Gram * " 


13 


2 


Jocobl S3. Johniburg SO 


Lake Zurich 4 


9 


4 


Warren 55. Zlon-Benlon 47 


Marengo 4 1 


11 


2 


Gronl 54, Grayiloke 47 


Johniburg 3 2 


3 


7 


Fenian 42, Anlloch 41 


Round Lake 1 3 


s 


S 


Gronl 53. Cryito! Lake Cent. 4B 


Grayiloke \ 3 


4 


7 


Round I ok * 61 , Wauconda 33 


Morion 1 4 


t 


8 


LoK« Zurich SB, Marian Cent, 42 


Wauconda 4 


1 


B 


Carmel 70, Noi r • Dome 55 
Weber 62. Carmel SI 
Sfeventon 79, North Chicago 73 


toll Jub.Cath.Cont. 






Marengo SB, Johniburg 39 


Conf. 


All 




RkhmondBurian 36, Vallay Lulharon 3S 


W L 


W 


L 


Richmond 'Burton 63. Harvard 60 


St. /cirph S O 


9 


2 




St. Patrick S 1 


11 


3 




Corn-mi 3 2 


a 


6 


Oomti Ihli Weekend 


Holy Got i 4 2 


6 


e 




St. Vlolor 2 4 


7 


7 


Jan. 11 


Mornl 2 4 


7 


e 




Joll»t 3 4 


6 


9 


Anlioch otFenlon 


NoiraDome O 6 


3 


13 


Grayiloke of Morengo 
Holy Crotl ol Carmel 


North Sub. Conf. 






Wauconda ot Marlon Central 




All 




Johniburg at Round lake 


w t 


W 


L 


Lake Zurich al Grant 


Lake For e it ot Warren 


lakoFor.nl 6 
War run S 1 


11 
8 


3 
5 


North Chicago ot Nllei North 
tlbertyvlllo atMundeleln 


N. Chicago 4 2 - 


B * 


5 




Slevenion 4 3 


7 


6 




l!b«rtyvilla 4 3 


5 


6 




Zion B. 2 4 


5 


B 




Mundaletn 2 * 


4 


9 


Jan. 17 


Fonlon 2 5 


3 . 


9 


Mundetein at North Chicago 


Anlloch 1 5 


3 


11 


Warren at Antioth 



4-j 



The Good Old Days 

Shaving was once looked upon as perverted. Only defeated 
enemies, lepers, and other outcasts were shaved to call at- 
tention to them and to keep others away from them. 



Tho Pain Of Writing 

Most people think of Mark Twain as a man who wrote a mass 
of great writing. Actually! most of the work which Twain 
ever wrote was badly panned by critics, and he himself often 
commented on its mediocrity. 



f- 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



^./SMMNWM 



££k 



■-■>: 



<* 



Sports 



Women Notch Third Straight, CLC Men Aim To Rebound 



The College of Lake County's mens and 
womens basketball teams appear to be 
heading in different directions midway 
through this 1986-87 season. 

After losing their first five games, the 
Lady Lancers won their third in a row last 
week, posting a convincing 47-36 win over 
visiting Waubonsee in the Lancers' con- 
ference opener. 

Lake County seemed to be in control the 
entire game, jumping out ti a 28-21 halftime 
lead which they would never relinquish. 

"We changed our defense at halftime, 
which helped us preserve the win. Overall, 
wc played a pretty respectable game," head 
coach Chuck Schramm said. 

Individually for Lake County, Kelly 
Halkyard, making a strong comeback 
following an ankle injury, led the way with 13 
points. Karen Hermann added nine, while 
Wendy Christina and Chris Ewert each 
tallied eight. 



With the win, CLC upped its record to 3-5 
overall, 1-0 in the Skyway Conference. The 
Lancers travel to Crystal Lake to face M- 





NOTEBOOK 

By John Phelps 



cHenry Jan. 15 and Highland Jan. 17. 

On the opposite side of the coin, it's been a 
roller coaster year so far for the mens 



basketball team. Despite an exciting and 
tense game throughout, Lake County 
dropped its third in a row, losing 84-79 in 
overtime to Waubonsee. 

The Lancers have suffered a few tough 
losses this year, but as coach Bruce Smith 
said, "this one was our toughest all year." 

CLC apparently seemed in control, holding 
a 39-35 lead at halftime. Late in the game, 
however, Lake County continued to cling to a 
four-point lead when the delay game was 
called upon. The result was two Waubonsee 
steals converted into baskets and the game 
wastied74-74. 

"We just had poor execution of our delay 
game. Wc haven't used it much this year," 
Smith said. 

In the OT, Lake County collasped. 
Waubonsee's Chiefs, (8-8), scored the first 
six points and proceeded to outscorc CLC 10-5 
and notch the victory. 

All five CLC starters scored in double 



figures. Leading the way was Terry Wright 
with 22 points. David Tucker pumped in 19, 
Dave Sitz 15, Mark Kohl 12 and Todd Gordon 
11. CLC had several sharp plays offensively, 
including back-door passes and inside 
penetration throughout the game, 

CLC tangles with McHenry Jan. 15 and 
travels to Wright Jan. 20. 

Switch Site 

Fans wishing to attend the Jan. 16 
basketball game between Warren and Lake 
Forest should be advised not to go the 
Gurnee campus. 

The contest will be the first varisly game 
played by Warren at the College of Lake 
County. Game times arc. 6 p.m. for the 
sophomore game and 7:30 p.m. for the 
varsity contest. 

CLC Athletic Director Frank Minnerly 
said 800 scats will be provided. 



Showdown Pits Grant / Lake Zurich In Contest 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Sports Editor 

It's showdown time in the 
Northwest Suburban Con- 
ference basketball race. 

Lake Zurich and Grant, 
both with perfect 4-0 league 
records, clash at Grant High 
School Jan. 16 in a battle for 
control of first place. The ■ 
winner gets a game lead 
while the loser will be 
playing catch-up the rest of 
the conference season. 

"It will be one of our 
biggest games of the year," 
Grant coach Tom Maple 
said. 

Fortunately for the 
Bulldogs, they will be 
coming into the key contest 



off a tight 54-47 win over 
Grayslake and a 53-48 non- 
conference win over Crystal 
Lake Central. The victories 
give Grant a 12-2 overall 
record. 

The Lake Zurich versus 
Grant matchups promises to 
be decided by which team's 
big players dominate. Lake 
Zurich has 6' 6" senior for- 
ward Tom Jesse and 6* 6" 
forward Dave Hempning. 
Grant counters with 6' 6" 
Don Kiegan and 6' 1" Ron 
Richford in the middle. 

Maple said the Bears also 
have depth on their side. 

"They have eight or nine 
players they can go to," he 
said, 



Richford led the Grant at- 
tack in both wins last week. 

Against Grayslake, the 
Bulldogs needed every one of 
Richford's 25 points to turn 
back a scrappy Rams team. 

"I was not happy with the 
way we played offensively 
but you have to give 
Grayslake credit. They 
threw a matchup zone again- 
st us that we were not 
prepared for," Maple said. 

For Grayslake coach Greg 
Groth, whose forces play 
Marengo Jan. 16, the loss 
dropped his team to 4-7 
overall, 1-3 in league play. 

"We worked real well 
defensively on the weak side 
and we talked a lot," Groth 



said. 

Grayslake, despite a size 
disadvantage, played 
aggressively but Grant 
came down with the clutch 
rebounds. 

"They had the big reboun- 
ds when it counted," Groth 
said. 

Grant took a three-point 
lead into the fourth quarter 
and increased it to five when 
Richford hit a shot with 4:26 
left. Two Richford free 
throws gave the visitors 
another five-point cushion 
with just2:31 left. 

Grayslake rallied, cutting 
the lead to one on a hoop by 
Andrew Flood and another 
by Butch LeNoir to make it 



44-43. 

Grant then made nine of 11 
free throws in the final 90 
seconds to secure the win. 

Flood, playing on a 
sprained ankle, led 
Grayslake with 15 points 
while LeNoir had 10. 

Maple said his team's win 
over Crystal Lake Central 
should give it "credibllty- to 
go with 12-2". 

The Tigers featured, star 
forward Bill Heppncr, who is 
headed to DcPaul next year. 

Grant opened strong in 
this non-league affair, 
leading 12-10 after eight 
minutes and using a 16-7 
second-quarter edge for a 28- 
17 halftime lead. 



"We were ahead by 11 and 
that allowed us to overcome 
a bad third quarter," Maple 
said. 

Central rallied to 
dominate the third period 19- 
7 and took a 37-36 lead en- 
tering the final quarter. 

But the Bulldogs had the 
Tigers' number, winning the 
final period 18-12 to post a 53- 
48 win. 

Elsewhere in the NWSC, 
Round Lake hosts John- 
sburg, Marian Central bat- 
tles Wauconda. The Pan- 
thers will be looking for 
another win to keep their 
momentum. Marian Central 
and Wauconda have both 
struggled this year. 



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1GB Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 




* - - ■ J— . . * . 



—LEGAL- 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
COUNTY OF LAKE, « 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
FOR THE 19TH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT. LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

GMAC Mortgage Cor- 
poration, a Successor in 
Interest to Colonial 
Mortgage Services Inc. 

vs. 
David L. Taylor, et al., 
Defendants 
No.B6Ch.646. 

The requisite affidavit 
for publication having 
been filed, notice is hereby 
give you, Unknown 
Owners defendant(s) in 
the above entitled suit, 
that the sold suit has been 
commenced in the Cirult " 
Court of Lake County, 
Chancery Division, by the 
said plaintiff— against you 
and other defendants, 
praying for the foreclosure 
of a certain (Mortgage) 
conveying the premises 
described os follows, to- 
wit: 

Lots 21 and 22 in Block 
95 in Round Lake Beach 
Sunset Addition, a 
subdivision of the South 
West Quarter of 
Section 17, Township 45 
North, range 10, East of 
the Third Principal 
Meridian, (Except the 
West 300 feel of the 
East 730 Feet of the 
North 434 feet thereof), 
according lo the plat 
thereof, recorded June 
17, 1929, as document 
338546, in Book '1" of 
plots pages 76 and 77, 
in Lake County, Illinois. 
Commonly Known As, 
1429 Walnut D.-ive 
Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073 

Permanent I.O, No. 06- 
17-313-013 

and which said (Mortgage) 
was made by Terronce M. 
Marion, Mortgagor to 
Caldwell Banker 

Residential Mortgage 
Service* a» (Mortgagee), 
and recorded in the office 
of the Recorder of Deeds of 
Lake County, Illinois, as 
'document number 
2200763, and for other 
relief; that summons was 
duly issued out of the said 
Court against you as 
provided by. law, and that 
the said suit * Is * now 
pending. 

Now, therefore, unless 
you, the said above named 
defendant(s), file your 
answer to the Complaint in 
the said suit or otherwise 
make your appearance 
therein, in the office of the 



Clerk of the Circuit. Court 
of Lake County, in the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Woukegon, Illinois, on or 
before the 9th day of 
February, 1987, default 
may be entered ogninsl 
you at any time after that 
day and a Judgment en- 
tered In accordance with 
the prayer of said Com- 
plaint. 

Dated, Waukogan, 
Illinois, January 8. 1987. 

Sally D. Coffelt, 
Clerk 
Charles T. Kropik, At- 
torney for Plaintiff. 

187A-236-FL 

January 1, 

Januarys, & 

January 15, 1987 



—LEGAL- 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 

Custom Product Marketing 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRAN- 
SACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
92 N. Forest Avenue, Fox 
Lake, It. 60020. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWN1NG,- 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Joel Glenn McClain, 92 N. 
Forest Avenue, Fox Lake, 
11.60020. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS' 
COUNTY OF LAKE, it 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of Iho person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Joel A.McCloin 
January 7,1987 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, ti 

Tho foregoing in- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending 
to conduct the business 
this January?, 1987, . 

George Kruogor 
Notary Public 
RECEIVED: Jan. 8, 1987 
Linda lanuzl Hess 
Lake County Clerk 

187C-249-FL 

January 15, 

January 22, & 

January 29, 1987 



-LEGAL- 
SECTION 00020 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

1. GENERAL 

A. PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given that the Village of 
Lindenhurst, Illinois will receive sealed Bids for the con- 
struction of the Lindenhurst Elevated Water Storage Tank 
in compliance with Ihe Contract Documents prepared by 
CRS Slrrlne, Inc. v 

B. Sealed Bids will be received until 10:00 A.M. Local 
Time on February 2, 1987 al ihe Village of Lindenhurst, 
Illinois. Mailed Bids shall be moiled to the Village of Lin- 
denhurst, 2301 E. Sand Lake Road, Lindenhurst, Illinois 
60046, and must be received by 10:00 A.M. Local Time on 
the Bid Date. 

C. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud Im- 
mediately after expiration of the time established above 
for ihe receipt of Bids. 

D. The project consists of furnishing and erecting a 0.75 
MG elevated water storage lank, Instrumentation and 
conlrots, site work, foundation, cathodlc. protection 
system, painting, testing, and disinfection. 

E. Bid award subject to payment of the proceeds of the 
Sale of Revenue Bonds and Build Illinois Grant proceeds. 

2. BIDDING DOCUMENTS 

A. Bidding documents consist of a Project Manual con- 
taining bidding and contract requirements, and technical 
specifications, geolechnical report, and Drawings. 

B. Bidding documents may be obtained at CRS Sirrine, 
Inc., 8700 W. Bryn Mawr Avenue, Soulh Tower, Suite 400, 
Chicago, Illinois 60631 between the hours of 8:00 A.M. 
and 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, upon payment of 
$25.00 per set. Checks shall be payable lo CRS Slrrlne, 
Inc. This payment will not be refunded. 

C. Bidding Documents will be available on or about 
January 15, 1987. 

D. Bidding Documents may be examined at the 
following locations: 

1. CRS Sirrtne, Inc.-Chlcago, IIIInols-8700 W. Bryn 
Mawr Avenue, South Tower, Suite 400 (60631). 

2. The Village of Llndenhurst-Llndenhurst, ltlinols-2301 
East Sand Lake Road (60046). 

3. Dodge Plan Rooms-Chicago, lllinois-230 West 
Monroe Street (60606). 

4. Dodge/Scon-Chicago, lllinois-230 West Monroe 
Street (60606). 

3. BID SECURITY 

A. Bid Security in the amount of five (5) percent shall 
accompany each Bid In compliance with ihe Instruction lo 
Bidders. 

4. SPECIAL FEATURES 

A. The Contractor will be required to comply with the 
"Wages of Employees on Public Works (Prevailing Woge) 
Act" (Illinois Revised Statutes, Chapter 48, Section 39s-l 
et seq.) 

5. OWNERS RIGHTS RESERVED 

A. The Owner reserves the right to reject any non- 
responsive or non-responsible Bids or to reject all Bids 
ana to waive any informality or technicality in any Bid in 
Ihe interest of the Owner. 
END OF SECTION 

T87C-247-LV 
Jonuary.15, 1987 



—LEGAL- 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, u 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE 
COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE 
PETITION OF Fredrick A. 
Kennedy, For CHANGE OF 
NAME 
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 

Public notice is hereby 
aiven that on Feb. 19, 1987 
being one of the return 



days in the Circuit Court of 
Ihe County of Lake, I will 
file my Petition In said 
Court praying tor the 
change of my name from 
Fredrick A, Kennedy to 
that of Fredrick A. Buf- 
fenbargor, pursuant to the 
Statute in such case made 
and Provided. 

Dated at Grayslake, 
Illinois, Jan. 8. 1987. 

187B-245-AR 

January 8, 

January 15, & 

January 22, 1987 



—LEGAL- 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
COUNTY OF COOK, st 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE 19th JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

Greatamerican Federal 
Savings and Loan 
Association, formerly 
known as Oak Park 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association, a corporation 
organized and existing 
under the laws of the 
United States of America, 
Plaintiff 

vs. 
Terrence E. King, Barbara 
L. King, Northbrook Trust & 
Savings Bank as trustee, 
under trust agreement 
dated June 1, 1978 and 
known as trust no. LT-1790, 
and Unknown Owners, 
Defendants 
No. 86CH4 

NOTICE OF 
SHERIFF'S SALE 
Public notice is hereby 
given that, pursuant to a 
Judgment made and 
entered by said Court in 
the above entitled cause 
on October 22, 1986, I, 
Robert Babcox, Sheriff of 
Lake County, Illinois, will, 
on Monday, February 2, 
1987, at the hour of 9:00 
A.M. in Room C-105 of the 
Lake County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell al 



/ 



public vendue to the 
highest and best bidder for 
cash, the following 
described premises and 
real estote, in said 
Judgment mentioned, 
situated in the County of 
Lake and State of Illinois, 
or so much thereof as shall 
be sufficient to. satisfy said 
Judgment, to-wlt: 
Lot 57 in Deerpath Unit 
No. 2, being a 
Subidivision of part of 
the South West quarter 
of Section 4, Township 
43 North, Range 11, 
East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, 
according to the plat 
thereof, recorded April 
22, 1974, as Document 
1660327. in Book 53 of 
Plats, pages 60, 61 and 
62, in Lake County, 
Illinois, commonly 
known as: 213 On- 
wentsia Road, Vernon 
Hills, Illinois. 

Doted, Waukegan, Illinois, 
January 8th, 1987. 

Robert Babcox, Sheriff of 
Loke County, Illinois. 
Walsh, Case, Coale & 
Brown, Attorney(s) for 
Plaintiff; 2500 Prudential 
Plaza, Chicago, Illinois. 
60601 
Tel. No. 938-3824. 

187A-235-FL 

January 1, 

Januarys, & 

January 15, 1987 



—LEGAL— 
GURNEE ZONING NOTICE 

PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given to all persons in the 
Village of Gurnee, Loke County, Illinois, that a public 
hearing will be held in the Gurnee Municipal Building, 
4573 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois, on February 4, 
1987, at 7:30 P.M., on the petition of Mr. Thomas Olsen to 
amend or change the terms of the Gurnee Zoning Or- 
dinance No. 80-29, by amendment, so as lo reclassify 
certain reol estate described as follows, to-wlt: 
The Soulh 1 50 feet of Lot I and 2 in Block 4 of Frederick 
H. Bartlett's North Shore Gardens, being a subdivision 
of all of that part of the Northeast Quorter and of the 
West Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast 
Quarter of Section 24, Township 45 Norlh, Range II, 
East of the Third P.M., according to the ptat thereof, 
Recorded Sept. 4. 1924 as document 245209, in Book 
"M" of Plats, pages 90 and 91 , In Lake County, Illinois, 
from a R-3, singte family residential, classification to a 
R-4, two family residential, zoning classification. 
Said property is located at the Northwest corner of 
Belle P loin e Street and University Avenue. 

Said petition and request are on file and available for 
examination in the office of the Zoning Administrator at 
the Gurnee Municipal Building, 4573 Grand Avenue, 
Gurnee, Illinois. 

All persons interested are Invited to attend said 
hearing and be heard. _. ... minticemKt 

DATED: January 12. 1987 PLAN C °Xage OF 

GURNEE. ILLINOIS 

BY; James T. Hayner 

Zoning Administrator 

187C-24B-GP 

January 15, 1987 



—LEGAL— 

Notice is hereby given thai a Public Hearing will be 
held at 7:35 P.M. on Tuesday, February 3, 1987 In the 
Council Chambers of the Village Hall, 164 Hawley Street, 
Grayslake, Illinois by the Zoning Board of Appeals of the 
Village of Grayslake for the purpose of considering tho 
following amendments: 
1. CENTRAL BUSINESS A 

Add the following paragraph to section 201, "Establish- 
ment of Zones", page 6. 

Centra) Business A (CBA): This business zone Is 
established to provide pedestrian-oriented areas for 
commercial establishments which offer a wide range of 
goods and services with required off street parking. 

2. Remove the "x" notation from Two-Family Dwelling 
In the R3A Zone, Section 202, Table I, "Principle Uses Per- 
mitted In Zones", page 16. 

3. Minimum Lot Width 

Change the Entry in Section 203, Table 2, "Lot Area, 
Yard and Bulk Regulations", page 18, for R3A and R3 
Zones under Lot size. Width, for single family dwellings 
from 70 to 60 respectively to 701 and 601. 

4. Residential 3 (R3) 

Change the following In Section 203, Table 2, "Lot Area, 
Yard and Bulk Regulations", Page IB, change Total Side 
Yard from 18 to 12 feet. 

5. General Business Zone (GB) 

Add the following In Section 203, Table 2, Lot Area, 
Yard, and Bulk Regulations, Page 21 lo Increase General 
Business Structure coverage from 25 to 30% . 

6. Amend the following to Section 203, Table 2, Lot 
Area, Yard and Bulk Regulations, Page 21 , under General 
Business. 

LOT AREA, YARD AND BULK REGULATIONS 
See Chart "A" 

7. Drop Footnote 6 In Secllon 203, Footnotes to Table 2, 
Page 22. Renumber 7 to 6. 



8. Section 209 -"Miscellaneous Requirements" Page 41. 
A. All permanent buildings and structures Intended 
for human occupancy shall be connected to central 
sewage treatment and water supply utility systems, ex- 
cept single family dwellings may have private water 
wells and septic fields, provided the following 
requirements are met. 
Amend to Read As Follows: 

1. A community sanitary sewer main or water main Is 
not available within 250 feel of any boundary line of lot, 

9. Change Secllon 209 S 3; page 41 . 

3. Connection to a community sewer line shall be 
made within one year from time ihot Ihey become 
available. 
Amend to Read As Follows: 

3. Connection to a community sewer main or water 
main shall be made within one year from lime that they 
become available. 

10. Add the Following to Section 209 H, Other Uses and 
Regulations, Page 44. 

10. Accessory Structures: No accessory structure shall 
be placed closer than five (5) feet to any property line. 

1 1 . Change Section 401 2 B, "Side Yards", page 59. 

b. Side Yards: Each side yard required for a non- 
conforming recorded lot shall be determined by 
multiplying the actual width of the lot by the yard 
required In the zone in which the lot Is located, divided by 
the minimum lot width required In the zone In which the 
lot Is located. However, nonconforming side yard shall be 
less than five (5) feet. 
Amend to Read As Follows: 

b. Side Yards: Each Side Yard required for a non- 
conforming recorded lot shall be determined by 
multiplying the actual width of the lot by the yard 

LOT AREA. YARD AND BULK REGULATIONS 



required in the zone in which the lol Is located, divided by 
the minimum tot width required in Ihe zone In which ihe 
lot Is located. However, nonconforming side yards shall 
not be less than five (5) feet. 

12. Change Section 505 B3 "Slandards for Variations", 
page 5. 

d. Thai the aforesaid circumstances or conditions are 
such that the strict application of the provisions of the 
Zoning Ordinance would deprive the applicant of any 
reasonable use of his land. Mere loss in value shall not 

tustify a variation; there must be a deprivation of 
jonellciol use of land. 
Amend to Read As Follows: 

d. That the aforesaid circumstances or conditions ore 
such that the strict application of the provisions of the 
Zoning Ordinance would result In a practical difficulty or 
a particular hardship to the owner, as distinguished from 
a mere Inconvenience, 

13. Graphics 

of the Grayslake Zoning Ordinance of Grayslake, Illinois 
being Ordinance No. 77-0-26 adopted by the corporate 
authorities of the Village of Grayslake on August 15, 
1977. 

All Interested parties are Invited to attend said hearing 
and be heard if so desired. 

Dated at Grayslake, Lake County, Illinois this 15th Day 
of January, 1987. 

Charles Elden, Chairman 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Village of Grayslake 

January 15, 1987 

187C-250-GL 

January 15, 1987 



V 





■ 


LOT S12L _, 


YA 


RDS 




' 1 


ABUTTIMC 


ABUTTING A 




BULK 




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USR 


AREA WIDTH 


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REAR 


TOTAL 
SIZE 


MINIMUM- 
SIZE 


A 

STREET 


RESIDENTIAL 

jntq; 


STRUCTURAL 
COVERAGE 


F.A.R. 


HEIGHT 
PRIMCIP 


OF 

-£LE«IJJ>IHC 
14 


HEIGHT OF 
ACCESSOBV «t nr 


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2 


1 4 


i 


6 


1 7 


8 


9 


10 

pi- 


11 


12 


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Any Pereiitted Ufii 


Sq. Fc. r«et _ 


Ft. 


Ft. 


Ft . 






— * 


"f" 




Fr. 


Stnrl*. 


Fi^ 


Sj-nrl.. 


CB 


WLch Concunlty Stuart 


10,000 50 


SO 


30 


24 


12 


50 . 


eo 


30 


.40 


1 *° 


3.0 


20 


" 1 




Without Conmintcy Seweri 


20,000 100 


75 

* 


30 


** 


12 


75 


80 


30 


.40 


.40 


3.0 


20 


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without Cotnwnlty Stvar^ 


40,000 no 


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3D 


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12 


75 


ao 


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irsday, January 15, 1987 



CHART "A" 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 1B 



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Lumber /Ring Say No To County Supporters 



byJOHNSTElNKE 
(Political Columnist) 

Last December, Lake 
County Board Chairman Jim 
LaBelle was reelected to a 
second two-year term. Bob 
Neal's regular Republicans 
supported LaBelle's reelec- 
tion over the opposition of 
Norm Geary's independent 
Republicans and John 
Balen's Democrats. LaBelle 
then appointed regular 
Republicans to the major 
committee chairmanships. 

The independent 

Republicans are attempting 
to recruit candidates to op- 
pose party regulars in the 
1988 GOP primary. 



Two vulnerable in- 
cumbents are Dist. 4 
representatives, Jim Fields 
of Antioch and Fred Popp of 
Lake Villa. Both Fields and 
Popp are regular 
Republicans, who will be 
seeking reelection in the 1988 
March primary. County 
Board Dist. 4 includes An- 
tioch, Avon, Lake Villa, and 
Grant Twps. in western Lake 
County. It is a solid 
Republican area with a 
bounty on Democrats. The 
GOP primary is tantamount 
to the election. 

Lakeland Newspapers has 
learned that independent 
Republicans are en- 
couraging Barbara Lumber 



of Round LaKe and Antioch 
Highway Commissioner 
Mark Ring to oppose Popp 
and Fields in next year's 
primary election. Mrs. Lum- 
ber, the wife of a prominent 
Antioch attorney, was an un- 
successful Democratic coun- 
ty board candidate in the 
1984 elections. She was 
narrowly defeated by Fred 
Popp in a three-way race. 
Two years ago, Mark Ring 
fielded an independent can- 
didacy against the Jim 
Fields organization for An- 
tioch Twp. highway com- 
missioner. The 29-year-old 
Ring easily defeated David 
Heath, a Fields appointee, 
for the of fice. 
Lakeland contacted both 



Barbara Lumber and Mark 
Ring regarding their poten- 
tial candidacies for the coun- 
ty board in next year's elec- 
tions. Mrs. Lumber ruled out 
any county board candidacy 
on the Republican ticket 
because of her commitment 
to the Democratic party and 
its philosophy. "It would go 
against my grain," Lumber 
stated. 

Mark Ring asserted that 
he had no interest in running 
for the county board. Ring 
maintained, "Two years 
ago, I was elected to serve a 
four-year term as highway 



commissioner. I would be 
betraying the public trust if I 
fielded a candidacy for the 
county board. I wasn't elec- 
ted highway commissioner 
in order to advance my 
political aspirations.' The 
voters selected me for this 
office because they believed 
that I was the most qualified 
person to administer the 
township highway depart- 
ment. I intend to fulfill these 
public expectations, and 
seek reelection in 1989." 

Ring concluded, "I will 
never run for the county 
board. I'm privileged to ser- 



ve In the best public office in 
. Lake County: Antioch Twp. 
Highway Commissioner. I 
hope people understand that 
I don't have any political 
aspirations beyond my 
present position. I'm remin- 
ded of what Civil War Gen. 
William T. Sherman said 
when he was asked to run for 
president following the war 
between the states. Gen. 
Sherman stated, 'If 
nominated, I will not run. If 
elected, I will not serve.' 
This statement summarizes 
my attitude toward the coun- 
ty board." 



Dada Praises Assistance 
In Blaze At Rustic Manor 



Weather Top Subject 
Of Tall-Tale Tellers 



Gurnee Fire Chief Sam 
Dada is praising the efforts 
of 18 Lake County fire 
departments which assisted 
the village in the Jan. 9 
Rustic Manor fire. 

"There is no way a small 
town like ours could have 



fought that big a fire. They 
gave us excellent assistance. 
The firefighters that 
responded were good, 
aggressive firefighters. No 
one was standing around," 
hesaid. 
Dada estimated that 115 




Wilderness Outpost 

John Gans, Alaska Division Director of the National 
Outdoor Leadership School will be the senior in- 
structor for a special program on outdoor back- 
packing. The program will be held at Ryerson Woods 
on Saturday, .Feb. 12. 




UNDER 

NEW 

OWNERSHIP 

BARK 'N' TOWN 

Kennels 

Dog & Cat Boarding 

"A Home Away From 
Home From 1 Day To ? 

Always Open For 
Your Inspection 

•Grooming 

•Bathing 

Bring In This Ad For 
$1 .00 Per Nite OFF 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 
Ingleside, IL 60041 

(815) 385-0632 



1 C 

FABRIC SALE 

COTTONS 
KNITS 
FABRIC 

BLOCKS 

BY THE BUS 

ISO'S OF ITEMS 

SEWING 

FACTORY 

OUTLET 

3280 Sheridan Rd., ZION, IL 

(312)872-8988* 

OPEN DAILY 7 DAYS 




firemen were on the scene at 
the fire. Grand Ave. was 
closed off to traffic. 

Those sending assistance 
to gurnee were: Wauconda, 
North Chicago, Vernon Hills, 
Antioch, Round Lake, Lake 
Villa, Waukegan, Grayslake, 
Bonnie Brook, Lake Bluff, 
Mundelein, Countryside, 
Great Lakes Naval Training 
Center, Highwood, Deer- 
field, Libertyville and Lake 
Forest. 

Investigators, meanwhile, 
are beginning their efforts 
into the cause of the blaze. 
No cause has been deter- 
mined. 

No damage estimate has 
been arrived at, either, Dada 
said. 

He added that fire mar- 
shals are working with 
Gurnee to help find a cause. 

Owners remain hopeful 
that the fire will not crush 
hopes for reopening the 
historic restaurant. 

"We're hopeful; we can't 
give up," Lee Trybom, wife 
of owner Marv Trybom, 
said. 



A gt;:Memen from Missouri has been 
judged the top talc-teller of 1986 by the 
nationally-known Burlington Liars Club of 
Burlington, Wis. 

The club has been naming top liars for 50 
years and this year received entries from 
over a dozen foreign couuntries and 23 states. 
The state of the weather seemed to be the 
tall-tale tellers' favorite subject. 

Winning over 305 competitors, Charles 
Klott of Herman, Mo. had a story that talked 
about the historic Biblical floods. 

Klott claims, "A man bought land in a 
distant state and when he went to visit his 
holdings he found it quite dry. He stopped at 
an elderly neighbor's and asked whether it 
ever rained in those parts. 

The neighbor replied, "Sometimes." 

Months later the man returned to see his 
land again and found it even drier than 
before. He asked his neighbor again if it ever 
rained there. 

The old neighbor answered, "Well, you've 



read in the Bible about 40 days and 40 nights 
or rain. Well, we got a quarter-inch." 

James Belch, Hope Mills, N. C, said that 
"It rained so hard yesterday water was 
backed-up against my bared-wire fence." 

Last year's champion liar, Mary Marie 
Weatherly, Oklahoma City, Okla., won an 
honorable mention by saying that "My sister 
painted a bowl of apples that looked so real 
that the frame she used got worm holes in 
it." 

A local liar, Jack Sorenson, Kenosha, 
wrote, "It was so cold last December that, 
when we heard a loud pop outside our front 
door and went out to see what it was, we 
found pieces of glass from our porch light 
and among the pieces were tiny specs. We 
counted them and sure enough there were 60 
of them,' all 60 watts of the frozen light bulb 
were frozen alive." 

The only profession excluded from the an- 
nual tale-telling competition are politicians, 
"because they're professionals." 



The 



J 360b0 N. Grandwood Dr. 
J Gurnee, IL 60031 





(312) 
356-5200 



Join Us For Our 2nd Anniversary Celebration 

Surf And Turf Dinner For 2 

Just $2 1 .95 

(10 oz. Butt Steak'/ 4-4 '/• oz. Cold Water Lobster Tall) 
Special offer expires January 31st, 1987 




Caring, not curing. 




The healthcare needs of our community are not 
bound by time. When needed, we are here. 

STAR HOSPICE 

satat tteerzese m&oical ceuterz 



2615 Washington Street • Waukegan, Illinois 60085 • (31 2) 360-2220 

Hospice serves all those whose lives are 
touched by a terminal illness. 

A full service Hospice Program serving Lake County. 



12B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 



■■■- ■'.•• •■■■ ,.',■■ 



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/', . i 




Anll^A 

belongs 
in your 

financial 

future 



The 1986 Tax Reform Act does not affect your Individual Retirement Account contribution for income 
earned in the 1 986 tax year. The new law applies to earned income beginning January 1 , 1 987. 

However, this may be your last chance to take advantage of the tax-deductibility of your IRA contribution. 
For more information on how your IRA will be affected, contact one of our State Bank of Antioch new 

aCCOUnt representatives. Penalty for early withdrawal. 

Make your 1986 tax-deductible contribution now to a State Bank of Antioch 2-year certificate of deposit paying a 
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With a minimum deposit of $10.00 or more our 1 8-month IRA Variable Statement Savings may be just the right 
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PHONE: (312) 395-2700 



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440 LAKE STREET— ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 



Thursday, January 15, 1967 



Lakeland Newspapers 13A 



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Landfi 



by CHARLES JOHNSTON 
Managing Editor 

Opposition to the proposed 
landfills in central Lake 
County is picking up steam. 
Ela and Fremont Twps. 
voted Monday night to op- 
pose the apllications by 
Waste Management to build 
a landfill and incinerator at 
Peterson Rd. and Rte. 83 
south of Grayslake and by 
ARF Landfill Corp. to ex- 
pand the capacity of its 
existing landfill by 105 acres, 
** also just south of Grayslake. 
The Villages of Mundelein' 
and Third Lake had 
previously stated their for- 
mal opposition to the 
proposals. 

The actions follow formal 
action by the Lake County 
Joint Action Solid Waste 
Planning Agency to oppose 
the proposals after its 
engineering firm reported on 
inadequacies in the 
petitions. 




orients Picking Up Steam 



The planning agency 
established six criteria upon 
which to make a recom- 
mendation on the landfills. 
The criteria are: 

-necessity of the facility to 
accommodate the waste 
needs of the area it serves. 

-that design, location and 
methods of operation will en- 
sure the protection of public 
health, safety and welfare. 

-that the facility will con- 
form to the character of the 
surrounding areas with a 
minimal impact on property 
values. 

-that the facility is sited 
outside the boundaries of the 
100-year flood plain or be 
flood-proofed in accordance 
with Illinois Dept. of Tran- 
sportation standards. 

-that it have minimal im- 
pact on existing traffic pat- 
terns. 

The engineering study was 
conducted by Graef, Anhalt, 
and Schloemer Assoc, Inc. 



of Milwaukee. The firm 
reported that both ap- 
plications were inadequate, 
based on these criteria. 

The report said that ARF's 
proposal was very 
inadequate in its plans for 
the transmission of con- 
taminants and leachates 
from the site via collection 
pipes. Seeking 99 percent ef- 
ficiency, the engineers 
graded the ARF proposal at 
12 percent efficiency. 

The firm gave Waste 
Management a much higher 
rating - 97- percent ef- 
ficiency, but said that plans 
for an incinerator by Waste 
Management • were in- 
complete and without suf- 
ficient data upon which to 
base a conclusion. 

Al Stob, director of 
facilities development and 
community relations for 
Waste Management 
said,"We're glad to see that 
communities are actively 



looking into this. We will sub- 
mit detailed information and 
testimony supporting our ap- 
plication at the hearing." 

Stob suggested that people 
attend the formal hearings 
because the testimony "will 

answer most of the questions 
that people have." 

He also pointed out that all 
formal testimony at the 
hearing becomes part of the 
formal record. 

Many of the local govern- 



mental bodies were waiting 
for the waste planning agen- 
cy to take formal action 
before making their own 
decisions. 

Although, at press time, 
the Village of Third Lake 
had not taken a formal vote 
to oppose the landfills, it did 
vote to give $2,000 to Citizens 
of Lake County for En- 
vironmental Action Reform 
(CLEAR), a citizens group 
which is opposing the land- 



fills. 

Other communities that 
are reported to be con- 
sidering a formal vote in op- 
position to the proposals are 
Round Lake Park, Liber- 
ty ville and Grayslake. 



Deep And Hot 

Death Valley, in southeast 
California, is 282 feet below 
sea level. It is the lowest 
point in the nation. 



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Helpful Civic informa- 
tion to acquaint you with 
your community. Call 
the Welcome Wagon 
representative so that 
she may visit you 

Grayslake 

Wildwood 

Lake Villa 

Lindenhurst 

Viola Reidel 

(312) 336-5971 

Round Lake 
Area 

Myrtle Klemens 
(312) 546-1617 

Mundelein 

Marion Butler 

(312) 362-1567 

You are entitled to a 
complimentary 
subscription from your 
hometown newspaper. 
To receive your paper 
contact your Welcome 
Wagon representative 
or Call Lakeland 
Newspapers at (312) 
223-8161 . 



Two Victory Centers Are Nearby 

In Case You Need Medical Care 




Victory Immediate 
Care Center 

For minor 
illnesses or injuries 

3477 Grand Avenue 

in Gurnee 

Gust west of Green Bay Road) 

Physicians on duty 
8 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
every day of the year 

Come in or call 
360-4100 



Victory Memorial Hospital 
Emergency Room 

For major trauma as well 
as minor illnesses and 
injuries 

1324 North Sheridan Road 
in Waukegan 

Physicians on duty 
24 hours a day 
every day of the year 

Come in or call 
360-4181 



Where you never need an appointment 









14A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



- ...:■ „^;.. . 



— -, . . ■ 






ACHS Lists Honor Roll 



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Antiqch Community High 
School has announced its 
honor roll for the first nine 
weeks of the 1986-87 school 
year. 

HIGH HONORS! 

Senior*: Robert Abboil , J«nnil«r Bonki, 
Michelle Barbour. Liio Bond, Mik« Breuer. 
Defer a Oynum, K«ilh Cortwnght, Down 
Doty. Richard Doly. John F«dor, Ginger 
forguton. Ronda Front, Thorn 01 G«ri, 
Suion Gllet. Jennifer Grlllin. Storey 
Howei. Chrutme Johnson, JaNery iocoi. 
Suion lopcra, Karen Undbloom. Thomas 
Mocek. Amy Molone. Julie MtBrody, Bill 
Mirowikl, Kelly Murray, Jeffrey Miction, 
Cindy Olten, Mkhelle Pantliki, Connie 
Perry. Dawn Priory, Matthew R*idcl 
Melody Bs.lmayer, Rxhard Ruck. Jock 
RuKh. Karon Schmehl, tindo Senfon, 
Angela Sm-iom Oiono Smith. Cindy 
Spronk. Cotln Steinke, Timothy Varna. 
Iroci Villa. Sherry Waldroup. Mkhelle 
Walk. Karen Weber, Joe Weitargaord. 
Michelle White and Teresa Whilloch. 

Junlari: Eleanor Allen, Paul Anderton, 
Trotl Atkinson. Brett Bennett. Melissa 
Brown, Phillip Brown, Richard Cancellare. 
John Ciko. Brian Clark. Jill' Curtis, Eric 
Detbient. 1™ Dkjmanlopoulot. David 
Doty. John Oydo. Mark Ellerbrock, Oovid 
Hollwat, Brodley Homlin. Gerrel Ham- 
mond. Kevin Hanrahan. Victoria Jackson, 
Andrea Kohler, Amy Kiruhenheiler, 
lorroine Kirwon. Fred Locher, John 
lundgren. timothy MrxDonakf, Roiemorie 
Mar iholl, James MtClure, Edward Mellier. 
Corinee Mltchen, Thomas Mueller, Sharon 
Murar. Vkkle Nflson. Jennifer Nolheller. 
Tobro Roy, Jerome Ruscko. Sean Sides. 
Karen Spronk. Robert Sykei ond Tommy 
Wagner. 

Sophomores: Edward Anlciok, Ronald 
Behnke, Andrew Berger, Jenniler Bunting. 
M<hiko Cowort, Catherine Ciopiewski. 
Benjamin DeMarllnl, Craig Dewar, Stacy 
Oewor. Michael Ferrara, Down Flood, 
Amanda Fritli, Steven Gouthler, Scott 
Gooch, Don Grote. Jennifer Haley. 
Deborah Herkh. Richard Helrkfc. Susan 
Hubbard. Morcella Jeiter, Rebecca John*. 
Deborah Kaiprowki. Crystal Kennedy, 
Oouglai Killian. Joton Koehler, Rebecca 
Kromer. Mkhoaf leltia. Kelli lelliih. 
Jonathan Medema, Chad Modra, Pamela " 
Oldenburger, Colleen Osmond. Aaron 
Plotter. William Redman, Angela Riedi. 
Ado ■ Ring. A leu it Rogola. Dawn Soh/ordt. 
Poul Smith, Thomat Slack, Tom Staerk, 
Jamie Stewart. Jenniler Theien. Chrit 
Vonderweel. Mkhelle Vitlman, Eugene 
Wagner, Koren William ton. Joanna 
Wilton, Klmberly Veaton, George 
Zuponeck, 

Preihmen: Kainen Adomctyk. Tonya 
Albert. Matthew Bonghi, Dean Bozato. 
linda Berkiel. Julie Brandt, Ouone 
Bulenichoen, Michael Cain, Oovid 
Clausen. John Cote, Matthew Dovidton, 
Philip Delaurenlit, Mirondo Flood, Jen- 
niler Forretl, Adam Grinde. Timothy 
Gunderton, Jennifer Harris. Brian Hovey, 
Elaine Johman. " Arthur Jordan. 
Christopher Koptalit, Dovkf Keller, Sue 
Kim. Deborah King. Alliton Lynch, Mkhaef 
Matson. Jenniler Morris.- Glen Otmond, 
Andrea Payne, Jean Potage, Thomat 
Reitth. Benjamin Rogert, Kurt Rohde. 
Jamet Roper. Klmberly Rota, Steven 
Ruicko. Jothua tone, Dlna Siller*, -Julie 
Skiypnyk, Ronald Taylor, ond Gregory 
Tiegren. 
HONOtSt 

Seniors: Chrit Adrianten, Deborah 
Albrecht, George Allen, Heidi Anderto«n, 
Joteph Applehant, Thomat Bach, Anne 
Bolet. Sutan Behling, Kristin Bell. Scott 
Bies, Kimberly Bighorn. Irene Bochnak, 
Mary Bod in, Mkhele Boermon. Deana 
Borlo. RebectO Bulenichoen, Down 
Syciek, Jodi Cordulf. Donald Chompley, 
Jenny Che i la Louren Chelerbok, Dona 
Chuk, Mkhelle Cotkey. Cindy Delano, 
Karen Dru»e, Lorial Drury, Paula Erkkian. 
Caroline tuner. Carrie Filher. Thomat 
Friel. Timothy Gognon, Jelfrey Gakla. 
Hormond Garwood. Thomat Gauthier, 
Todd Gedville, Sara Goettelmnn, Grello 
Gronmnger. Greg Gugel. Laurie Hort, 
Jomet Hernondei. John Higgint, Peter 
Horvolh, Sutonne Hueckttaedl, Donna 
Jackson, Klmberly Janun, Lisa Johnton, 
Tom Jonet, Erifca Jung, Kelly Kalter, 
Pamela Kotprowkt, Eda Kmohan. louro 
Knigge, 

Tamara Kraute, April Krueger, 
Chnttopnei Kuehn, Michael Lawrence, 
Deonno Mocavoy Jeanne Marth. Jennifer 
Mortholl, Medfard Matthews, Amy Me- 
Phe«, Suion Montrimat, Jeffrey Neut, Joe 
O'Connell. Amy CWion. Shereen Poull. 
Kimberly Pouly, Lita Pilklnglon, Shannon 
Ploughman, Brian Pomrening, Sean 
Romoge. Jill Ralkmen, Heidi Reulboth, 
Jacob Riettchel. Nino Rotquiil, Rut* 
Rotlkowtkl, lorl Schlichl-ng. Julie Sexton. 
Debro Sigler, Alice ' Skrypnyk, Jelfrey 
Sokultki. Jenniler Stoerk, Tom Stafford, 
Heather Slanek, Karen Steven*. Valerie 
Slrouheia. Andrew Trieger. Eric Van- 
Patten, Joton Vaughn, Sarah Vogt, Sherri 
Wol*h, Gregory Werba, Oavid 
Wetlergoard, Jeffrey Wiegel, Jennifer 
Wimberly, Darren Wall, Jelfrey Wolf. 
Fronk Zeien, 

Junlari: Joton Aker. Shonda Appell, 
Mkhele Arger; Edward Beron, Brenda 
Betke, lance Browne, Julie Clark. Deborah 
Coatar, Kristin* Cormaney, Suianne 
Debruhl, Brett DeRoutte, Rkh Deultch, 
Debbie Dreltke. Klmberly Einhorn. Scotl 
Eitele, Joel Gtidden, Joton Gufke, lita 
Hennetty, Wendy Jemen, Kathleen Jone*. 
Joton Kennedy, Carmen Knulton, Jill 
LoFleur. Kevin Moginn, Brett Moher, Amy 
Mark. Scoti Meyer. Vincent ONail, 
Brandon Parkhunl. Chrl* Polarh, Cindy 
Qumn E/kh Hkhler. Condi Schmin, 
Stephanie Seemann. Matt Sexton, 
Chrittopher Shea, Joanne Shinellug, Erk 
Shoemaker, Rertee Slereckl, Christ! 
Skinner, Philip Smeri, Kale Stack, Jettko 
Trovilllon, RkoTurco.and Diana Vellmon. 
Sop homer e-i i Kim Anderton. Michael 
Boblo, Tracy Borne*, Scotl Bond, Brenda 
ftorla . Derek Bortky, Melinda Breuer, Kelly 
Coin. Mkhelle Chlero. Pamela Erkkton, 
Joe Fikejt , Thomat Fry, Chrit Giebelhaut, 
Eliiabelh Glenn. Michael GoUbrowtkl. 
Joton Goodman, Vktoria Gradowtkl, 
Saroh Gray, Krlttal Gutl, Jennifer Hague. 
Dawn Humphrey, Randy Jean*. Rochet 
Jennlngt. Robert Johnton, Dona Jane*, 
Tommy Hammer, Jeremy Koulh, Itike 
I and I, ond A lie io lavkjne. 



Kelly Maple. Jackie Meyer*. Rachel 
Moreti, Heather Notion, Mvfinda Nelton, 
Jill Oiga, Kimberly Perry. Hope Reidel. 
Brian Rubath, Michelle Schmidtke. 
Mkhael Schuli, Carole Schwortt. Tracy 
Searle April Shone, Renos Simkut, 
Jennifer Slahmer, Carrie Taylor. Donno 
Telmtkl, Gregory Vine, joteph Walth. 
Ryan Ward, Eliiabelh Watert. Polrkia 
Werhane. Mark Woinktk, Boil Vounl and 
Kolty Zeien. 

Frethmen: Koren Adam*. Mark Appell, 
Chad Athley, Elaine Bakula. Jill Bankt. 
Samuel Barnet, Gilbori Barrienloi. 
Chrittopher Beatlie, Ken Bell, Mkhelle 
Birkenmeyer, Michelle Buchla. Coryn 
CotteMonai. Lynelte Chrltlenton. Scott 
Clmoglio. Eric Citladlno. Nkolo Corrit. 
Wendy Cotkey. Danielle Cullen. Jutio 
Davit, Mkhelle Degen. Laura Delano. 
Cynthia Dewar. Dawn Drute; Janel Eckert. 
Cynthia Ellering. Debro Engle. Angela 
Eiarhokoi, Ken Forrara, Tracy Filigerald. 
David Galda, Carol Goldine, Ray 



Gallagher, Stephen Goelielmuii, Holly 
Good, Sheryl Gordon, Jenniler Gortki, 
Kinlen Granberg, Dawn Gunyntki. and 
Mkhelle Honten. 

Brian Herman, Patancia Holly, Mork 
Holttrorn. Jennifer Hribar, Andrew 
Johnton. Carrie Kacen. Date Kandrioro. 
Karen Karotintki, Wendy Koehler, Silvia 
Krueger, John langdon. Jeremy Lee, 
Gregg Locher. Vincent Lotocco. Edward 
Moginn. Dlmitriot Maravelat. Kenneth 
Molltan. Sutan McAloon. Wandy Meyer, 
Hope Miller, Heather Morritey. Michelle 
Nerini, Nicole Nerml, Alox Neul. 
Chrittopher Parker, Dan Pierce, Daniel 
Pinko. Mkhelle Pletikewycr, Carry 
Potion. Kelly Promthaler, Angela Rauch, 
Joteph Rohde. Doug Ropo. Timothy 
Rudolph. Diane Schlipper, Pamela Schoen. 
Gregory Shanr, Andrew Shoemaker, 
Jenniler Sigler. Sherri Stephenson. 
Michael Styikol. Jaion Todd. Tonya 
Tointon. David Wetton. Kimberly White. 
Angelo Williamt, Valeria Wolf. Barbara 
Wunn, ond Beth Ztellntki, 





One Two Three And ... 

Sam Lombardo, Director of the American Association 
of Retired Persons Ail-Star Kitchen Band and president 
of the Antioch area A.A;R;P. prepares to conduct 
during a 'jam' session at the Antioch Senior Citizen's 
Center — photo by Patty Korom. 



Along the way 
with ANNIE MAE 



Well, the season's first real snow is finally here. 

I had the most wonderful chat with two gals over at the 
P.M. and L, Theatre the other day. The renovation to the 
building is going nicely, it's ah been structural work until 
now, making the building safer. They have really worked 
hard to get that building in shap 

Don't miss P.M. and L's opening of Angel Street on Feb. 6. 

I would like to sharca note that one of my readers sent 
after reading last week's column. 

Dear Annie Mae, 

I just want to point out that if you had been on the Channel 
Lake, you would have noticed that the noisy snowmobiles 
were involved in races sponsored by a local resort.This is 
something that we residents get to hear every Sunday. 

The people out riding just for pleasure are no more an- 
noying the boaters in the summer. Also, the ice fishermen 
are not entirely without fault. Every Spring when the ice 
melts we are the reluctant recieplents of all their garbage 
(i.e., cans, lines, hooks, old pails, and assorted slyrafoam 
containers) which is blown onto our shore. 
P.S. Take a look at the ice after the ice fishing derby, you 
could fill a garbage truck with what is left behind. 
A Channel Lake Resident 

If this is the case, and trash is being left on the ice, then the 
people that are doing it should be ashamed of themselves. 

Did anyone notice the young ladies and gentlemen with 
movie earners equipment down by the sawmill on Sunday? 

The aspiring movie makers were from California's Loyola- 
Marymount college and they were working on a project for 
their master's degree program. 

One young man, who was obviously freezing, told me that 
he had never seen snow other then at a ski resort. Three of 
the student's were from California and two were from North 
Dakota. 

Congratulations to Don Skidmore.'new president of the 
Lions Club. As this will be the Lions 50th anniversary year, 
we can look forward to a lot of exciting programs from them. 

Annie Mae is interested in obtaining any old written 
memoribilia having to do with the Antioch Lions, please send 
photo copies of anything you might have. ' 




Athlete Of The Week 

Antioch Basketball player, Tom Wells has been selected as the "Athlete of the 
Week" for his performance in six games over the Christmas holidays. Glenn 
Hendrickson, representing the State Bank of Antioch, is shown with a check for $50 
that is being contributed in Tom's name to the Antioch High School Parent Teacher 
Scholarship fund. Don Zeman, Varsity Basketball Coach, is also present. 

Men With Sunglasses 
To Perform At School 



by CAUOLYN HAMMOND 

(312) 3954081 

There was a certain 
amount of smugness and a 
sense of retribution from 
Bear fans in Antioch this 
week as the Giants shut out 
the Redskins. Guess that's 
what they mean about the 
thrill of victory and the 
agony of defeat, folks. Ain't 
that too bad-aaah! 

It sure was a pleasure to 
read and reread newcomer 
Edy Bein's "Letter to the 
Editor" in last week's issue 
praising our town. It's nice 
to see through someone 
else's eyes the things we 
take for granted. Sometimes 
during the hustle and bustle 
of life we forget that quite 
the same reasons led most of 
us to make and continue to 
call Antioch our home. 

Mothers of small children, 
do you need a babysitter? 
Short on funds? Can you wat- 
ch someone else's child in 
return? That's the mission of 
a local babysitting co-op, ac- 
cording to Peggy Castillo, a 
member of the group which 
has been in operation for 
three years. No fee is 
charged; members give 
equal time for that they use 
on an exchange system. 
Members are able even to 
hold part-time jobs. For 
more information you may 
call (312)395-5923. 

Don't forget the wonderful 



"Ribs N'Bibs" dinner to 
benefit,. St. Peter's School 
athletic program to be held 
Saturday, Jan. 17 at St. 
Peter's Social Center. Ser- 
ving time will be from 5 to 8 



members and $4 for non- 
members at the door. Ad- 
vance tickets are available 
at a reduced price. 

Boy Scout Troop 190 will 
hold a fundraising pancake 



Notes & News 



p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults 
and $3 for children. 

Antioch High School 
wrestlers continue to "jour- 
ney to the tourney." Winning 
four of their last six meets, 
they will travel to meet Zion- 
Benton on Friday, Jan. 16 
and will face Warren, 
Crystal Lake South, and 
Waukegan East at Warren 
on the 17th. Coming soon on 
Friday, Jan. 23 will be 
Parents* Night. The Pom 
Pon girls and the Men in 
Sunglasses will perform. 

Also coming soon is the Ac- 
tive Adults of Tomorrow 
Video Lock-In. They will be 
locked-in (not out) at 7 p.m. 
at St. Peter's Social Center 
on Saturday, Jan. 24 and 
won't be able to leave until 7 
a.m. Sunday, Jan. 25. Of 
course, that won't be a 
problem, because movies 
will be shown throughout the 
12-hour period. For reser- 
vations call (312)395-3236. 
Tickets will be available at 
the door. Cost is $3.50 for 



breakfast/lunch from 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 25 
at St. Peter's School. Tickets 
are $3 for adults, $2 for 
children and under four free. 



1 —LEGAL — 

PRIVATE 

FOUNDATION 

ANNUAL REPORT 

Pursuant to Section 
6104(d) of the Internal 
Revenue Code, notice is 
hereby given thai the an- 
nuo! report of the un- 
dersigned private foun- 
dation, is available at the 
foundation's principal ol- 
lice during regular 
business hours upon 
request by any citizen 
within 160 days after the 
date of this publication. 

Fiscal Year Ended 
November 30, 1986. 

The Schrooder Foun- 
dation. 410 North i' 
Michigan Avenue, Room 
590, Chicago, Illinois 
60611. Principal Manager 
Charles E. Schrooder. 



Students Score High In 
Math League Contest 



January 15. 1987 
187C-254.AR 



"Simultaneously, three 
satellites began to orbit the 
earth at constant speeds. 
When the first completed x 
orbits, it had made 80 more 
orbits than the second and 
100 more than the third. 
When the second completed 
x orbits, it had made 25 more 
orbits than the third. Find 
x." 

The Math Team students 
of Antioch High School had 
30 minutes, to answer this 
and five other questions 
during contest number three 



of the Illinois Math League. 

Rick Ruck answered alt 
six questions correctly and 
following closely behind with 
five correct were Jim Mc- 
Clure, John Fedor, Cindy 
Spronk and Jerry Ruscko. 
That gave a team score (the 
top five) of 26. In all, 29 
students participated in the 
contest. 

It has been three years sin- 
ce anyone at ACHS achieved 
a six on any of these con- 
tests, where sometimes to 



even answer one correctly is 
quite an accomplishment. 

The Math Team also par- 
ticipates in the Atlantic- 
Pacific Math League con- 
tests and cohosts the An- 
tioch-Warren Math In* 
vitational competition 
coming up on Feb. 26, and 
competes in the lllinos Coun- , 
cil of TEachers of 
Mathematics (ICTMV spon- 
sored ontests. 

By the way, the answer to 
the above problem is 400. 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 5A 



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Storming The Center 



Over 100 firemen from 19 Lake County fire departments fought fire which 
destroyed Rustic Manor Jan. 9. Blaze started at 6:55 a.m. and consumed center of 
building. Landmark Gumee restaurant has had rough year, suffering extensive 
damage from September floods. Restaurant reopened several weeks before 
fire. — Photo by Mark Benno 

IRS To Hold Seminars 
On Withholding Change 



J.R. Starkey, Internal 
Revenue Service (IRS) Dist. 
director for northern Illinois, 
Informed imployers that the 
IRS has scheduled eight 
seminars to familiarize 
them with the new 1987 Form 
W-4 filing requirements. 

"Under the new Tax 
Reform Act of 1986, all em- 
ployees will be required to 
complete a new Form W-4, 
Employee's Withholding 
Allowance Certificate," he 
siad. "These seminars have 
been arranged so that em- 
ployers will be able to help 
their own employees 
prepare these forms ac- 
curately and completely." 

Because of significant 
changes in the tax laws 



which became effective oh 
Jan. 1, the amount of tax 
which is currently being 
withheld from most em- 
ployees' salaries is not 
correct. Many wage earners 
will be receiving larger 
paychecks because of lower 
federal withholding tax 
rates. "Consequently," 
Starkey concluded, "we are 
advising individuals to file 
new Forms W-4 as soon as 
possible to aboid being sub- 
stantially under-withheld 
later in the year." 

The IRS estimates that 
about half of all employees 
will only need to complete 
the first five lines on the 
form.. Others who have more 
complicated tax situations 



will be requireed to complete 
additional sections of the 
form. 

These seminars will be 
held Jan. 21 and 22, at the 
Moody Church, 1609 N. 
LaSalle St., Chicago. There 
will be morning and af- 
ternoon seminars on Jan, 21 
and a morning session on 
Jan. 22. Additional seminars 
will be conducted in the 
auditorium at the Stale of 
Illinois Building, 100 W. Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, Jan: 27 
and 29, and Feb. 3, 10, and 12, 
from 10a.m. until noon. 

To register call the IRS at 
(800) 424-1040, weekdays 
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. All 
seminars will be conducted 
by experienced IRS' tax 
specialists. 



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Pro Athletes Begin To 
Flex Political Muscle 



b> JOHN STEINKE 

There was a time when we would have 
laughed at the notion of an ex-athlete in 
government. Johnny (Blood) McNally, a Pro 
Football Hall of Fame halfback, was soundly 
defeated in a bid for county sheriff in his 
native Minnesota in the 1940s. "No one took 
me seriously," McNally said later. His plat- 
form promis ed a return to honest wrestling. 

Steinke 

On Politics 



On the basketball court, Big George Mikan 
was rated as "the greatest basketball player 
of the first hair century" for his exploits as a 
member of the Minneapolis (now Los 
Angeles) Lakers. In 1956, Mikan ran as a 
Republican against incumbent Represen- 
tative Roy Wier in Minnesota's Third 
Congressional Dist. Mikan rode around town 
on the back or a "youth truck" shooting 
baskets to attract the crowds. Wier com- 
mented on Mikan's candidacy: "I'd be as 
lost on the basketball court as Mikan would 
be in politics." The voters agreed and Mikan 
fouled out in the end, losing to Wier. 

Another basketball player of lesser renown 
was Wallace ("Wan Wah") Jones, who ran 
for Congress on the Republican ticket again- 
st Democratic incumbent John Watts in Ken- 
tucky's 6th Dist. in 1956. Jones' chief 
qualification for office wa^ being one of two 
honest members on the bribe-ridden 1948 
Kentucky basketball team. Players Alex 
Groza, Dale Barnstable and Ralph Beard all 
admitted accepting bribes to shave points. 
Since most people think politics is a dirty 
business, Jones' incorruptible conduct on the 
basketball court seemed an attractive asset 
for a candidate. Watts won re-election 
because the basketball fans couldn't carry 
the day for Jones at the polls. 

The advent of television, weakening party 
loyalties, independent voting patterns and 
the public adulation of athletes has tran- 
sformed the jock bloc Into viable political 
candidates. Lee Atwalcr, director of George 



Bush's 1988 presidential campaign, admits; 
"Athletes might well be the new American 
heroes. . .who can transcend party 
loyalties." 

Ray Dsdinger of Th? Spaninft Srin writes: 
"We are capable or voting for images rather 
than issues, throwing our support behind 
candidates we like for reasons that have lit- 
tle or nothing to do with their politics. We 
have* elected military heroes (Theodore 
Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower) and a 
movie star (Ronald Reagan) in this country. 
Why not an athlete? Think about it.. What 
film role do we associate with Reagan? 
George Gipp, a football player. The ex- 
athlete has a natural rapport with TV audien- 
ces; the networks and advertisers realized 
that long ago. Today, jocks are all over the 
tube as play-by-play announcers, color 
analysts, commercial spokesmen and ac- 
tors. It stands to reason that if these guys can 
sell beer and flowers, they can sell them- 
selves in this age of electronic politics." 

A RWiifi#f<jfi Urrhi? article contends: 
"Perhaps it's because professional sports 
are so much like big business, and that big 
business is so much like the media, and the 
media ae so much like politics. But for 
whatever reason, the transition from locker 
room to Oval Office seems very reasonable 
these days. . .There was a time when 
political accomplishment brought fame. 
Now the process has been reversed." 

Former LaSalle basketball great Tom 
Gola was elected to the Pennsylvania state 
legislature in 1966, and then won the race for 
Philadelphia city controller four years later. 
In 1983, Gola lost the Republican nomination 
for mayor of Philadelphia. He enunciated the 
basic tenet of a successful politician: "The 
name helps, no question about it. You'd be 
surprised how many (voters) step into the 
booth and don't know anything about the can- 
didates. They look at the list and if they 
recognize your namc-whether it's for sports 
or whatever-chances are they'll vote for 
you." Winning candidates realize that name 
recognition is 80 percent of a successful cam- 
paign. It's better to be roasted than ignored. 

(Second of a series.) 



What Impact Does Tax 

Reform Have On You And 

Your Investments? 

The Illinois Company 

Cordially invites you to a discussion on what tax reform means 
and how it could affect your investments. 

Date: January 21, 1987 

Time: 10:00 a.m.-ll:30 a.m. or 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. 

Location: The Illinois Company 

221 Washington Street 
Waukegan 

RSVP: (312) 623-0245 
There is no charge for the seminar. However, seating is limited. 



Man to: The mj no j s Company 

Member NYSE • Member SfPC 

221 Washington Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

□ I accept your invitation. Please reserve seating for 

□ I cannot attend, but I would like a Prospectus and related 
information on The Illinois Company. 

Name ' __ 



Address 



City 



State. 



- Zip 



Business Phone ( ). 
Home Phone( )__ 



i 

• 



f 16ALoKetand Newspapers 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



I ' 






m 



?87 




Call (312) 223-8161 For Ad Action 




HOMES FOR SALE 



HOMES FOR SUE 



BUYERS AND sellers come 
together every week In 
Lakeland Classified. 



' HOMES FOR SALE 

_ 

MARKETPLACE for smart 
shoppers, that's Lakeland 
Classified. 



IMMACULATE ONE OWNER Unique two family 
resident In one of the most desirable areas -of 
Gurnee. 5 bedrooms, 3 baths for large family. 
Smaller 2 bedroom, 1 Vt baths for In-laws or rental 
$189,000. 

TWO (2) COMMERCIAL LOTS LOCATED ON 
WASHINGTON STREET In growing Round Lake 
Park, lot 9—16,900 lot 10—15,900. 

ED BLACHANIEC REALTORS 

Ask for Frank A. Joclus for more detail! 

OFFICE: (312) 249-4190 OR (312) 623 -0B 54 
HOME: (312) 336-3312 

If TOUR 10OHNC TO BUILD A HVH HOIK, SK FUM-ftTU BIHID ON TOM 1 01 OR OUH. 



FOR THE discriminating 
home buyer making the 
big move. Drive by 5411 
Keystone in northern 
Illinois'* largest antique 
town, Richmond. Hillside 
brick 3 bedroom ranch on 3 
plus acres, shown by ap- 
pointment only. Mid 
SIOO's. Quality 

craftsmanship. To 'see, or 
for brochure, call 

(815)675-2110 

1-5-90 

OPTION-LAND contract. 
Executive home, three 
bedroom, two bath, full 
basement, brick and field 
stone, 1000 sq. ft. Nine 
year otd ranch In excellent 
condition on secluded one 
acre near Richmond. 
Available Immediately. 
Why rent when you can 
live in your own home? 
Willing to work with a sin- 
cere buyer. Call now! 
$79,900 Brokers protected. 
NEILM. • 

(815)678-4334 

1.4.B6 

FIND A JOB, or fill a lob 
with Lakeland Classified. 



RENTAL INCOME-WAREHOUSE 

10.000 iq. leet warahouie-has earnings of $20,000 per 
year, pay* for Itielf. Ideal for Investors looking lor good 
cashflow. Don't miss this one, coll today..... .$120,000 

FOR AIL YOU BOATING BUFFS- 

Don't wane your week-end* , looking tor motel rooms. 
Nice 2 bedroom condo featuring 2 level*. Deck ond polio 
too. Best of all. Pier rental Is available, with occess lo the 
enllro Chain of Lakes. Also features 24 hr. security gate, 
tennis courts, swimming pool. Summers coming, get 
ready now S34.9Q0 

HIGH AND DRY 

Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 balh lokofronl homo on peaceful 
Lake Mlltmore in Lake Villa. Large kitchen with plenty of 
coblnels, formal dining room, oversize family room. with 
fireploce. Intercom system throughout ond central 
vacuum too. A brick beauty for...... .1124,000. 

COUNTRY CHARMER 

Check out the cheerful kitchen with tho corner windows 
overlooking your I aero yard In nice 2 bedroom home, 
There's a large living room plus 2 good slxo bedrooms 
with plenty of closets. Breexewoy connects house and 
garage. Don't delay, coll us today to see this great buy 
for only.... $75,000 

Many vacant parcels are also available II you are looking 
for that perfect homesite to build on. Choice of areas, 
many to choose from. Call today for more details. 



REALTY 



ILLINOIS & WISCONSIN 

(312) 395-8600 

959 MAIN ST. ANTIOCH, IL 



THINKING OF SELLING 

TOUR HOME? 

Price it right. For a 
free market analysis, 
call today! 

Debbie 

Century 21 

Tom Ward & Associates 

(312)356-S0LD 



TWIN LAKES 

Visit New 
Wick Mods) Home 

JANUARY SPECIAL 

Choice Of 2 Appliances 

FREE 

For More Information Call 

LAKE \m BUILDERS 

(414) 877-2884 

Or Visit MtKtel At 

309 W. Main St. 
Twin lakes, Wl. 



You need o pro . » » 



NEW 
LISTING 



flW-EXOULINT eUYLt bedroom 
Townhouse, IV) bolht, fireplace, 
maislve moiler suite, central air plui 
oil appliance*. Just listed at 147.300, 
POEtPOt, INC (313) 360-9333 



fiS? 



-tie! 



f>09-GuRNCE CONDO-Juit like new. In 
excellent condition. Two bedrooms. 
two both*. I •shaped' Irving room/dining 
room combination, lots of cloul space 
Owner anxious. Colt nowl 
POIeVPOt, INC. (312) 360.9333 



fl07<ONiEMfO*AirY LAWFRONT. 
Cedar tided home on East loon taki 
wlih 2-3 bedrooms, 3Vi boihi. 60 It. 
frontage on the lake. Custom bit. large 
kitchen with oak cabinet! and 
break I at i bar. living room with 
lireploxe. coso bianco ton I track 
lighting. 1134.900. 

POI 4 POL INC QUI 32341178 



»ll04AXIfK>NT-Kigh on o bluL. 
overlooking the lake It Ihli older home 
with ft rooms. 3 baths. Colllomla owner 
wonts otter. Needs some work but has 
a beovlilul 73' wooded sitting. Make 
oiler. Asking (W.C00. 
POI * POI. INC (313|233->17t 



- #1 



flat) 

Executive cedor tided quodlevel on I 
acre. Huge living room wtlh beamed 
CothedroT celling, formal dining ream, 
targe kitchen with attached Florida 
room, 4 bedroomi, 2'A baihi I family 
room with .fireplace) plus boiement. 
•196.000. 
*OI L POI, INC (313) 393-7313 



NEW 
LISTING 



III I -NEW LISTING— Cory 3 bedroom 
home on targe lot features cheerful kit- 
chen, oak coblnels, 3 car goroge. 
blacktop drive. Lake rights to the 
Chain. (63,000. 
POI l> POt, INC (313) 393-7313 



POE 



Grayslake 
(312)223-8178 

Waukegan 
(312)662-1021 



INC. 
REALTORS 



Gurnee 
(312)360-9333 

Antloch 
(312)395-7313 



HOMES FOR SALE 



REPOSSESSED homes from 
government from $1.00 
plus repairs/taxes. 
Throughout Illinois/natio- 
nwide! Also tax 
properties. 

(216)453-3000 

ext. H212I 

1-3-3 



L 



HOMES WANTED 



WE BUY HOUSES 
FOR ALL CASH 

Ermac 
Investments 
(312)587-8234 



LOTS AND PROPERTY 



FARM TO RENT 

21 acres at Route 60 
and Fairfield. $S0/acre. 

VENTURA 

(312) 669-5255 



1 



7 BUSINESS 
PROPERTY FOR RENT 



WAUCONDA 

Now Modern Office 

Space Available) , 

1S00 Sq-Foet 

Will Divide 

2 Months Ron! Free 

With Lease 

MILLER SALES 

0*1% (313) 628-8200 

Etestlexs (312) 528-2318 



WAUCONDA OFFICES 

85 to 600 square feet. 
All utilities Included. 
From $75 per month. 

(312} 724-7266 Daft 

(312) 446-2672 Ev.ninp 

and Waiktnd* 



s APARTMENTS 
FOR RENT 

1 ROOM kitchenette on 
wesl shore of Grass Lake. 
$65 per week, plus security 
deposit. 

(312)587-2868 

-8-3-121 

COZY 3 room apartment. 
Stove and refrigerator, all 
utilities Included. Prefer 
working male. Available 
Jan. 15, 1987. $325 per 
month, plus security. 

(312)587-1920 

8-3-57 

BUYERS AND sellers come 
together every week In 
Lakeland Classified. 



•LYNWOOD APTS* 
Newly Redecorated 

One bedroom, Round lake 
apartment, carpeted, air condi- 
tion, coble. All utilities except 
electric. $3*0 per month, Mo 
dogs. Must be with present 
employer al least 6 months. 

(312)546-5151 

6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 



GRAYSLAKE 

New, luxury 1 and 2 
Bedroom apart* 
ments. Dining Room, 
air conditioning, ap- 
pliances, wall fo wall 
carpeting, laundry 
facilities, Balcony or 
Patio. Located In 
private country set- 
ting. Walk to town 
ana commuter train, 
Route 120, 1 mile 
west of Route 83. 
Available now rental 
units from $435. 

Call for Appointment 

URUIS WMGEHEKT 

(312) 680-7700 




WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for on employer or an em- 
ployee, -Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success. 



APARTMENTS 
FOR RENT 



HOUSE HUNTING? Find 
ust the home you're 
ooking for In Lakeland 
Newspapers' Classified. 
(312)223-8161 




THE BEST IN 
COUNTRY LIVING 

Reduced Security Deposit 
Plus On© Month Free Rent* 

Spacious one and two bedroom apartments. Available for 
Immediate occupancy, wall to wall carpet, color corr- 
dianted appllonces, laundry facilities and storage 
available. Small pets welcome In selected apartments. 

Chain O'Lakes Nearby 
Senior Citizen Discount 

(312)587-9277 

'Resirlctlofii Apply 
I.PM. 



APARTMENT FOR rent. 
Waukegan, furnished, 1 
bedroom, 6 month tease 
and security deposit. No 
pets. 

{312)336-6373 

8-3-2 

GURNEE 2 bedroom apart- 
ment, close to lollway , but 
country atmosphere. 
Newly decorated. 
Available Immediately. 
$450 plus heat and electric. 
(312)746-8421 

8-3-19 



■1.-A 




I 



6 BUSINESS 
PROPERTY FOR SALE 



BUSINESS 
FOR SALE 



PROPERTY 



FOR LEASE OR SALE 



1 



ROUND LAKE Beach. 3 
bedroom, 2 car garage, 
available now. $525/ 
$625. 

(312)392-4020 
9.4.3 

ANTIOCH, 2 bedroom 
home, 1 car garage. 
$460/month. 

(312)395-1430 
-9-3-53- 



Grayslake-General Business Zoned 
Brick 2 story building-5,000 sq. ft.-2 
floors. Air conditioned with gas hot 
water heat, heavy duty electrical in- 
put. Good downtown location, I 
GREAT opportunity to begin your 
own business at reasonable rate. 
Large parking area. Lease at $1000 
per month or buy for $89,900. 

POE & POE 

(Formerly Murrie & Behm Realtors) 
352 Center St.*Graysiake, IL. 

(312)223-8178 



ROUND LAKE. 3 bedroom 
home, full basement, 
newly pointed. $525/ 
month. 

(312)395-1430 

: 9-3-54 

1 BEDROOM house. East 
Loon Lake area, 1 block 
from lake with lake rights. 
Stove, refrigerator, gas 
heat. Occupancy February 
1, 1987. $365 per month 
plus utilities. 1 month 
security necessary. 
(312)587-4459 

9.3.56 

3 BEDROOM home in 
Round Lake Beach. Walk to 
schools and shopping. $400 
per month, 1 month 
security deposit, avoiloble 
now. v -. 
(312)599-7556 
9-4-122 

FIND A JOB, or fill a lob 
with Lakeland Classified. 




lakeland V*lassif ied 
Directory 



11 

Result Getting 

LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS 

Covering the Rapidly 

Growing Lakeland 

Bi-State Area of 

Lake County, 

McHenry County 

and Kenosha County 

Classified 
Deadline 

Business Ads 

-Tuesday 1 1 a.m. 

Private Party Ads 

-Tuesday Noon 



REAL ESTATE GUIDE 

1 - Homes For Sal* 

2 ■ Home* Wanled 

3 ■ Rul Estate Wanted 
A ■ Lots 4 Property 

5 - Mobil t Homes 

6 • Business Property 

for Sale 

7 • Business Property 

For Rent 

8 • Apartments For Rent 

9 • Houses For Rent 
10- Rentals Wanted 

11 • Cemetery Lots 

12 • Buildings 

13 - Slorata 

EMPLOYMENT GUIDE 

14 • Schools And Instruction 

15 • Employment Agencies 

1 6- Child Care Wan led 
17 -Child Cut Ottered 
18 -Situations Wanled 



19 • Kelp Wanted Part-Tim* 

20 • Help Wanted Full Tim* 

21 • Business Opportunities 

MARKET GUIDE 
24 • lionin| t Scwlnt 
25 -Carpentry 

26 • Electrical 

27 • Plumbinc 
21 - Palnllni & Decorating 

29 • Heatinf. t Air Conditioning 

30 - Appliance Repair 
31- Radio & TV Repair 

32 • Professional Services 

33 • Ltfal Services 

34 • Tai Services' 

35 ■ Laundry & Cleaning 

36 • General Services 

37 - Landscaping 

38 • Roofing & Siding 

39 • Blacktop 

40 • Concrete 1 Cement 
41 -Building Materials 



S5 -Wanted 
EG • Auctions 

67 ■ Notices 

68 - Personals 
69 -Lost 

70 -Found 

71 - Giveewir 

72 - Money To Lend 

73 - Loans Wanled 
75 -Car Pool! 

76 - Boats & Motors 



PtyuMMlt In advance li required 
forlhohseiaeUt 

Advertisers Ovl ol lakeland circula- 
tion oreo • Buslnesi Opportunist * 
Goroge ond Moving Soles • Debt 
Dliclqim«n • Mobile Homvi • Situa- 
tions Won red • Found and 
Giveaway Ads Are) P r ••. 



aura 



W*lcom» Hero 



42 • Recreation Guide 
43 -Business Supplies 

1 Equipment 
44 - Pet Grooming 

& Bonding 
47 -Horses 
48 • Farm Animals 
49 -Good Things To Ett 

50 . Firewood 

51 - Pals 4 Supplies 

52 • Musical Instruments 
53 -Antiques (Crafts 

54 • Baiears 

55 • Garage t Rummage 
Sales 

56 ■ Swap & Eiehange 
57 -Thrift lea 
58 • Miscellaneous 
59- Clothing 

60 - Cameras 

61 - Furniture 

62 - Computer And 
Video Games 

63- Toys 

64 • Sports Equipment 
Lokelond News popart reserves the. right la properly classify alt 
advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, or re|e<t any 
odvertleemenl lor credit or policy reasons. 

Alt Help Wonted (advertising Is published under unified headings . 
Lokelond Newspapers does nal knowingly accept Help Wanted 
advertising t hoi In any way violates the Human Right t Act. 

ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the- FIRST Insertion dale. In she eveni ol an 
error or ommlsilon, Lokelond Newspapers will be responsible lor 
ONLY the FIRST incorrect Insertion. The newspaper will be responsi- 
ble lor only the portion ol the ad that Is In error. Please notlly (he 
Clasiltled Deportment In the event ol on error. CANCELLATIONS 
must be mode prior to Noon on the Tuesday before publication.; 



AUTOMOTIVE GUIDE 

77 • Recreational Vehicles 

Vans 

Motorcycles 

Trucks 4 Trailer* 

Auto Repair' 

Auto Parts 

Autos (Rent and Leasing) 

foreign Autos For Sale 

Domestic Autos Tor Site 

Autos Wanled 

Snowmobiles 



78- 
79- 

80- 
81- 
82- 
83. 
84- 
85- 
86- 
87- 



Thursday, January 1 5. 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 17A 



. ._ ,.. .- i - • 



ri,V r, -v\lrf5BBM-*»Sit»tnjfftft' m 



i tf WW * « ■+ ■ ■ ' 



.& 




LOTS OF room. . Large 
riverfront house to share 
■ on 1 1/4 acres. Canoe, ski, 
bicycle, swim within 5 
minutes. Large yard, 
stove, fireplace. 2 car 
garage, non-smoker. Age 
18 to 35 years. Male or 
female. $200 per month. 
(414)689-6246 

-9.4.118 

2 BEDROOM lakefront 
home. $450 per month plus 
heat. 1 month security 
deposit required. 

(312)587-8311 

^9-3- 120 

EXECUTIVE home-Option 
to purchase. Throe 
bedroom, two both, full 
basement, 2'/i car at- 
tached garage, 1800 sq. ft. 
Nine year old brick ranch 
on secluded one acre site 
near Richmond. Available 
for short or long term 
lease, home in excellent 
condition. $750/month. 
NEILM. 

(815)678-4334 
-9-4-87 



FIND A JOB, or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 
(312)223-8161 



POLE BUILDINGS 

Horse Barns, 

Riding Arenas, 

Storage & Commercial 

Buildings 

and Fencing. 

15 Years Experience 

Call Fred Doane at 

(414) 728-9006 

Doane 

Brothers 

Construction 




\ 



it 



ANTIOCH RESIDENTS 
EARN S$$ 

Working as a temporary. 
Need interested males and 
females for light industrial 
work. Bonuses, insurance 
and vacation pay available. 
Call now! 






^f$ 



JOBS/VICTOR TEIPORM 
SERVICES 



W10IEUI (112) 33M1M 
UBE1TTYILLI (112) 3174110 




PROFESSIONAL full time 
child core needed for 2 
month old infant in 
Grayslake/Thlrd Lake 
area. References required. 
(312)223-8369 

16-3-1 

PART TIME babysitter 
needed in my Grayslake 
home. Monday, Wed- 
nesday, Friday, 2 la 6 p.m. 
Call for more information. 
(312)223-3271 

16-3-17 



NEED EXTRA money? 
Friendly Home Toy Parties 
has immediate openings 
for managers and demon- 
slrators in this area. Free 
kiti. It's easy and fun. We 
hove 600 exciting gifts and 
toys featuring the new 
animated talking doll 
"Cricket" which was ad- 
vertised on national TV. 
Plus new for 1987 a full 
catalog of special Christ- 
mas items. Kits are free so 
there is no cosh in- 
vestment, no delivering, 
no collecting and no ser- 
vice charge. Work in your 
spore time. No experience 
necessary. 

1 -{800)227-1510 

19-6-48 

MARKETPLACE for smart 
shoppers, that's Lakeland 
Classified. 



LUNCH 
DISHWASHER 

4 weekdays, a week. 

Apply In Person 
PBATSER'S SILVER SADDLE 

■iu<i 83 and Contt SwmI 

Or Coll: 

(312) 223-8424 



19 HELP WANTED 
PART-TIME 



THINK SUMMER! Join the 
'Illinois National Guard 
now and get a summer job 
learning to be a soldier. If 
you ore 17 or older, 
guarantee yourself $1200 
this summer. You'll also 
receive a 100% college 
tuition scholarship and 
monthly part time pay. 
Call for details. 

1 -(800)252-2972 

19312 

FIND A JOB, or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 



'RETIREES 
'HOUSEWIVES 
'COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Bored at home or need 
extra money? We have 
openings in our labor 
reserve pool for per- 
sons available for 
special projects. Hours 
and days -are flexible. 
Starling salary $3.75- 
$4.00 per hour. 
Apply in Person: 
FORMS 
CORPORATION 
OF AMERICA 
2800 N. Route 12 
Spring Grove, IL. 

Tquat opportunity mmptayrm/t 



IGenerol Olfice 



Start the New Year 

"RIQHT" 

TOP PAY+$150 BONUS 



'i 



We have temporary openings for experienced: 

•SECRETARIES 'WORD PROCESSORS 
'TYPISTS * SWITCHBOARD OPRS. 

•CRT 'ACCOUNTING CLERKS 

Work dose to home, the days or weeks you want. 
Ask about our 3 NEW BONUS PROGRAMS 



WHEELING 
(312) 459-1320 



GURNEE 
(312) 662-4646 



RIGHT TEMPORARIES 




TYPISTS NEEDED for 

home work. Good income 
possible. Please write Mrs. 
Young. P.O. Box 93L, Zlon, 
IL 60099. 

— 19-6-46 

FIND A JOB, or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 
(312)223-8161 



WOMEN/MEN Earn extra 
money. Sell Avon, near 
home/work. . 

(312)566-0990 
-— 19-TF-7— 



education 

REHABILITATION TEACHER 

OR TUCHER OF THE BLIID 

Pari time to work with deaf, 
blind odulli. Center lor 
Doof-BIind Periom. Inc. 0680 
S. Klnnlcklnnk Ave., 

Milwaukee. 

(414) 461-7477 



ill TN TOMmiLl IIOBUTEI? 

EteTttttn job* a i recent 'itdvile 
jr.d need IrmpwKy « irjuiii htilth 
murine* mwjjj ' 

CiflStittFaralfnt 

••fcStu'tl it (J 12) 351-2111 
About yiort-twm or if Jul si hnpiiil- 
unficil inurince. 



Part-Time 
BARTENDER 

Apply In Person 

Andrea's Steak House 

% mile North of « " . 1 73 oo U.S. 13) 
Richmond. Illinois 

(613) 676-2671 



PART TIME 
EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR 

Call 
Ask For Jean 

KNOLLWOOD COURTS 

(312) 387-0303 



Port-Time 

BARTENDER 

And 

COCKTAIL WAITRESS 

Applf In Pinal 

MeMillians Restaurant 

(Acton tram ls**W>tMolll 
Woukegon 



EXCELLENT 
INCOME 

For port-time home 
oiiembly work. For Informa- 
tion call: 

(304)641.8003 

Ext. 8333 



RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST 
Part-Time 

Our Ubertyville office) li In 
need of a mature people 
oriented individuol to greet 
cutlomert and handle In 
coming calls. Good typing 
ikllli are required to provide 
luppon for vorloui depart- 
ment!. Occaiional heavy 
work load. Morning or after- 
noon hours, plus alternate 
Saturdays. 

It Interested please colt per- 
sonnel department 
(312) 341-3500 



bttrfrnfa FW mi Strap 
id Lui Itweutiu 



1U H. Mllwoufcee Ave. 
Ubertyville. Illinois 60048 

Cqual Opportunity Employer 

rt'» Or, luri'rdvnokmg hcilltf 




SALES CLERK 

Port-Time 
9:00 a.m. to 5: 30 p.m. 

•Good With People 
'Neat Appearance 
'Dependability A Musi 

Apply In Person 

NO CALLS, PLEASE 

Fok Lake Office Sepply 

7 N. Nippertlnk 
Fox Lake, II, 



ISISIOUfaRtlOblOHolvIo] 



dhqed nnan quo 



IXlNlVldldT 



BfinninQ uafnn 




0HHDB EQBH 

□DEB 0UOHDH 



3 iiis iNj »ii mm ijom i 



GREETING HOSTESSES 
WELCOME NEWCOMERS 

to, 

Gurnee/Wildwood 

Part-Time Flexible Hours 

Must Have A Car No Selling 

ROYAL WELCOME 

(312) 566-0520 



VAN DRIVER 

Applications are being taken for a driver to 
deliver newspapers to Post Offices and 
stores on Wednesdays only. Must be 
reliable and have references. Will work 
from 9 a.m. until finished. Ideal part-time 
job for night worker. 

Contact BUI Schroeder Jr. 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney-Grays lake, II 

(312)223-8161 



PRODUCT DEMONSTRATORS/ 
PERFORMANCE SHOPPERS 

*Work Weekdays And/Or Weekends 
*Work Only 2-5 Hours Per Day 
'Demonstrate Food Samples, Passout Coupons 
'Evaluate Products, Etc. 

II you are pleasant, outgoing and reliable these 
maybe the jobs for you. No experience required. 

|ZII\| The 

I^lI hi 1 Temporary 
IerviCES Help Company" 

Ubertyville (312) 367-1 144 

Wheeling ....,..(312)459-6009 

Register now and pickup a complimentary Issue of 
"Work Style Magazine." 

Not an agency never a fee. 



NEEDED immediately* 
welders, carpenters, olec- 
Irtcians, plumbers, 
management, mechanics, 
machinists, drivers, 
operators. Entry 

level/degreed up to 
$32.60/hour. Trans- 
continental Job Search. 
Fee. 

(303)452-2258* 

. -20-3-14- 

TEXAS OIL Company 
needs mature person 'for 
short trips surrounding 
Lake County. Contact 
customers. We train. Write 
H.F. Dickerson, Pros., 
Southwestern Petroleum, 
Box. 961005. Fort Worth, 
Tx.76161. 

— 20-3-44- 

WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for on employer or an em- 
ployee, Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success, 
(312)223-8161 



WILL TRAIN! 

ft* l£M> OttUrCftS. ft* utma 
muax? Us ttsVt<< U-A«i lor tp6u*. 
Mtt Ajtiic ptofit »w \M to Wl on [<m 
phew. Peiru-ti-L M Ixr* Coed wriii-j 
nwHwi Hwtr .sit) ptti bc*wi U 00 
pa l«r, lucrum sftv JO I W irn ■» 
Cheat i«*i«ct btwtitL CjO Cmm tor 



(312) 3+6-9&01 



CUSTODIIL DUTIES 

Fast growing com- 
pany needs mature 
person to handle 
custodial duties In our 
new facility in Lake 
Forest. Full-time, 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon- 
day through Friday. 

CALL: 

(31 2) 498-3530 

ASK FOR RICH 



Immediate 
Positions 

'OFFICE HELP 
'SALESPEOPLE 

Full Time 

And 
Part-Time 

Please Coll 

(312) 680-8440 



BOOKKEEPER/ 
CRT OPERATOR 

We arm looking for o full time 
Bookkeeper wllh CRT ex- 
perience of at least 3 yean. 
Additional duties would be 
phone, typing, shorthand 
would be helpful and hor- 
ticultural experience would 
be a big plus. 

SCHRODER'S HURSEHT 

Grayilake 

(312) 546-9444 



JANITORIAL 

Full Time 
Part-Time 

Positions Available 
For Cleaning Offices 

For Further Information 

(312) 666-3563 

C-936 



SECRETARY 

District Sales 

If you ore on experienced 
secretary, foody for astep 
up, Ihlt position maybe for 
you. We nave an Immediate 
need for o sales oriented 
secretary to work in our 
NORTHBSOOK district office 
to handle the sales Inquiry 
and lead follow up system os 
well os service Inquiry and 
general office duties. Good 
•yP' n B. organization and 
communication skills are re- 
quired. An associate degree 
of secretarial school diploma 
Is preferred as Is word pro- 
cessor/PC experience, 
Strong opportunity lor ad- 
vancement. Full benefits, 
commensurate pay. No 
telephone Inquiries. Send 
resume to; 

The Cheney Company 
c/o Patrick Edwards 

1017 Elsie Ave. 
Gumoe, Illinois 60031 



20 HELPWAMTED 
FULLTIME 



FULL/PART time. $180 per 
roll taking photographs. 
Experience unnecessary. 
Camera and film supplied 
free. 

(312)769-9000 

ext.3020 

including evenings 

20-4-5 

SECURITY DUTY. Marine 
Corps duty at U.S. Navy 
bases around the world. 
High school diploma 
required. Some college a 
plus. Valuable training, 
promotion. 

1 -(800)223-8762 
20-3-10 



20 HELP WMTEB 
^. fULLTIIIE 

GOVERNMENT JOB lists 
local, state and federal, 
guarantee 'Illinois 
residence. Immediate 
openings, $400 ,'to $1400 
weekly. 

(312)769-1200 

ext.9020 

Including evenings , 

20-3-4— . 

A LAKELAND News- 
paper's Classified ad can 
help you turn unwanted 
items Into cash. To sell 
almost anything, just call 
our office nearest you. 
(312)223-8161 



DRIVERS 

100.000 mite solo operation. 
Chkogo base, home wfcndi. 
Must have 3 yn.'or 250,000 ml. 
of semi O.T.R. experience with 
pood driving record, A Chicago 
based company, tote modal 
equipment. Benefits ovoltoble. 

1.(800)328-2347 



ASSEMBLY WORK 

Excellent woges in spare 
time. Electronics, crafts, 
no experience. Others. 
Info Call (504) 641-0091 
Ext. 4128. Open 7 days. 
Call Now I 



WALLCOVERING 
DEPARTMENT 

Clerical duties which Include 
processing of orders of. 
wallcoverings ond window 
treatments as well - os 
customer service. Must have 
flexible schedule Iticfudlng 
weekends. Good opportune 
ly tor righr person. 

MUIBEUII Plin CEITEi 
(312) 566-9160 

Aik For Bob or Dick 

To Arrange Personal 

Interview 



Full Time 

OFFSET 

PRESSMAN 

(Sheet Fed) 

3 years experience 
minimum. Benefits. 
Good Working Condi- 
tions. Single And 
Multicolor Work. 
Phone: 

(414) 654-8042 
For Interview 



SALESPERSON 



Full Time 

Paint Department 



Ex- 



perience helpful but not 
necessary, will ' train. 
Good opportunity lor 
right person. 

For personal Mervimw. 
Call: 

(312)566-9160 

Ask For Bob or Dick 



TEACHERS, 
AIDES, SUBS. 

For pre-school in 
Round Lake, Full 
and part-time, ex- 
cellent benefits. 

Call: 

(312) 546-3383 



RESIDENT MANAGER COUPLE 
OR TEAM WANTED FOR: 

- "St 

Full time position In Antloch. Live on site, 90 unit com- 
plex. Strong maintenance and clerical skills. Must be able 
to communicate wllh public. Experience preferred, but 
will train the right people. Send resume Including salary 
requirements to: 

MADSEN CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 396 
Rochelle, IL. 61068 

Equal Opportunity Cmploytr M/F 



2ND SHIFT 
WORKING FOREMAN 

For Specialty Plastic Bag Company 

Must hove proctkal knowledge of electrlcol and mechanical 
tyttemt with a minimum of 2 years tupervliory experience, 
working wllh people and understanding their noeds. We are a 

growing company In the plasties field with good fringe 
enefitt, jolary based on qualif Icollom. 



]m 



Send Resume 



0H^- products, inc. 

201 Pork Ave. Loke Villa, II 60046 

An f quo/ Opportunity tmpioyr * 



NOTICE OF EUMINITIOR 

FOR THE POSITION OF POLICE PATROL OFFICER 

IN THE VILLAGE OF WAUG0NDI f ILLINOIS 

Applications and additional Information are available 
at the Wauconda Police Department, 100 Main Street, 
Wauconda. 

Applicants must be between 21 and 34 years of age. 

Applications must be returned to the POLICE DEPART* 
MENT ONLY by 4:30 P.M. on Saturday, January 31 , 
1987. 

Orientation will be held on Saturday, February 7, 
1987, at 9:00 A.M. In the Board Room of the Village 
Hall, 101 North Main Street, Wauconda. 

Physical Agility Test will be held at 9:00 A.M. and the 
Written Test will bo held at 1:00 P.M. both on Satur- 
day, February 14, 1987, at the Wauconda High School, 
555 N, Main St., Wauconda. 



Oral Tests wl 
1987. 



commence no sooner than March 7, 



Vision requirements 20/50 each eye corrected to 
20/20. 

Board of Fire and Police Commissioners 
Village of Wauconda 

(An Equal Opportunity imptoyr. Malr/F»mal») 

Raymond R. Cox, Chairman. 



18A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January 15, 1957 






I 








WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for on employer or on em- 
ployee, Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success. 



20 HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME 



COMMERCIAL 
UNDERWRITER 

Insurance Agency In 
Fox Lake Is looking for 
an experienced In- 
surance person: ., Ex- 
cellent working .condi- 
tions 8 benefits. Call 
for appointment. 

anti iisniKE iGEMi, ik. 

(312)587-2155 



Full Time 
Part-Time 

SALESPERSONS 

Must Be Strong 

Duties Include: 

•Heavy Lifting 

'Register Work 

Should be people oriented 
wtlh ploaianl manner. 

Apply In Perton 

Like Cook Farm Supply 

400C«nltrSt. 

- Gtoytloke. III. 



CLERKS 

CLERK 

TYPISTS 



NEED 45 PEOPLE) 
TOP PAY PLUS BONUS 

Wt nttd CfMtil Clnlj. VM Cfcib. 
Fijuie Class, lip.tfi. md taountim 
Clttts 

WHEELIK (312) 459-1320 
GUMEE (312) 6624648 



RIGHT 
TEMPORARIES 



Cltrlcal 

ACCOUNTS 

RECEIVABLE 

CLERK 

Immediate opening exists 
for an A/R Clerk. Qualified 
candidate must hove 
previous office experience 
involving 1-3 years in- 
dustrial credit experience. 
Some accurate light typing 
Involved. 

We offer excellent com- 
pensation and full 'com- 
pany benefits. Pleaio 
apply: 

EMPLOYEE RELATIONS 

DEPARTMENT 
STREETER RICHARDSON 

ISS Wkkt 

Grayitat.*, U 60030 

(NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) 

[qua! Opportunity Employer 
M/F/H/V 



PARA-MORTGAGE 
PERSONNEL 

(Entry Level) 

Our market area lending 
department Is in im- 
mediate need of 
qualified Individuals to 
perform functions 
related to receptionist, 
processing, closing and 
shipping. These support 
positions require ac- 
curacy, thoroughness, 
and a cooperative at- 
titude. Related home 
mortgage experience 
preferred. 

We offer a competitive 
salary, pleasant working 
conditions, excellent 
benefits and opportunity 
for growth. Interested In- 
dividuals call personnel 
(312) 362-3500. 



' Lei Lui iuKiitiee 



354 N. Milwaukee Ave, 
Liborlyvillo, Illinois 6004B 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

WtArwAUmlhdSnieklnafedtllr 



i 



HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME 



Aviation 

A&P LICENSED 
MECHANICS 

Metro SA 226. SA 227. Giirttt IPE 
331 up. pftl. Immedute openings 
in Pjlm Sprinci end other S. Cihlw- 
nU locations. Stirling ««e to 
II 1 .SO/houi plus dependini en shift 
end eiperience. Send inurrw to 
Keith Mjliur, Oiiector, MiinSemnce. 
SKYWEST AIRLINES, 50 Cut 100 
South, Suite 202, St. Ceotje. UT, 
84 7/0. tquil opportunity employer 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

Wisconsin license, '< im- 
mediate FT opening. 
Smaller So. Wise, com- 
munity. For more Info 
colt J.D.W. (608)834-9466 
or A.H.W. (608) 882- 
4410. 



HAIRSTYLIST 

need for busy, friendly, 
progressive salon. Ask 
for Diane at 

(312)546-1810 



PRESSMEN / PLATEM AKERS 

Busy south Lake County offset job shop has 
openings for part-time sheet fed 
pressmen/platemokers. Both day and night 
hours available. Must be able to work on your 
own. All replies confidential. Write about your 
experience and avaitablity to: 

Box 143 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grays lake, II. 60030 



THE LAKE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE MERIT COMMISSION 
is now accepting applications to form a cerlifiod eligibility 
list from which future vacancies in the Sheriff's Office will 
be fllted. This list will be valid for two (2) years. 

CERTIFIED DEPUTY SHERIFF 
QUALIFICATIONS 

Clllren of the Untied Stales 

Illinois resident lor 1 y«ar 

Aget 2t to 35 

High school graduate (or III. G.E.D.) 

Valid Illinois Driver's License 

Musi successfully complete: 

1. Physical aptitude test 

2. Written ontrance examination 

3. Background Investigation 

4. Polygraph * psychological exam 

5 ° roUn,mntim " APPLY IN PERSON 
9:30 to 1 1:30 a.m. 

or 
12:30 to 4:00 p.m. 

MERIT COMMISSION 

County Bldg., 4th Floor 
18 No. County St. ' 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
(312)/360-663B) 

Applications will be accepted until Friday, Feb. 20, 1987 
Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

Outstanding Opportunity Awaits You for Our 
Corporate offices located in the Lincolnshire 
Area! 

We ore o.leoder In the outomollve Industry where you will receive on 
• i c • I lent compeniol Ion (or your obi I It les and ex perllse. 

t h» succetslul candidate must type 65-70 wpm. , be well organised, hove 
a pleasant personality ond handle various olfice duties. Word practis- 
ing helpful. 

Qualllied candidate will receive an outstanding company benelit pro- 
gram including 3 weeks potd vocation, 13 paid holidays, heotlh/lite In- 
surance, denial and prescription plan plus more. 

Write or Call For Appointment Personnel Dept. 

(312)634-5142 

VOLKSWAGEN 
OF AMERICA 

420 Barclay 61 vd . Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

an affirmative action equal opportunity employer 



TRUCK DRIVERS 

Steady Work/Secure Future 
First Class Equipment 

Progressive Nationwide Company has openings for 
trained interstate drivers at its now local facility. Ap- 
plicants must be 25 years of age or older, high school 
graduates, have proven safety records which include 
no preventable accidents or serious traffic violations 
within the last 3 years, meet all DOT requirements 
and have o minimum of 5 years recent tractor-trailer 
experience. These are full time positions with good 
wages and a full range of fringe benefits. 

Applications will be accepted and Interviews con- 
ducted Thurs. Jan. 15, 1987 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ond 2 

p.m. to 5 p.m. at: 

Howard Johnsons 

1716 W. Layton Ave., Milwaukee, Wl 
No Phone Calls Please 

Those Interested Qualified Applicants Who Can Not 
Be Available On January 15th Are Encouraged To Sub- 
mit A Resume And Letter Outlining Work History, 
Education, Personal Data and Wage History to: Per- 
sonnel Dept., One Energy Center Suite 330, Naper- 
ville, IL. 60540 

on mqual opportunity employer m/l 



HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME 



I 



20 HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME ' 



i 



Full ond Part-Time 

SALESPEOPLE 

Awlitil* la . net kendi and mninfi 

Celt <x Set Mi<Mf«. 

NATURALIZE*? SHOES 

513 Hawthorn Center 

Vernon Hllli, II. 

(312) 367-1121 



RN's 

AruMS HoxkIjI. uwipttitin uijrj I 
btadifi. tuM. clinutt, KBcart t not*- 
tend oijptr'i DiiKta si Pcnaiitd, 
MNGIUN. ICGIONM. HIDrOU. CEK1U. 
3169 StatlM Itll U , Kispnsit, « 1*401. 

(602)757-2101 oxt. 133 

Equal apply, employer 



Can Toe Type 50 w.p.m.T 
Do You Have Keypunch Ex- 
perience, (or be willing to 
iearn)T 

If so. we need you I We 
hove positions opened In 
our Data Entry 
Department. 

Monday through Friday 
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Apply In Person 

H.OIsen & Co. 

342 N. Fourth SI. 

Llbertyvllle, II. 

Ask For Marianne or Denlie 



DRIVERS OTR 

K.A.T. has increased their piy 
scale. Ate you looking for a job 
with a company that wauls to work 
with you? KM. has (op pay, 
health insurance, excellent equip- 
ment to dtive, lay-over pay, eel you 
home mosl weekends. Suiting pay 
20 cent/mile with bonus. More 
money with experience. II you are 
25 years or older have 2 years OTR 
experience, no OWl's, a good safe- 
ty recoid and a clean appearance 
call Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-S p.m., Sal. S 
a.m.-Noon lo KAT Inc., Chesterton, 
IN. 

(219)926-3413 



BUS DRIVERS 

We Will Train 

Good Pay 

Fill Out Application At: 

ROUND LAKE AREA SCHOOLS 
SERVICE CENTER 



811 Sunset 



Round Lake, IL. 



MAINTENANCE 
SUPERINTENDENT 

New 81 unit apartment complex currently under construc- 
tion and expected to open in mid-February has opening 
for maintenance superintendent. Seeking sell motivated 
applicant with expertise In oil phases of maintenance, 
janitorial and ground work. Must have own tools ond the 
obility to work independently under the diroction of a 
resident manager. 

Our standards are very high and applicant must be willing 
to meet and exceed those slandards to be successful with 
our company. 

Salary $1500 a month plus heolth Insurance, o small 1 
bedroom cottage on site and paid utilities. 

Please mail resume or work history to: 

The Woodlands 

3500 Green Bay Rd. 
North Chicago, Illinois 60064 



Ytardeer 

Now Taking Applications 
For Daytime Employment. 

Must Be Hard Working And Dedicated 

Flexile Hours and Wages 
Aie Available 

Apply In Person lit 

Hardeei 

In Antioch Or Phone 

(312)3954)474 

Between 8:00 A.M. & 10:00 A.M. 
Or 2:00 P.M. & 4:00 P.M. 

V- 

(Corner of Rt 83 &Rt 173) 



20 HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

S16,04O-S59,230/yr. 

Now Hiring. 

Call 809-687-6000 
Ext. R-5852 

for current federal Hit. 




20 HELP WANTED 
FULLTIME 



TYPIST 

$500 weekly possible. For 
Information tend self ad- 
dressed envelope to: 

2032 GILEAD-B 
ZION, ILL 60099 



NEGHUIGU ASSEMBLY 

We ore looking for a 
person for Mechanical 
assembly of packaging 
equipment. Modern 
new facility In Lake 
Forest. 

Full-Time days Monday 
through Friday. 

CALL: 

(312) 498-3530 

ASK FOR HIKE SINK 



PUNCH PRESS 
OPERATORS 

Dye-set person*/ and or 
set-up and run operators. 

Full Time and Part-Time 
Presses lo ISO Ion*, pro- 
gressive dye experience 
preferred. 

Coll For Interview Appointment: 

Domeny Tool And Stamping 

354 Hollow Hill Or. 
Woucondo, IL. 

(312)526-5700 



SECURITY 
GUARDS 



Full Time 
Part-Time 

Positions Available 
For Further Information 

(312) 666-3541 

C937 



QUALA 
CARE 

Complete Home 

Maintenance Service: 

Needs Maids, To Clean Up. 
Advancements based on 
your own accomplishments. 
Full and Part-Time positions 
available. Trolnlng provided 
lor all qualified applicants. 

For Further Information: 

(312) 223-9122 



Full and Part-Time 

EMPLOYMENT 

Flexible Hours Weekdays Or Weekends 
Horse Experience Helpful, But Not Required. 



sbertyvltle 




Apply In Person 
Monday-Friday j 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



306 Peterson Rd. (Hwy. 137) 
Llbenyvllle. III. 



GROUND FLOOR SALES 
OPPORTUNITY 

The Catholic Knights Insurance Society, one of the na- 
tion's leading fraternal organizations, has expanded to Il- 
linois. Catholic men and women with good communica- 
tion skills are encouraged to apply for this exciting sales 
position. Fringe benefits and financing up to 530.000. 

PHONE: 

MR. BRAUN 

FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEW AT 

(312)623-6020 



LPN'S AND CNA'S 

3 p.m. to 11 p.m. 
11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 

Immediate openings for Private Duty and 
Staff Relief. 

For experienced Nurses and Nurses Aides 
in Lake County. Excellent wages and fringe 
benefits. 

t 

Call For An Appointment: 

MANPOWER® HEALTH CARE 

(312) 949-WELL 
(312)949-9355 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



2 1 BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 



LONG DISTANCE 

trucking. General freight. 
northAmerlcan Com-, 
merclal Transporl needs 
owner/operators for 
nationwide hauling. If you 
need training, we will train 
you. You will operate your 
own tractor. If you don't 
have one, northAmerlcan 
offers a purchase program 
that can put you in a trac- 
tor for $2500 down, if you 
are 21 or over and think 
you may qualify, call for a 
complete information 
package. Call any week- 
day: Toll free 1 -(800)348- 
2192, ask for Department 
137. 

21-3-11 




TYPIST 

tSM WttMf II lees 

Uei I (»«»♦«*, Sett UertttW 

Est ilsit 

Te 

I.I. 

303 Sprint Strut 
Intlttidt, llliioli 60041 



With Lakeland 



Thursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 9A 



87 



i 




36 

GENERAL SERVICES 



LOCAL 0« OVItUAf 

JOB RESUME $9 

and up. Wt do It oil. E*P«rt 
writing, typing and printing. 
F i »• inlarvlaw. 

MER1CURESDNE 'SERVICE 
(312)662-1551 



"-i' 



Girptntrjilectrieal 

Plumbing 

Siding-Roofing 

Interior ft Uiritr Palatini 

Wrecking I Hauling 

Call For 

FREE ESTIMATE 
(312)587-5151 

Fully Insured 



4 3 BUSIIESSSUmiESHD 

eqvipkit 



TYPESETTER AM Varityper- 
3510 comp/5et, typefaces, 
processor, waxer, art 
table. 

(312)872-3288 
43-3-68 




MOUNTAIN OAK fire- 
wood. All amounts 
available. 

(312)587-6654 

or 

(312)356-8930 

call anytime 

50-3-73 




PET PORTRAITS from you. 
photo. S35. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

(312)546-0564 

51-3-35 — : — 

DOBERMAN Pinscher. 
female, 4 months old. 
Good health. 

(312)433-8437 

51 -3-50 

AKC GOLDEN Retriever 
pups, 8 weeks old, (5) 
males left, $225. 

(312)223-7732 
after 5 p.m. 

51- 3-60 

3 AKC Siberian Huskies, 7 

weeks old, 2 males, 1 

female, $200 each. 

(312)546-8709 

after 6 p.m. 

51-3-61 

AKC GERMAN Shepherd 
puppy, 6V4 months old, 
beautiful looking dog. $350 
or best offer, 

(312)5B7-4719 

51-3-62 

COCKER PUPS, AKC, buffs 
and tans, $200 to $300. 
(312)395-6420 

or 
(312)395-0888 
-51-3.63 





HALF PRICE! 

Flashing arrow ilgnt $2991 
Lighted, non-arrow $2791 
UnligSlad $2491 Free (at- 
tars) Soo locally. Call to- 
day! Factory: 

(600)423-0163 
anytime 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PHOTOS FOR all oc- 
casions. Weddings, an- 
niversaries, parlies, por- 
traits. Professional photos 
at affordable prices. 
(312)356-2230 
Bruce C. Cairy 

58-26-8 

1000 SUNBEDS. Sunal- 
Wolff. Save 50%, Call for 
free color catalogue and 
wholesale pricing. Ex- 
cellent money maker or 
gift. M/C or VISA ac- 
cepted. 

1.(800)228-6292 

58-3-13 

SKIS, BOOTS, poles, ski 
pants, humidifier, 
refrigerator, freeier, 
child's car seat. 

(312)587-1950 

58-3-22 r ■ 

SEARS KENMORE port- 
able dryer. Fair condition. 
$15. 

(312)433-8437 

58-3-51 

WASHER AND dryer. $200 
or best offer. 

(312)395-0969 

58-3-72 

CAST IRON wood stove, 

with brick base and Inside 

pipe, $125 or best offer. 

(312)740-0699 

after 4 p.m. 

58-3-95 

ONE Vh FT. Western 
plow, complete, good con* 
dition. $600. 

(312)546-7833 

58-3-106 

ONE 6% FT. Western 
snowplow, complete for 
Jeep, Bronco or small 4 
wheel drive. $400, firm. 
(312)546-7833 

58-3-107 

20 IN. TV, stereo recep- 
tion, Emerson remote con- 
trol, clock, digital sleep 
timer, 1 year old, rarely 
used. New, $400, Selling 
now only $250, 

(312)395-8044 

58-3-6 

BOYS' FIRST rifle, Stevens 
14'/, Little Scout 22 long, 
single, patent 1907. Morlin 
Firearms old-time slide ac- 
tion, Model 38, 22 short, 22 
long, long rifle, patent 
1914. 12 gauge double 
barrel shotgun, coach gun. 
Must have Illinois firearm 
owner's identification 
"card. Collection of 60 Jim 
Beam bottles. 

(312)639-3680 
Robert Riller 

58-3-116 

FOR SALE: TV tower, an- 
tique Singer sewing 
machine, working con- 
dition, full size sofa, round 
wall mirror, small end 
table.. 

(312)223-4698 
58-3-117 



COUNCIL CLOSET 
•JANUARY SPECIAL* 
7, OFF ALL INVENTORY 
Donilions also accepted to ra- 
tional Council ol Jewisti Women, 

41 HO I H WOOD AVI., 
KIOHWOOO, ILL. 

(312) * 3 3-63 CO 



BRITTANY SPANIEL, 18 
month old male, excellent 
with children, $40. 
(312)546-7701 

51-3-64 

AKC POMERANIAN 8 
week old male puppy, 
possible show. Will mature 
to4'/i to 5 pounds. 
(312)587-9802 

51-3-96 




FULL LENGTH European 
Nutria Fur Coat, $1800 or 
best! 

(312)623-5340 

after 5 p.m. 

59-3-110 




VICTORIAN ART building 

salvage, antique fireplace 

mantel, oak molding, back 

bar, stained glass. 

(312)367-5950 

after 3 p.m. 

53-4-59 




COUNTRY STYLE couch 
and recllner with can- 
nonball wood trim, eorth 
tone material In good con- 
dition, $200. 

(312)689-8702 

61-3-71— 

FORMAL OAK dining 
room set, Victorian style, 2 
captains chairs, 6 hl-bock 
regular chairs, 2 leaves, 
only 1 Vt years old, ex- 
cellent condition, paid 
$3500 new, best offer. 

(312)587-4175 
61-3-99 

6? COMPUTERS AND 
VIDEO GAMES 

IBM PC JR. computer: 
128K, color monitor, Epson 
RX-80FT Printer, word 
processing (business and 
educational software in- 
cluded), brand new con- 
dition, $850 or best offer. 
(312)497-3525 
62-3-1 14 



64 



SPORTS EQUIPMENT 



BRAND NEW Golden Ram 
Per*. Woods, 1-3-4, Ram 
Laser graphite head wood 
1-3-5. $125 each. 

(312)680-8733 
64.3 36 




SLOT MACHINES or parts. 
Also old Wurlltzer juke 
boxes and nickelodeons. 
Any condition. Paying 
cash. 

(312)985-2742 

65 27-9 

LOSERS WANTED: Lose up 
to 29 pounds, inches, cell- 
u-llte this month. Doctor 
recommended on TV. I've 
lost over 50 pounds 
myself 1 1 1 

(612)641-0338 

65-3-15 

CORVETTES WANTED. 
Any year or condition. 
Also antique, special in- 
terest cars and very low 
mileage cars. 

(414)245-9395 
65-3-58 



1 



66 



AUCTIONS 



AUCTION 

10 a.m. to 10:43 a.m. 
Monday through Saturaay 

INN THAT ILL OF TIE 
UMGE SALES Art our, 
coma and t«a as. 

SALVATION ARMY 

506 S. Shortdan Road 
WAUKEGAN, ILL. 

(312) 662-7730 




LOVE SEAT and sola, 
living room sel. Good con- 
dition. $375. 

(312)623-9530 
afler4 p.m. 

61 -3-23 

3 PIECE early American 
living room set, like new, 
couch, lovo seat and chair, 
beige floral, $450. 
(312)639-3680 

61-3-115 

DINING ROOM set. Glass 
lop, Vt inch thick. 40x72 
with 6 raltan and chrome 
chairs. Plus glass top 
serving table. Perfect con- 
dition, $300. 

(312)587-2248 

61-3-119— 

FIND A JOB, or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 



im* 



YOU ARE Invited to Bridal 
Expo '87, Sunday, January 
18, Gurnee Holiday Inn. 
Complete wedding show. 
Free admission. Call (312) 
949.4454 . for reserved 
seats. Co-sponsored by 
Lakeland Newspapers and 
Debbie's Floral. 
.,. 63-3-9 




COMPUTER DATING 

Service of Lake County.' 
Free brochure. 

(312)680-2528 

62-5-17 

MAKE A date for Bridal 
Expo '87, Sunday, January 
18, Gurnee Holiday Inn.. 
Wedding finery and en- 
tertainment galore. Call 
(312) 949-4454 for reserved 
seating. Admission free. 

VISA/MASTERCARD-Get 

your card today I Also new 
credit cord, no one 
refused I 

1 -(518)459-3546 

ext. C3645 

24 hours 

62-54 




LOST BRIEFCASE with cor- 
porate records, Grayslako. 
Reward. No questions. 
(312)223-2510 
69-3-123 




FOUND SMALL tortoise 

female cat, January 7 on 

Fairfield Road, Wauconda. 

(312)381-6398 

70-3-16 



I 



71 



GIVEAWAY 



FOUR ADORABLE kittens 
to loving home. 6 weeks 
old. 2 black, 1 gray, 1 
beige. 

(312)546-4115 
after 4 p.m. 

71-3-47 

MARKETPLACE for smart 
shoppers, that's Lakeland 
Classified. 

(312)223-8161 



NEW 4H Club in Woucon- 
do/lsland Lake area. 
Meeting, January 20th, 
6:30 p.m. 

(312)639-7939 

67-3-18 

THOUSANDS OF mall or- 
der buyer's lists are 
available for immediate 
use. Send stamped, self 
addressed envelope to 
Stueve, 33 Tremont, Fox 
Lake, II. 60020. 

67-3-55 

WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for an employer or an em. 
ployee, Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success. 



FREE 

FREE 
FREE 

Something to give away? 
You can run youi. ad 
FREE in Lakeland 
Classified. Just give us a 
call. 

(312) 223-8161 
(312) 395-8700 
(312) 587-8400 
(312) 6894600 





1977 APACHE, all 

fiberglass pop-up camper, 
sleeps 6, $1500. 

(312)356-1865 

evenings 

before 9 p.m. 

-77-3-109 




1983 YAMAHA Trl-Molo 

200, great shape, priced to 

sell $600 or best offer. 

(312)949-0868 

79-389 




so TRUCKS AND 
TRAILERS 



195$ CHEVY '/» ton pickup, 
runs, but no transmission, 
$1000 or best offer. 
(312)395-8419 

: — 80-3-77 

1983 IVECO dtesel truck, 
16,000 lbs. G.V.W., 16 ft. 
aluminum box, 5 speed, 16 
mpg, air, $12,500. 

(312)223-3266 
evenings 
fi Q 3 *? B 
1979 FORD F250 pickup 
truck with 4 wheel drive. 
62,000 miles. with 
snowplow, excellent con- 
dition. $5500 or best oiler. 
(312)949-6629 
80-3-104 




PRACTICALLY new set of 
14 inch tires and rims for 
$350. 

(312)244-6901 

82-3-43 

302 FORD engine, good 
condition: 350 Chevy 
engine, good condition, 
used transmissions, 
guaranteed. 

(312)623-9482 

81-464 

FORD 6 cylinder truck 
engine with overdrive 
transmission, 48,000 miles, 
$450. 

(312)587-8030 
after 6 p.m. 

82-3-76 

1980 CIS Joep, Stripping 
out for parts. 

(312)587-6664 

82-381 

04 CATERPILLAR tractor, 
for parts. 

(312)623-1664 
82-3-82 



REBUILT transmissions. 
Carry out $175 for 
automatic trans- 

missions only, except front 
wheel drive ond torque 
converters. All front wheel 
drive and 4 wheel drive 
vehicles, cars and trucks 
cut rate prices, installed or 
carry out, "Open 9 to 9 
seven days a week. Ex- 
cellent towing rates out of 
town. 

(312)623-9482 
81-4-65 




CASH LOAN needed from 
private individual for ap- 

Kroximately 5 years to buy" 
ouse. Will pay interest 
and secure adequately. 
Husband and wifo have 
good credit and good full 
time lobs. 

(312)395-9270 
73-3 -52 



good running 
good body. 



1975 MGB, 

condition, 

$2000. 

312)438-8046 

312)526-6966 

84-3-66 



1982 VOLKSWAGEN 

Scirocco, excellent car, 
great shape, $4500. 
(312)249-3465 

84-3-1 1 1 

1978 DATSUN 2B0Z, Many 
new parts, $3500 or best 



offer. 



■ aanmiiiUlMl 



* T , 1 ■ 1 i I . i r I FT" 



(312)662-0389 

after 5 p.m. 

-84-3-24- 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD 
Write your ad on apiece of 
paper. The rote Is 30 cents 
per word. Minimum size is 
20 words or $6.00 plus a 
$2.00 box charge. Enclose 
your check or money order 
prior to publication. No 
names or phone numbers 
will be published. Coded 
box numbers will be 
assigned. Replies will be 
mailed weekly to 
boxholders. The publisher 
reserves the right to reject 
ony ad and ads will be 
positioned a I the 



discretion of the publisher. 

TO ANSWER 
one or more Malch Mates 
Personals, mark the bot- 
tom loft-hand corner of 
each envelope with the 
coded box number listed in 
each ad. Each reply should 
be sent In a separate en- 
velope but all envelopes 
can be sent in one large 
envelope lo: Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 
268, Grayslako, IL 60030. 
Replies will be forwarded 
weekly for a period of two 
months. 



1978 VOLKSWAGEN Golf. 
Handyman's special, Weeds 
work," asking $750. 
(312)356-3023 

84-4-34 

1981 FIAT Strada, 5 speed, 
stereo system, under 
51.000 miles $900 or best 
offer. 

(312)746-5747 

after 4 p.m. 

-84-3-38- 



20A Lakeland Newspapers 



1980 DATSUN 200 SX, hat- 
chback, automatic, 
AM/FM, power steering 
and brakes, air, sunroof. 
Excellent condition. Must 
sell, $1900. 

(312)566-7122 
84-3-25 

1982 TOYOTA, Collca GTS, 
5 speed, air, cruise, tilt, 
excellent condition. Must 
sell. $5500 or best. 

(312)662-1791 
84-332 

1983 VOLKSWAGEN 
Vanagon GL, excollent 
shape, $6400 or best offer, 

(312)587-7444 
-84-3-33 - 



1980 CHEVETTE, 4 speed, 
low mileage, original 
owner, $2500. 

(312)367-1428 
after 6 p.m. 

85-3-75 

1978 PONTIAC Grand 
LeMans, loaded, $2500 or 
best offer. 

(312)356-9149 

85-3-84 

1980 GRAND Prix, V6, 
62,000 miles, power 
steering, power brakes, 
air conditioning, dark 
green with tan interior, 1 
owner, very clean, Firm at 
$2500. 

(312)356-7353 
85-3-85 




1911 

XLT, 
$5500. 



FORD 

new 



Bronco 4x4 
302 engine, 



(312)634-3059 
-85-3-88 



1984 COUGAR LS, V8, low 
miles, loaded with factory 
options, transferable 
warranty. $8900 or best of- 
fer. 

(312)362-8473 

85-3-65 

1980 PLYMOUTH Horizon. 
Moving, must sell. No rust 
or dents. Great gas 
mileage. 55,000 miles, 
$2500 or best. Musi see to 
appreciate. 

(312)526-2982 

85.3-67 

1984 FORD Escort, must 
sell, 4 speed, light gray, 
about 34,000 miles, 
AM/FM cassette, runs 
great. 

(312)356-8419 
after 6 p.m. 
osk for Rob 

B 5 3 69 

1975 CHEVROLET Impata, 
recent tune-up, complete 
rear brakes,' exhaust 
system, etc. Very good 
starter In all wealher, 
some rust. $450. 

(312)872-7390 

85-3-70 

198$ CADILLAC Coupe 
DeVllle, very good con- 
dition, under 45,000 miles. 
Full power. $7800 or best 
offer. 

(312)223-2431 
(312)689-1010 

85-3-74 

19S4 OLDS Flrenza, 4 door, 

Eower steering, power 
rakes, air conditioning, 
clean, reasonable 
mileage, $5195. 

(312)395-2409 

853-112 

1974 FORD LTD wagon, 
$200 or best offer or will 
sell for parts. 

(312)362-5426 

85-3-113 

1972 AMC Matador, V8. 4 

door, dependable, good 

battery, tires and exhaust. 

New water pump. $250. 

(312)623-4824 

evenings 

85-3-105 



1979 FORD Fiesta, runs 
good, $425 or best offer. 

(312)639-0403 

— 85-3-90 

1953 CHEVY pickup, $1200. 
1972 Mercury wagon, $200. 

(312)587-4658 

85-3-9 1— 

1970 HIGH performance 
Comoro, $2700 or best of- 
fer. 

(312)356-0336 

85-3-92— — 

1988 CHEVY Suburban 
Custom K-10 4x4, heavy 
duty front and back 
suspension, maintained 
well, many options ond 
new parts, $5400. 

(312)356-6633 

85-3-93 

19*4 FORD EXP, 5 speed, 
light gray , brand new llres 
and brakes. Excellent con- 
dition, $3800. 

(312)662-7707 

B5-3-97 — 

1975 OLDS Cutlass 4 door, 

Eower steering, power 
rakes, air conditioning, 
AM/FM stereo, very little 
rust, Interior In fair con- 
dition, runs terrific, $700. 
(312)566.0149' 
call anytime 

85-3.100 

1983 ALLIANCE, 2' door, 
sun-roof, 4 speed, recent 
tires, $2500. 

(312)623-8883 

85-3.101 

1910 OLDS Cutlass LS, ex- 
cellent condition, new 721" 
tires, complete new 
exhaust system, new 
brake*, must tee to op- 

fireclato. $2700 or best of- 
er. 

(312)540-0149 
lake Zurich 

85-3-102 

1910 PLYMOUTH Horizon, 
64,016 miles, rebuilt 
engine 1000 miles ago, 
AM/FM stereo, front 
wheel drive, hatchback, 
disc brakes, cruise control, 
sporty looking, excellent 
body and interior, $2500. 
(312)949-7246 
85-3-108 



•CROSSWORD PUZZLE * 



ACROSS 

1. Judge's bench 
5. Swindles (SI.) 
9. Depot (Abbr.) 

12. Smell 

13. Downfall 

14. Farceur 

15. Broad 

16. City dweller 
1B. Defrauds 

20. "— and 
bones" 

21. Secure 
23. Completed 
26. Protected 

30. Otherwise 

31. Wise old bird 

32. Number 

34. Mariner's 
direction 

35. Rates 

37. Catalogued 
39. Worries 
41. Tardy 



42. River duck 
44. Cuddle 
48. Pert 

51. Verbal 

52. Biblical well 

53. Arrow poison 

54. Hazard 

55. Joke 

5G. Forest creature 
57. Fling 



DOWN 



1, 
2 
3 
4, 
5 

6. 

7, 

8. 

9, 

10 

11 



Nods 

Mine entrance 

Knob 

Wrinkle 

Noble cause 

fighter 

Pronoun 

Penpolnts 

Serpent 

Fleeced 

Make lace 

Teen^— 



17. Baseball team 
19. Camera's eye 
22. Even 

24. Abstract 
being 

25. Properly 
transfer 

26. Remove 

27. Pitcher 

28. Evanescent 

29. Wine vessel 
33. Short letter 
36. Stride 

38. A vacation area 
40. Tasty 
43. Alley 

45. Threesome 

46. Damsel 

47. Wapitis 

48. Exhaust 

49. Irish crowning 
stone 

50. By maiden . 
name 




Thursday, January 1 5 , 1 987 



■ 






.-I-"- '■'■ 



■'JZJL. ;* 




85 DOMESTIC AUTOS 
FOR SALE 



CADILLACS, Mercedes, 
Porsche, etc. direct from 
government. Seized in 
drug raids. Available your 
orea. Save $thousands$ 
(216)453-3000 
ext. A2053 

83-3-2 

1977 BUtCK LaSabre, 
stereo, air, trailer 
package, excellent con- 
dition$1365. 

(312)244-0087 

85-3-BO 

1982 OUICK Riviera, mint 
condition, garage kept, 
never driven in snow, VB, 
automatic overdrive, front 
wheel drive, new tires, 
new brakes, new shocks, 
new battery, low miles, 
loaded. Vinyl top, wire 
wheels, must see, asking 
$8300. 

(312)526-2343 

• 85-3-78 

FINE '69. 1969 Z28 muscle 
car or show car, orange 
with stripes, garage kept, 
never driven. 402 big 
block, never started, (2) 
transmissions. 4 speed 
Muncle and 400 turbo 
automatic, many extra 
parts, $5000 firm. Must sell 
soon. 

(312)546-6198 
ask for Rob 

85-3-79 

1915 PLYMOUTH Turlsmo, 
5 speed, 2.2L, AM/FM 
radio, air, sunroof, 
burgandy interior, gold 
trim, 13,400 miles, wife's 
car. Will sett for balance 
owed on cor. 

(312)546-6341 
8 5 3 21 
1979 BUICK Eloctra Coupe, 
executive driven, well 
mainlained. $2200 or best 
offer. 

(312)362-9273 

85-3-42 

1H7 MUSTANG and parts. 
Disc brake set up, 4 
speeds, 8 Inch post, new 
loal springs, freshly 
rebuilt, race ready. 351 C, 
4 V heads and more. 
(312)746-5202 
after 4p;m. 

85-4-37 

1976 BUICK, 4 door sedan 

LeSabro, V6. Loaded. $495. 

(312)234-2651 

after 4 p.m. 

85-3-39- 

1978 PLYMOUTH Votore, 6 
cylinder, automatic, air. 
$650. 

(312)336-5831 

B5-3-40 

SMART CAR Buyers shop 
Lakeland Classified first. 
Turn your car Into cosh the 
quick and easy way. 



1984 RENAULT Alliance 
DL; FWD, 20,000 actual 
miles. New tires, air, 
automatic transmission, 
power steering/brakes, 
AM/FM stereo, no rust, 
mint condition. $4200. 

(312)587-3297 

85-3-20 

1986 MUSTANG LX, GT 
package, power steering 
and brakes, cruise, 3 door 
hatchback. 

(312)367-0814 
85-3-26 

1985 CHRYSLER LoBoron, 
loaded, power sun roof, 
under 25,000 miles, must 
sacroifice, $9500. 

(312)249-1914 

n c j .97 

1985 CHEVROLET Caprice 
Classic, 4 door, fully 
loaded, maroon, $1500 and 
take over payments, 

(312)546-5793 

85-3-28 

1973 MERCURY. $150 or 
best offer. Runs good. 

(312)746-1928 

after 4 p.m. 

85-3-29— 

1978 FORD Mustang. Hat- 
chback. 2 door Sound 
vehicle, $1000. 

(312)623-8468 
8a.m. to 10p.m. 

85-3 -30 

1977 CHEVROLET Nova 6 
cylinder, 3 speed, $400 or 
best offer. 

(312)356-3406 

85-3-31 

1912 TRANS Am, loaded, 
all power, T-tops. Must 
sell. $6500 will negotiate. 

(312)689-2474 
5 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

_ 85-3-35 

1977 OLDSMOBILE, 
custom cruiser wagon, 9 
passenger, well main- 
tained. $1750 or bast offer. 

(312)362-9273 

85-3-41 

BUYERS AND sellers come 
together every week in 
Lakeland Classified. 
1980 PLYMOUTH Horizon. 
64.016 miles, rebuilt 
engine 1000 milos ago, 
AM/FM stereo, front 
wheel drive, hatchback, 
discbrakos, cruise control, 
sporty looking, excollent 
body and inferior. $2500. 

(312)949-7246 
85-3-108 

1972 AMC Matador, VB, 4 

door, dependable, good 

battery, tires and exhaust. 

New water pump. $250. 

(312)623-4824 

evenings 

85-3-105 



^THIS WEEK'S- 



i^ll§il 






iBY SALOME I 



Weekly Tip: Changes can be what you make them, 
Aries (Mar. 21-Apr 19) Good news continues to come 
through from business associations. Expect an expansion 
of your current situation. Take time to relax. 

Tannu (Apr. 20-May 20) All work and no play can throw 
the Bull for a loop. Take time out to enjoy some special 
entertainment with loved ones. Youll feel fresher. 

Geulmi (May 21-June 20| It may be time for you to start 
projecting a new image. A new hairdo — a new wardrobe 
— perhaps even a career change. A friend has good advice. 

Cuter (June 21-Jul 20) Personal problems on the job i com- 
plicate matters. Ask for a private meeting to thrash out 
issues that cause fkreups belore they get too hot to handle. 

Leo (Jul 21-Aug. 22) Numbers play a big role on the job. 
Figures don't lie. Act on what you learn as soon as you 
get all the needed facta. Fair, but firm produces results. 

Virgo (Aug. 23.-Sept 22) Some stormy emotional weather 
needs to be endured Defcre things calm down and your pros- 
pecta become sunnier. Friends rally to offer loving support. 

Lib™ (Sept. 23-Oct 22) As you move into a new business 
area, your social circle widens to include new friends, uia 
friends may feel left out Reassure them. 

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) A relative or dose _friend may 
resent your we^meaning but misunderstood effort to matse 
him reconsider a decision. Off er facta to back your position. 

Satflttarlu (Nov. 22-Dec 21) A fraidsmp could be chang- 
in^tosanethingyou don't like. Don't be afraid tomake 
your own needs known if a friend tries to be too intrusive. 

Capricorn (Dec 22-Jan. 19) Family ^ mbCT l are , h ^ 
ened by the time you share with them. Discuss travel plans 
with them and ask for suggestions. 

Aqurioi (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) There are too many B^jcea 
around you. Be careful about making verbal commitments. 
Put things in writing to avoid niisunderstandinga. 

Place* (Feb, 19-Mar. 20) TreeJingwater In f&$°Z*8^ 
may be safer - but it doesn't get ypu <*nywJ^S"f 
aspect? favor moving in for a doser look at an opportunity. 
© 1987, McNaugnt Synd. .. ,. 



DOMESTIC AUTOS 
FOR 

1980 CHEVETTE, 4 speed, 
low mileage, ariglnol 
owner, $2500. 

(312)367-1428 
after 6 p.m. 

85.3-75 

1978 PONTIAC Grond 
LeMans, loaded, $2500 or 
best oiler. 

(312)356-9149 

_ — -85-3-84 

1980 GRAND Prix, V6, 
62,000 miles, power 
steering, power brakes, 
air conditioning, dark 
green with tan intorior, 1 
owner, very clean, firm at 
$2500. 

(312)356-7353 
,85:3-85 



1911 

XLT, 

$5500. 



FORD Bronco 4x4 
new' 302 engine, 

(312)634-3059 
-B5-3-88 



1979 FORD Fiesta, runs 
good, $425 or best oiler. 
(312)639-0403 

B5-3-90 

1933 CHEVY pickup, $1200. 

1972 Mercury wagon, $200. 

(312)587-4658 

853-91 

1970 HIGH performance 
Comoro, $2700 or best of- 
fer. 

(312)3560336 

85-3-92 

1984 CHEVY Suburban 
Custom K-10 4x4, heavy 
duty front and back 
suspension, maintained 
well, many options and 
new parts, $5400. 

(312)356-6633 

85-3-93 

1914 FORD EXP. 5 speed, 
light gray, brand new tiros 
and brakes. Excellent con- 
dition, $3800. 

(312)662-7707 
B 5 3 97 

1973 OLDS Cutlass 4 door, 

Eower steering, power 
rakes, air conditioning, 
AM/FM stereo, very little 
rust, interior in fair con- 
dition, runs terrific, $700, 
(312)5660149 
coll anytime 

85-3-100 

1913 ALLIANCE, 2 door, 
sun-roof, 4 speed, recent 
tires, $2500. 

(312)623-8883 

85-3-101 

1910 OLDS Cutloss LS, ex- 
cellent condition, new 721 
tires, complete new 
exhaust system, new 
brakes, must seo to op- 

firociote. $2700 or best of- 
or. 

(312)5400149 
Lake Zurich 

85-3-102 

1984 COUGAR LS, VB, low 
miles, loaded wilh lactory 
options, transferable 
warranty. $8900 or best of- 
fer. 

(312)362-B473 

85-3-65 

1980 PLYMOUTH Horizon. 
Moving, must sell. No rust 
or danls. Groat gas 
mileago. 55,000 miles, 
$2500 or best. Must seo to 
appreciate. 

(312)526-2982 

85-3-67 

1984 FORD Escort, must 
sell, 4 speed, light gray, 
about 34,000 miles, 
AM/FM cassette, runs 
groat. 

(312)356-8419 
alter 6 p.m. 
ask (or Rob 

85-3-69 

1973 CHEVROLET Impala, 
recent tune-up, complete 
rear brakes, oxhaust 
system, etc. Very good 
starter in all weather, 
some rust. $450. 

(312)872-7390 

85-3-70 

1983 CADILLAC Coupe 
DeVille, very good con- 
dition, under 45,000 miles. 
Full power. $7800 or best 
offer. 

(312)223-2431 
(312)689-1010 

85-3-74 

HOUSE HUNTING? Find 
just the home you're 
looking for In Lakeland 
Newspapers' Classified. 
(312)223-8161 



85 DOMESTIC AUTOS 

FOR SALE, 
I 

1983 PLYMOUTH Turismo, 
5 speed, 2.21, AM/FM 
radio, air, sunroof, 
burgandy Interior, gold 
trim, 13,400 miles, wife's 
car. Will sell lor balonce 
owed on car. 

(312)546-6341 

_ 85-3-21 

1979 BUICK Electro Coupe, 
executive drlvon, well 
maintained. $2200 or best 
offer, 

(312)362-9273 

— , 85-3-42: 

1974 FORD LTD wagon, 
$200 or best offer or will 
sell for parts. 

(312)362-5426 

85-3-113 

1978 PLYMOUTH Volare, 6 
cylinder, automatic, air. 
$650. 

(312)336-5831 

85-3-40 



as DOMESTIC AUTOS i* 5 DOMESTIC AUTOS 



1x2 



Sounds like 
multiplication? guess 
again. It's newspaper 
talk for a one column 
by 2-inch ad. To small 
to be effective? 
You;re reading this 
one! 



FOR SALE 



CADILLACS, Mercedes, 
Porsche, etc. direct from 
government. Seized in 
drug raids. Available your 
area. Save {thousands? 
(216)453-3000 
ext. A2053 

83-3-2 — 

1977 BUICK LaSabre, 
stereo, air, trailer 
package, excellent con- 
dition $1365. 

(312)244-0087 

85-3-80 ' 

1984 OLDS Firenzo, 4 door, 

Cower steering, power 
rakes, air conditioning, 
cleon, reasonable 
mileage, $5195. 

(312)395-2409 

85-3-112 

MARKETPLACE for smart 
shoppers, that's Lakeland 
Classified. 

(312)223-8161 



FOR SALE 



■ 



87 



1982 BUICK Riviera; mint 
condition, garage kept, 
never driven in snow, V8, 
automatic overdrive, front 
wheel drive, new tires, 
new brakes, now shocks, 
new battery, low miles, 
loaded. Vinyl top, wire 
wheels, must see, asking 
$8300. 

(312)526-2343 

85-3-78 

FINE '69. 1969 Z28 muscle 
car or show car, orange 
with stripes, garage kept, 
never driven. 402 big 
block, never started, (21 
transmissions. 4 speed 
Muncie and 400 turbo 
automatic, many extra 
parts, $5000 firm. Must sell 
soon. 

(312)546-6198 
ask for Rob 

85-3-79 



SNOWMOBILES 



1980 SKI-DOO snow- 
mobile and trailer, $1200 
for both. 

(312)244-8793 

87-3-83 

ARCTIC KITTY Cat 
snowmobile, good con- 
dition, $495. A sleigh to 
pull behind a snowmobile, 
$50. 

(312)356-2248 

87-3-94 

1979 SKI-DOO snow- 
mobile. Like new, low 
mileage, electric and 
manual starter with hand 
warmers. Snowbird 2 place 
trailer with spare. $1500 or 
best offer. 

(312)651-4621 
after 4 p.m. 

87-3-103 

FIND A JOB, or fill a job-. 

with Lakeland Classified. 



»■.:::«!'.»! 



»»s!S!5£! 



::•-«? 



«n* 



asK»»» 



•::«?.:"■ 






Meet your match...a 
guide for singles, 
widows and widowers. 
Published every 
Thursday, here's a way 
to meet others with . 
similar interests. Make 
a friend or perhaps 
even meet your 
llfemate! 




"heSS °* WH be r ' 9h ' '° r^fec. The 





« s,ed » a s e ? a '?L sen* W °" e pfS p.O. 
months- — ■—■. 




'eMo+tall 



Only In 
Lakeland 
Classified 



COUPON- 



Name. 



I 

I 

I Address. 

I 

I Town 

I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



.State. 



.Zip- 



Phone 



Amount 

.Enclosed $ 

(Incl. $2.00 for box no.) 



Mall to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

If you need Information or help 
in wording your ad, call Sylvia at (312) 223-8161 



Thursday, January 15, 1987 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 A 








land Newspapers 

r 



To Place Your 
Ad Hare Call 





rs 



Business & Services 




■ : 




■■ ■-', 



A-1 TOWING 

8 S, ROUTE 12 
Fox Lake, Illinois. 



*24 Hour Towing 
* Jump Starting 
* Flatbed Service 
Auto Repair - 

(312) 587-7525 



NEW CHEV P.U. 
FENDERS 73-SO 



In Stock. 



ChevP.U. doors 73-80 $109.95 

Chev P.U, hoods 73-80 $134,95 

Chov P.U. front bumpors $89.00 

Ford P.U. fenders 73-79 $46.95 

Dodge P.U. fenders 71 -BO SI 05.95 



Of ha new body parts miltbk for cm and trucks. 

ROY ALE TRUCK & AUTO SALVAGE 

(312)587-9522 



ROCKENBACH 



CHEVROLET 



Complete Service 

Parts & Body Shop 

Departments 

21 E. Belvidere(Rf. 120) 

(312)223-8651 



DottHowe 

HAIRCUTTING SALON 

We Are Offering: 

Men's Hair Cutting and Styling. Men'* 
Hair Replacement, latest Techniques 
and Hair Coloring and Texurlxlng, 
Manicures & Sculptured Nolls, Hair 
Waxing Removal, Facials, Make-Up and 
Application and Consultation. 

Phono (312) 356-8394 

Man, 10 o.m.-7 p.m.: Tuvs. 9 a m .-5 p.m. 
Wed.-Fri . 9 o.m.-7 p.m.: Sat. 8 a.m. -3 p.m. 

1 10 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa 




An Invitation From 

CALVARY 

ProMbytorlan 

CHURCH 



Rev. Lisle Kauffman, Pastor 
COME WORSHIP WITH US 



Sundoy Worship 
Sunday School 



9:30 fill 1:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 



510 CEDAR LAKE ROUND LAKE 
: (312) 5464444 



NORTHLAKES 

Foot And Ankle Clinic 

37 N. Whitney 
Grayslake, IL 

For The Treatment Of Foot 

And Ankle Disorders 
.For Appointment Call: 

(312) 223-1020 



Fun Entertainment For 
Any Event 




unnt 

The Bira 



Doing the 

"Bird (Chicken) 

Donee" 

For More Information 



(312) 740-0667 




WE MLS0 WE HEW BOOKS 

(312) 526-2968 



"SILK-fl-HAT 



"Silk flowers 
arrangement 
occasions! ! 



s" and 3nt* 

$ for_oM ^J- 



Mom's check with us for 
those cherished 

"SHOWER GIFTS!" 

Hazel Doyle Grayslake 

(312)223-3166 




Great 
Financing On 

1987 

CHRYSLER ft PLYMOUTH MODELS 

5.5 % Financing Chrysler 5th Am. Damn 
5.5% On U baron (LIS, 1 Dodge Lancers 

KiciStlictbiliStfick 

8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 
(312)356.2530 

130 Cedar Ave., Lako Villa, IL 



VOLVO 
SPECIALIST 

"All kind of repairsot competitive prices.' 
"Mechanical and body work." 
"Used Volvo parts available." 

CH. IMPORTS, Inc. 

127 S. Route 12 
Fox Lake, IL 

(312) 587-1055 



SH0J1S BOILDIIfi IAD 101990116 COMMIT 

We specialize in roofing, 

room additions, cement 

work, insurance losses and 

old buildings. 

WORK YOU CAN TRUST 

(312)3364307 



1604 Grand Ave 
Waukegan, IL 








OFFICE FURNITURE 
& SUPPLIES 

"Everything for your office" 

Wood & Steel OK.ce Desks & Chain. Olfice Equipment 

& Supplies. InsoUted Tiles & Sales, Typewriters- 

Calculators, Printing & Computer Supplies. Artist's 

Soppltts-Filifif Cabinets 

Daily 9-5:30"Saturday 9-3 . 

Fox Lake Office Supply 

7N.Nipptf.lnkB). . 
Fo< U*«, IL 

.(312) 387-8277 




10% Disc, to Senior Citizens 

AO the Time-Eidodei 2-6 P.M. Specials 



(-' 




Restaurant 



1145 Main StrMl 

(Routei 173 £83) 

Antirxh. Illinois 60002 

Family Dining 
Breakfast Lunch & Oinn 




Senior Citizen Specials: 

*"» ». 

Monday through Friday ^ r^/N/Y — 



From 2 p.m. lo 6 p.m. 



Boby Beef liver > *A n. 

Pork Tenderloin** ~ 

Fried Chicken [^ rj 
Meot lool *4^ 

Fried Perch 
' Roosl Turkey 
Fried Horn 
Sandwich Deluxe 

(312)395-7212 






YOUNG'S 
WOOD REFINISHING 



Interior woodwork and furniture. 
Fireplaces-Stairs-Pianos-Doors 

Free Estimates (815) 678-4170 

Ask For Bruce 

Call AH«r 6 p.m. 
And Waokendt. 



5704 South St. 
Richmond. Illinois 



Carl Waerner 

HEATING & COOLING 

LENNOX 

Air Conditioning * Healing 
Since 1931 

(815)459-2300 

Wauconda's Certified Rt 'JJ 6 

LENNOX Dealer Bu £ n - S 

Financing Available Bridge 



Lorraine's Professional 
NailSahn 

Have Your Nolls Done By a 

Professional For That Special 

Event Or For That 

Special Person YOU I 

SCULPTURED NAILS $20 

FILL INS $10 

MANICURES $5 

(312)356-2704 

RCSNO-PLOWING 

'Commercial 'Residential 

*Snow Plowing 
*Snow Removal 

*24 Hour Service 

* FREE ESTIMATES 
(312)497-4676 




LIKE CNITY UEA 1KIT1M1L CEITOl 

mm »« 

JMUmSPECIML 

We tell & recommend ' flip 

The Paul Mitchotl Products 

Monday - Friday Only 

CaO(MS)MJ."CrjrS" •»& 

19S25 W.WoJrinoton^GnjyilaV.. 1 , IMAM 



(Adieuni le *• CcJWg* ot let* Count?) 



ULtMlM 




mr.stcam 



Bonded 
Insured 



L<- / 



North West Janitorial 

& 
Carpet Cleaning Service 

Residential * Commercial • Industrial 
BERNARD SESKO (312)233-8533 




1 



Vaup. iolod. Okm* a 
Potato Coll** 1 0»n*.'t 




OFFERING C0MPIETI ROOFING SERICES 

♦Hejidfnliol •((•■Rooting 

•Commercial ■Repair* 

•Indultfiol - 'Mew Construction 



FULLY INSURED • TERMS AVAILABLE 
CALL TODAY FOR FREE CONSULTATION 
(3121526-6402- 



If any man speak, let him speak as 
the oracles of God; 

COME 110 HEIR PURE BIBLE TEICIII6: 

Church oS CHRIST 

1 109 Hainsville Road 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

(312)546-8111 



Sunday Bible Study: 
Sunday Worship: 



9:30 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
and 6:00 p.m. 
Wednesday Blblo Study: 7:00 p.m. 




Route 1 2 Towing & Service , T0W|M mmi , J0|| C|| HQ|om 

fL" akomnl "™™ »»■« -SIOWfLOWIK 



(312)587-0788 




BUYING 

Aluminum-Cans 

*COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 

*STARTERS 
♦ALTERNATORS 

JUNK CAR 
REMOVAL 

A-1 Used Auto Parts 



LAKES SELF STORAGE 

SPACE AVAILABLE 

Call now to reserve your storage space 
Ryder Truck rental also available 

514 Rollins Road 
Fox Lake, Illinois. 

(at Rollins Rd. & Jefferson, across from Ingelside Train Station) 

(312)587-0131 



SAME DAY SERVICE AT 



Lakes Auto Radiator 



#&* 



AUTO AIR CONDITIONING 

Free Towing Service (15 Mites) 

(Engine Steam Cleaning) 

* ''Repairing 'Rocoring 'Flushing 

•Heater S Radiator Exchange -Go* Tank* Ropairod 'Reverie Hushing 'Water Punps 

5 Year And 1 Year Warranties On. Radiators 

Over 25 Years Experience - Senior Ciizens Discount 

(312)587-7799 

5W Rollins Rd., Ingleside (Across From Ingleside Train StoiJon) 




VISA 



x^nI 






(312)587-7525 



Cargo Vans 

Conversion vans 

12Ft.--22Ft.Vans 

Lift Gates Available 



&» SW 9rW<*%, &7w °)ie</</<n$ fffffl w gW 

'Announcements 
•Wedding Invitations 
•Wedding Accessories 
•Specialty Napkins 
•Stationery 'Etc. 

Ask About Publishing Your Engagement Photo £% 
Come In And Sec Our Lovely Selections 

Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 

30 South Whitney Street Groylloka, Illinois 




22A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January i 5, 1 987 



r :. 



4«MiMMHMmaMp^MWai|«iNIWMriP* 



^*"^ 




mmm 



Lakeland Newspapers 

Your 



ToPlac 




lil^emii 

Newspapers 

7b Area Business & Services (312) 223-8181 




F./LMI 




WWHmWI*i» ii 'H HHH i t l n" it i" i» 



When wn the hnt 
ttnM you hod a ? 

doRdovt J«ndae f 
soda or thaho? 




Let Baskbi-Robbins refresh your memory 



BASKKMIOBBINS 

ICE ennui STOW 



Hound LoUe Comment (3 12) 223-0678 




"REMODELIHG" 

*Carpentry 
*.Roof ing 

*lnterior and Exterior 
Painting and Decorating 

Call "BATARI" 

For FREE Estimates 
(815)675-2437 



s g lesgssm §s$ei 

Round Lake 

RESERVATIONS 
(312)546-3900 



WEDDINGS 
REUNIONS 
CHRfSTAAAS 
PARTIES 



** 




a 




MOBILE DISC JOCKEY ENTERTAINMENT 




Madeline Korman 
For More Information 
(312) 623-8439 



GRADUATIONS 

SOCK HOPS 

FUNDRAISERS 



CERTIFIED AUTO REPAIRS 
FOREIGN CAR SPECIALISTS 



MUFFLERS 
INSTALLED 

Most US. Automobiles 



$29 



76 



wmcoupoN 



A-Tire County Service 

•Tunw-vps * Mufflwi • Cari»trr»for* • Towing 
e Ignition • Overhauls • •rattM • Allgnniafiti 



{312)546-7491 , 

Day Phone ■■■_ 
363 N. Cedar Lake Rd. Towing Klght Phone 
Bound Lake (312) 546-2289 





7T5Y 




SOUNZ SYSTEMS 

T R A V E L | N G UGHTSHOW 



music 



occasions 



o 

michael 
(312) 244-1570 



FOR TOUR ROUDW PARTIES IRSIST OR THE 
BEST EHTERTiiniEflT 



Prof « ilonol Window Tin ling Auto , Home 
Mobile Service Office & R.V. 

cNoilUUhn <WuiJow W«jSi 
Winter Savings Of 15-20% OFF 

BOB TELLEFSEN (312) 587-0079 



AuthorfiMl Dttllff Appllctlof 
En*rgy Control Products 



3NI 



I 



FLOOD VICTIMS 

WE GOT HIT ONCE! 

Let's Not Get Caught 
Agaln,_ Flood Insurance 
Now Available To You. 

FREE PRICE QUOTES 

Call Nowl 

Dan Korvas Agency 

(312) 647-0587 



^Insulation 

'Storm Windows 
'Porches • Decks 
'Aluminum And 
Vinyl Siding - 
'Additions 



Lake & 
McHenry 
County 




All Work 
Guaranteed 

(815)728-1239 



"Roofing 
All Types 
'Flat Roofs 
Torch Down 
'Rubber 
'Shingle Roofs 




Round Lake Beach 
(312)740-0022 

Antioch . 
(312) 395-6996 



European TanSpa 

Some Promise The Moon- 
We Deliver The Sun 

Package Rates As Low As 

*4 



per session 



L 



Exclusive Face Tanners In All Sunheds 



CHAIN O'LAKES TRUCKING 
& EXCAVATING 

Snow Plowing & Snow Removal 

Rosldontlal & Commercial 
24-Hour Sorvleo — Fully InMUrod 




(312) 587-5151 

(312) 546-8676 i) ^^ 




NORM'S HOME 
MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It All. 
•Remodeling 

Kitchens, Bathtooms & Rec Rooms 

•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(All Types) 
•Siding And Roofing 

•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work Very Well Done 

FREE ESTIMATES, CALL 
(414) 537-2439 




CC 



ORPHANS OF THE STORM 

Adopt A Pet - Save A Life" 
Always 250 Dogs, 50 Cats 

Pure and mixed for approved homes. At nominal fees. 

Visit 1-5 (7 days) 
2200 Riverwoods Road West Of Deerfield 




JS1B ■ ■■ ■■' 

Residential & 

Commercial 

Large Or Small Jobs 

Call For FREE Estimate 

(312) 356-5072 



Professional Shirt Laundry 
Drapes - Leathers - Pillows 




Same Day Service 
In By 12, Out By 5 

NO EXTRA CHARGE 

Mon,<Fri. 7 a,.m. To 7 p.m. 
Sat. 7 a.m. To 6 p.m. 



Samlonc 



2219 «nd Street, North Chicago, Illinois (312) 689-1003 



THE EXTRA 



ANTIOCH'S SELF SERVICE & STORAGE PLACE 
Corner of Anita & Depot St. 

u-ij»CK-nr 

RjTTTTTrr^ f |>in j>! * Ui ^ T ' 1:/lTc1: * 

SECURITY FENCED & LIGHTED 

RESERVE SPACE NOW! 
For More Information 





FOr ^Tk^ 

Your ^IFr^ 
Celebrations?* y 7 s3 
In This 
New Year 



When You Need A 
Nurse... 

An Alph Nurse is Professional and 

Caring With Skills and Ability To 

Meet Your Needs 

Aepka CtoKaK Regcaty, 

Sewing Hsn&m 9Ku«u 

(312)392-2909 




.JU GOSPEL RANCH 

^V "A Full Gospel Church 

6:00 p.m. Teaching For The New Testament Church 

Thursday 7 p.m. ^'^""^ . r ."^Z' Jo-Come Grow With «*' 
Pastor Frank Lobaza Invites You To Come <*r 

I PRAYER FOR HE ^'"« EVERY SUNDAY SERVICE 

T hursday, January 1 5, 1 987 



O Send someone a 
i balloon bouquet 



Send a Teddy Bear 
too 

Hire R Clown, Super 
Chicken, The Great 
Ape for your party. 



P.S. Vfe carry Russ 

Bertie stuffed animals, 

featuring Snuggles 

(312)680-3224 

BALLOONS 
& CLOWNS 



We ship balloon} anywiief e (n the U„S. 
viia, (HosteiCoxd and American lipieu oaepted 



«**£& 



J & M Transmissions, Inc. 

'Shifting Gears Toward The Future" 

FREE Estimates 




Specializing in All types of Transmission service and repair. 
100% warranteed Including: 
•FRONT WHEEL DRIVE 'HEAVY DUTY TRUCK 

•MOTOI iHOMES 'HIGH PERFORMANCE 

J & M Transmissions, Inc. 

4207 Wllmot Rd. ( Sunnyside, IL 
(815) 385-9133 . (815) 385-9134 



V— i 



tot <&cu* WeMinp, ®he #««% @ t 

'Announcements 

•Wedding Invitations 

•Wedding Accessories 

•Specialty Napkins 

•Stationery 'Etc. . _~^ 

Ask About Publishing Your Engagement Photo $T? m . 
Come In Arid Sec Our Lovely Selections 

Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 




30 Soulh Whitney Street 



Groysloke, Illinois 



Lakeland Newspapers 23A 



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86 CAMARO 



10.000 miles, air condition- 
ing, power windows, power 
locks, power fialch. Eagle GT 
Tires, stereo/cassette, rear 
delogger, Chapman^Alarm, 
till, cruise, interval wipers. 



',7 



"\> 



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\ m 



'85 CAPRICE 
CLASSIC 4 DR. 

V-8, automatic, air condition* 
Ing; tint glass, stereo, 
custom interior, defroster, 
sunroof. 



'55=s«SSS!*3 



1985 L 



■J 4a.»-riy- a- .'■•vr;. j == _^.- . 



* 



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. ,-. 



'84 CAMARO \ 
Z-28 

Automatic, air conditioning, 
stereo/cassette, defroster , 
must see!! 



'83 

CAVALIER 

4 DR. 

40.000 miles, sharp, must 
see! 



/'":! JES» — 



449 






WfrVff./.-.^.^ r-.StJ~y±- 






^g?*j->;l 



100% DRIVETRAIN GUARANTEE 



'85 NISSAN SENTRA 



$ 4375 



'85 PONTIAC GRAND AM 

$ 8975 



'81 DATSUN KING CAB 

<(•.'.(■«< S '..-#ffl CJi«l1f SAVE' . «k _ A H 

$3495 



MOCO.fcioiT-i!";. rttrtiiw} M str« ;u!f*i 
wieno* 



'84 BUICK SKYHAWK 2 DR. 

*utoi-4i<. V* vr&wi irt t**J i'«c :?"«!« ^ _ ^r^r^r^ 



'84 FORD THUNDERBIRD 

*5D00nJ*i «u*0"i*l< fr« eon*!**"*; l-*tf<tti »"e 

irVf<i. jtf «. i«iy< ■it«*»3* ;vk 



'83 CAPRICE CLASSIC 4 DR. 

I t-'CcM.lr^i.".; i'i in! .i'[.Vf'i ilri* [inter ■: Sit fl * E 



'81 BUKH LeSABRE 

V6. lutomiiit. tit cofldiiKWirg. iirito/cassctte. 

'? j- dttroiier 



$ 4975 



'83 BUICK CENTURY 4 DR. 

*MX->5 K'.yj'-: ['.»f s'fr'.j pc««b-j>(i >' > ■-•■ tflti —*•■-■« 



'81 CAMARO 

V I Wjrjln, ML c^g ••** e i s . *.ffK^«»*l* ClxJ*.' 



$ 3995 



'85 ASTRO PASSENGER VAN 

)J 000 ml« ' WMdje ««-s} « c.i*«Jf fc'^W *,| tf ^ ■» -Hi 

|*-*«yxj.t©w; Wf«i |1(*M :m-.'" "«--,' l»*j »■ ■ /■ TfK 
|i^--rv.--^.f S»n ^ |, | ■■ g ^ 



'84 CELEBRITY 4 DR. 

V *|P0 •*•■>*. v f. juiDTjiic .i,» con-Mconinr) •*>>«% ^ r^ na 
lil r*ii uswlie toiwt rU't But. Wu-; cusiom Jiln f S 



'8D OLDS DELTA 88 4 DR. 

¥4 mmw. ee»r •<<&;*%. vmr kx,\v f**t* j»j*. A ^ ^^^ ^ ^ 
v co-an**'-; itp«, jrii Hits SnQ f R 



'85 BUICK SKYLARK 4 DR. 

3f,00OT»i(*.,r»*t' stee'in*", po*t' b'J'ts. J" ^_ ^ ^ 

£ondil«"iing tml UeifO ihi'p' 



'84 DODGE CHARGER 

JSCCOfJeS [OtfS'KW, K*t*t*»tH »!Cf/C!On A— — - 

■-.; I*, itvn sui*wi JC r* *f^ *^ p 

84 PONTlKC J-ZOOO 4 DR. 

$ 4975 



I ;)i:iiet. fcitsmHC *' c0'<3 1'0'-".^ V.:. I'M. Stt'tO 
Cirtlon Wtno; 



'84 OLDS CUTLASS LS 

d tl'\nttt< ij'omjt.f ,|.f (OnfiiKnini) pi>fi •#>•■% ^fc ^ ^ 
Slffimq po*t* t.'^'^V III) fltltel SlfrfO jllQlkl 



'84 HORIZON 

< CJtifKXf, tUlOnVB*. I><M, fJt!ff»t(f. MVE 



s 3975 



83 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 

I ll!(0 I J'! pOHtl 



$ 7975 



-T; 



^!SW 



ra» : 



" ■^r^*y»*y*»-f*^' 



'84 NISSAN SENTRA 



30.000 mit« 4 ty«->(Jf*. i jpftfj itfrM, rjflog 
g«.iiv*; rtf. 



$ 3975 



'83 PONTIAC 6000 4 DR. 

* J OT rw«, iLianjl«. *JC»r fmkw. »» ttHMwq. 
Mt, Mil. ml »r«(>. [MM*, tttw trtffic, »•«* 
ivik, Oi:r*\ it|rf\ { rvH 



$ 6475 



'85 TOYOTA 4x4 PICKUP 

?O.0OQ miltj titnroat ilifiing »mao* 



$ 9975 



'85 BEAUVILLE VAN 

VB IjlO^IK li' CBi0'!-".nif5 3o*ti 

jieteb Wftn txis q^j^e*. 



rMn ^ |i 

$ 12,93» 



'84 DATSUN 200 SX 



39,000 mittt. Juiomjtic. ju. power windows 
W. iKrtoui»1t(. junrool 



$ 6975 



'83 CAPRICE ESTATE WAGON] 

t Mtit^tr. iiOOO «»I«S ¥ I *,lamnc *• tOTM** A _'_ ,^ « -f 

n] trt Ml -c.p.-'vjj.i po.f locn wlin-fjc* STAOE 






^Tv^r^l 






i 



^CKE^B4C^ 






r^~ ^! 



Thr-M Rood* Or Wuh 
ailHifW i Tir-r aa 



by Th€f Lakt> 
AYSLAKE 
(2258651 



GHEVROtiET 



SINCE1926. 






24A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday, January i 5, 1987 



■ 
















■ 



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, 



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mt iiiii.w'wiiI